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Craftsman Jointer/Planer 6 1/8"

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Forum topic by MrChips posted 11-28-2011 01:22 AM 4319 views 1 time favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MrChips

17 posts in 2860 days


11-28-2011 01:22 AM

Topic tags/keywords: jointer craftsman motor wont run

I have a Craftsman Jointer/Planer 6 1/8” Mod: 113.262211 Serial No: 92085R0079 when I turn it on the motor just moves about 1/2” and buzzes, If I do not shut it off it will trip the 15 Amp breaker.

The motor turns freely by hand.

Sounds like a capacitor but I do not see any.

Any suggestions before I pull it out?

Thanks
Hager

-- Retired 3M'r from Austin TX, Built 20"x 30" fixed Gantry CNC, Hobby Woodworker, Always have enjoyed tinkering with cars, current hobby car is a 1987 Fiero.


14 replies so far

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okwoodshop

448 posts in 2637 days


#1 posted 11-28-2011 04:41 AM

your bearings may be frozen. I am having problems with mine and when it is cold in the shop it to freezes up. I am about replace the bearings now. try taking the belt loose from the pulleys and if the motor still freezes it is the motor, if not then probably the bearings

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Grandpa

3256 posts in 2137 days


#2 posted 11-28-2011 04:52 AM

Is it an open frame motor that dust and wood chips can get into? If it is then you might try cleaning it with an air hose. Unplug it and you night remove the end cap and blow it out. If it is totally enclosed then that should be the problem.

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MrChips

17 posts in 2860 days


#3 posted 11-28-2011 04:54 AM

I live in Phoenix AZ and the temp now is 75, so the weather is not too cold.

Also I can easily turn the motor even with the belt on, so I don’t think it is “frozen” bearings.

Does this motor have starting contacts? They may be dirty if it does, I see quite a bit of saw dust around the motor opening.

I don’t see a start capacitor does this have one and I just cannot easily see it???

Any more suggestions?

Thanks

-- Retired 3M'r from Austin TX, Built 20"x 30" fixed Gantry CNC, Hobby Woodworker, Always have enjoyed tinkering with cars, current hobby car is a 1987 Fiero.

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Grandpa

3256 posts in 2137 days


#4 posted 11-28-2011 05:06 AM

I have a motor that has some contacts in under the end cap. It has centrifugal weights that switch the contacts either on or off and sawdust gets in there. Unplug it and remove the end cap and gently blow it out. I have to do that to mine on occasion. These are not the best motors for this task but they will work with a little TLC.

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MrChips

17 posts in 2860 days


#5 posted 11-28-2011 06:27 AM

Grandpa,
YES it is an open frame motor.

I’ll try blowing it out without removing the motor first and remove the motor if that doesn’t work.

Thanks

-- Retired 3M'r from Austin TX, Built 20"x 30" fixed Gantry CNC, Hobby Woodworker, Always have enjoyed tinkering with cars, current hobby car is a 1987 Fiero.

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MrChips

17 posts in 2860 days


#6 posted 11-29-2011 02:52 AM

This morning I used my compressor to blow the motor out but it still would not start.

Removed the belt and it started right up. Hmmm The blade shaft turns really easy so that is not a contributing factor.

The instructions on the side caution about the motor stalling and causing the circuit breaker to trip if the belt tension was too tight, it is a little tight, but I don’t think too much.

It really has low torque when starting, could dirty contacts cause this????

-- Retired 3M'r from Austin TX, Built 20"x 30" fixed Gantry CNC, Hobby Woodworker, Always have enjoyed tinkering with cars, current hobby car is a 1987 Fiero.

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Stephenw

273 posts in 1847 days


#7 posted 11-29-2011 03:29 AM

I have an old 6 1/8” Craftsman jointer, but mine is a 113.206933. There is no obvious capacitor housing bolted on the side of the motor, but the data plate states that it is a capacitor start motor. There is no external capacitor, so it must be inside the motor housing. I also noted there was an oil cap on the top of each end bearing. My money is on a bad start capacitor. Take it off and take it to your local electrical motor shop.

Edit…

I just took another look. The capacitor is inside the motor housing on the rear end.

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MrChips

17 posts in 2860 days


#8 posted 11-29-2011 03:59 AM

Stephenw,

I think you hit the nail on the head. I’ll pull that motor and see what I can find.

Thanks for the input.

Hager

-- Retired 3M'r from Austin TX, Built 20"x 30" fixed Gantry CNC, Hobby Woodworker, Always have enjoyed tinkering with cars, current hobby car is a 1987 Fiero.

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MrChips

17 posts in 2860 days


#9 posted 11-29-2011 06:52 AM

Pulled the motor out and took it apart. It didn’t have a capacitor, but there was a Start Relay, not familiar with it’s use. Could it be bad? How do you test something like that?

-- Retired 3M'r from Austin TX, Built 20"x 30" fixed Gantry CNC, Hobby Woodworker, Always have enjoyed tinkering with cars, current hobby car is a 1987 Fiero.

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Stephenw

273 posts in 1847 days


#10 posted 11-29-2011 05:03 PM

Are you sure it’s a relay? If there is no capacitor, I suspect you have a split phase motor. There is a run winding and a start winding that is wound 90 degrees out of phase. The part you think is a relay is probably a centrifugal swtch. It has weights and springs that hold a set of contacts closed. As the motor spins up to speed the contacts open to remove the start winding from the circuit. Inspect the contacts for burns and pitting and that they are closed with the motor at rest. Beyond that, I recommend you take it to an electric motor shop.

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MrChips

17 posts in 2860 days


#11 posted 11-29-2011 05:19 PM

I am familiar with the centrifugal switch and there isn’t any. It is a relay, took it apart and there is a coil to energize it and a light sprint to separate the contacts after it is deenergized. I took a picture but don’t know how to include a picture here.

The contacts had some signs of arching so I’ll burnish them a little and see if thet helps also do a continuity check on the coil. that’s about all I know to do right now.

-- Retired 3M'r from Austin TX, Built 20"x 30" fixed Gantry CNC, Hobby Woodworker, Always have enjoyed tinkering with cars, current hobby car is a 1987 Fiero.

View Drew - Rock-n H Woodshop's profile

Drew - Rock-n H Woodshop

644 posts in 2153 days


#12 posted 11-29-2011 06:28 PM

Okay, if the motor runs without a load and the blades turn without a load then the problem may be the belt tension and alignment. However, on the flipside if the motor runs fine without a load doesn’t rule it out, when it is put under a load and it is still giving you issues then the problem might still lie with the motor. I would most likely have it tested. Check your pulley alignments and tension when you reinstall it and make sure you are not putting undo pressure on the pulleys.

-- Drew -- "I cut it twice and it's still too short!"- Rock-n H Woodshop - Moore, OK

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MrChips

17 posts in 2860 days


#13 posted 11-29-2011 07:42 PM

The cutter bearing were free and smooth, as well as the motor with the belt off.
Motor would not run with the belt on (at minimum tension and aligned) , but take the belt off it ran, but the sound starting didn’t seem normal.

The problem was that the contacts of the start relay were a pitted, burnished them and put it all back together and it starts and runs perfectly. Both the start and run modes sound good now.

Luckily the start relay came apart with a single screw and didn’t have to resort to the dremal and cut it open.

Now getting the motor and SW/Start Relay Module all back in with the cords trapped between the plastic housing and the cast iron frame was NO FUN.

The SW assembly HAS to go in first then the motor, NOT the motor first, I KNOW.

And the short wires between the SW assembly means that you have to support the motor pretty high up to be able to get the SW assembly in.

Also the SW must be in the ON position to go through the hole in the front side of the cast iron frame.

In hind sight it probably would have been easier if I had put the jointer on the floor upside down. Working with a mirror and a head mounted light is not the best method, but if you were a Dentist it would be a piece of cake.

SO my garage sale, non working jointer, has now joined the ranks with the rest of my resurrected power tools.

A big thanks to you all for your tips and suggestions.

Hager

-- Retired 3M'r from Austin TX, Built 20"x 30" fixed Gantry CNC, Hobby Woodworker, Always have enjoyed tinkering with cars, current hobby car is a 1987 Fiero.

View Drew - Rock-n H Woodshop's profile

Drew - Rock-n H Woodshop

644 posts in 2153 days


#14 posted 11-29-2011 08:33 PM

Great job and it didn’t cost you a thing. Now the GS price can go up since it works now.

-- Drew -- "I cut it twice and it's still too short!"- Rock-n H Woodshop - Moore, OK

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