LumberJocks

Grinder (dry) recommendations?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Elizabeth posted 11-28-2011 07:45 PM 1145 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Elizabeth's profile

Elizabeth

814 posts in 2604 days


11-28-2011 07:45 PM

I’ve got a corner of my shop that doesn’t have a tool in it, and there have been a few instances over the last few months when I wished I had a grinding wheel, so I think there’s a purchase in my future. But I have no idea what I need.

Background: I had a Grizzly wet grinder but sold it and am planning on getting a Tormek T-7 before the end of the year. I will probably not be doing a LOT of dry grinding, maybe occasional reshaping of new turning tools once I learn how to do that, but mostly just getting rid of sharp edges on occasional metal pieces. For example, several of my drill bits have developed burrs on the chuck end and the hand file is not really sorting them out.

Does anyone have recommendations on what size of wheel I should get? Maybe a model that has one grinding wheel and one buffing wheel? Is anything at Harbor Freight worth the money in this category, or should I skip that and go to something from a big-box store or even Woodcraft/Rockler? I’d probably prefer one with an attached lamp as there’s no additional light fittings in that corner of the shop; though I suppose I could haul over my floor-standing halogen when needed.

Thanks all.


12 replies so far

View Don W's profile

Don W

17958 posts in 2028 days


#1 posted 11-28-2011 08:49 PM

I would recommend a slow speed grinder for sharpening. Get an get a aluminum oxide wheel with a friable bond. I like an 8” because it has less of a hollow for a hollow grind.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View Elizabeth's profile

Elizabeth

814 posts in 2604 days


#2 posted 11-28-2011 08:52 PM

Don, I’ll have slow speed covered with the Tormek.

View Don W's profile

Don W

17958 posts in 2028 days


#3 posted 11-28-2011 08:57 PM

They have dual speed grinders as well.

I have the ryobi 8” from Home depot. It was like$70. The first one burnt out in less than a year. Second one has been fine. I wouldn’t recommend this one.

I guess I’m a little unclear what your going to do with it, although a good grinder always has a use. I’d think the tormek would take care of most of your needs.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View Elizabeth's profile

Elizabeth

814 posts in 2604 days


#4 posted 11-28-2011 09:02 PM

I might be unclear as well, I guess! I may be succumbing to just wanting a tool that I don’t have. But I’m thinking for occasional de-burring of metal pieces, possible sharpening of rods into points and aggressive re-shaping of turning tools prior to wet grinding them.

Might not be necessary, but it’s an idea I’ve been toying with for a while, particularly a buffer/grinder combination.

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16241 posts in 3679 days


#5 posted 11-28-2011 09:12 PM

You can probably get by with less, but I have a” Delta 8 variable speed. It comes with a white wheel and a buffing wheel, and of course youi can purchase any other types of wheels you want. I use it with a Wolverine jig for sharpening my turning tools.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View crank49's profile

crank49

3980 posts in 2431 days


#6 posted 11-28-2011 09:17 PM

I have had six of the 6” generic type grinders which were used as buffing, polishing machines in my jewelry manufacturing business. I have had a coupe of 8” machines, one generic and a Ryobi. The Ryobi is the least powerful of all of the machines I have owned; but the best finished and smoothest running. May be smooth because it’s so underpowered, I’m not sure. The generics, like the ones sold at Harbor Freight generally work well for a year or two. If you expect the quality, fit and finish of the Tormek in a regular grinder you better look to a good brand name like Baldor.

This type machine will cost around $350.
But it’s precision machined, balanced, top quality throughout.
It will be the Powermatic class machine of grinders.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

View Elizabeth's profile

Elizabeth

814 posts in 2604 days


#7 posted 11-28-2011 09:28 PM

Thanks Crank. I don’t expect Tormek quality in something one or two hundred dollars in price, but I would like it to last for more than a couple of years under light use. So sounds like HF is out, which I kind of expected. The Delta that Charlie has looks interesting and Rockler says an updated model is due out next January, so I might hold on for a few months and see what it’s like. But I welcome more suggestions in the meantime!

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13003 posts in 2154 days


#8 posted 11-28-2011 10:06 PM

You can always buy a wheel and arbor; find a motor and build your own. I’ve got a 1hp Delta motor scavenged from an old saw, about $30 worth of pillowblocks/axle/step pulleys, and about a $30 stone. If you’re game for the challenge, $100 could probably build you a really nice setup. I’ve got the Tormek but if I had it to do over again, I’d get the wolverine jig instead of the tormek jigs. I like it much better for lathe tools. If you’re getting a Tormek, it’ll replace anything you buy now. I’d either build something cool or wait. Good luck!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Don W's profile

Don W

17958 posts in 2028 days


#9 posted 11-28-2011 10:38 PM

If you have a tormek and a decent disk or belt sander, I’m not sure you couldn’t do everything you need. I’d still pick one up if you stumble on a good used one for a good price, but I’d identify a need before spending the money for a new one.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View Elizabeth's profile

Elizabeth

814 posts in 2604 days


#10 posted 11-28-2011 10:41 PM

Sounds like good advice, and probably what I need to hear! Thanks all, I’ll see how the Tormek works out for me and whether there’s anything I need to do but can’t before proceeding to a dry grinder.

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5604 posts in 2692 days


#11 posted 11-28-2011 10:45 PM

I have the Ryobi 8”, it replaced an old generic 6” that I never could get to run smooth… Don W. mentions his burnt out in a little over a year, that is not what I usually see, and I have had mine for 2 years trouble free now… I think he just got a lemon… I have always felt the fit, finish, and quality of the Ryobi is top notch. Which is NOT something you see of their stuff often. But then again, a grinder is pretty simple… I went with the 3600 rpm grinder on OneWay Manufacturing’s recommendation for a Wolverine jig. Yes low speed grinders run cooler, but with an aluminum oxide wheel, and a light touch, heat buildup is a non issue… There isn’t anything I haven’t tried to sharpen with my wolverine that has given me less than stellar results. All my turning tools are happy, and plane irons easily true up using the platform…

I DID have to drop some extra stuff into my Ryobi that varies from stock. Specifically to get the Norton wheels to work right. This is NOT a problem with the Ryobi, but rather Norton’s white oxide wheels ship with garbage bushings. I ordered a set of stainless machine bushings from McMaster Carr, and trued up my wheels with Geiger’s truing tool… Both worked flawlessly.The grinder is silky smooth, and I can go straight from the grinder back to turning without touching up with anything else… Very happy with it…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Don W's profile

Don W

17958 posts in 2028 days


#12 posted 11-28-2011 11:58 PM

what I’ve found best for buffing is just a used motor

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com