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Forum topic by Stanley Coker posted 972 days ago 2066 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Stanley Coker

207 posts in 1798 days


972 days ago

I have seen some projects that has what looks like turquoise inlayed into the wood. Is this a mixture that can be poured into the crevice or cracks in the wood? If so, does ayone know where I can find this?

Thanks

Stanley Coker

-- Stanley, North Georgia


10 replies so far

View Mickey Cassiba's profile

Mickey Cassiba

312 posts in 1633 days


#1 posted 972 days ago

When turning a piece of crotch wood, I often encounter cracks and voids. I use ‘chalk’ turquoise(my wife gets it from one of her bead suppliers) mixed with two part epoxy. The faux turquoise is easily crushed and tool friendly. Real turquoise dust is available as well, but it’s a little pricey. Google ‘crushed turquoise’. I did and got a lot of hits.

-- One of these hammers oughta fix that...

View wingate_52's profile

wingate_52

219 posts in 1172 days


#2 posted 972 days ago

Google ” Inlace”.

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15665 posts in 2820 days


#3 posted 972 days ago

There are many materials you can use in this way. Here is an informative link:

http://www.woodturningvideosplus.com/inlay-materials.html

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Kent Shepherd's profile

Kent Shepherd

2697 posts in 1888 days


#4 posted 971 days ago

I buy crushed turquois from these guys. http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/store/Decorative_Materials___Inlay_Materials?Args=

I use both epoxy and CA glue depending on how fine the stone is, and how big the crack you are filling is.
CA glue works well with finely crushed stone in a small void. I prefer epoxy and coarse stone on larger voids.

-- She thought I hung the moon--now she just thinks I did it wrong

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1242 days


#5 posted 971 days ago

Good thread. I never thought about using crushed anything for inlays. I love it when you guys force the wheels to turn ! ;=)

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View ocwoodworker's profile

ocwoodworker

203 posts in 1606 days


#6 posted 971 days ago

I’m with David. What a concept! Is this possible for just plain ol’ banding in a piece of furniture?

-- I'd like to believe Murphy's Law haunts my woodshop, because if it's Karma it would mean I had something to do with it. - K.R.

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1242 days


#7 posted 971 days ago

Good idea, Kevin.

I’m thinking of this as something besides mother of pearl, abalone and shell for guitar neck inlays (and other). Hmmm…

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

5414 posts in 2031 days


#8 posted 971 days ago

I’m a cheap old bastard. Raw stone is fairly inexpensive. I crush it with a homemade mortar and pistil.
Other materials to consider are brass filings from a key making machine. I get mine at ACE. A lot of dentists still use Mercury and silver fillings. I’ve bought dozens of their little capsules for cheap. One capsule will make a 2” initial 1/8X1/8.
Crushed iron pyrite, sprinkled sparingly with a salt shaker on to the first or second wet coat of an oil based finish will give you a rich look. I also sprinkle a little in with turquoise inlay. Nice!

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View wingate_52's profile

wingate_52

219 posts in 1172 days


#9 posted 971 days ago

I use silver dentists amalgam. I tape the capsule to the blade of a jigsaw and give it a shake, spoon it into an epoxy coated recess. Smooth down with a dental smoothing tool? Similar to a small spoon and scrape smooth when dry.

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15665 posts in 2820 days


#10 posted 971 days ago

David: To answer your question about furniture, I used Inlace to hide the glue joints on this cherry desk.

Click for details

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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