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Forum topic by andy_P posted 11-22-2011 10:56 PM 1899 views 1 time favorited 40 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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andy_P

219 posts in 1903 days


11-22-2011 10:56 PM

I have updated this topic and am now just looking for any help or suggestions in using Sketchup.

I found a good deal on Sketchup for Dummies 7and bought it. Fanally after finishing some projects that I was working, I am concentrating on learning the program. I never did do that well learning something mechanical from the written word. I have Sketchup 8 on the computer and I was assured that the book for version 7 will fill the bill.

Bottom line is that I can use any advice, help or warnings that you all might be able to offer. I finally got to a chapter that is a “follow me” type of thing. Hopefully this will start to bring things together.

In the mean time, does anyone know why, after I draw a line, when I go to put a measurement in, it reduces the image to something too small to use. ( I draw a line lets say about 8” across my screen. When I go to the Measurement Box and enter 6”, the line becomes a 3/4” line on my monitor.

Happy Easter to all and thanks for any help.

Andy

-- Wood is a gift from God/Nature that maintains its beauty forever via the hand of a woodworker.


40 replies so far

View Towtruck's profile

Towtruck

70 posts in 1304 days


#1 posted 11-22-2011 11:30 PM

If you find such a thing, I would be interested. I tried Sketchup and it just doesn’t work for me. I’ve found some software to just feel natural, and others to be pure aggravation. I’ve never found a CAD that I liked.

-- I cut it off 3 times and it's still too short!

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andy_P

219 posts in 1903 days


#2 posted 11-22-2011 11:45 PM

Well, we’ll see if this post brings any good information. You’d think that with all that computers can do nowadays, some woodworker somewhere would have found something good and easy.

-- Wood is a gift from God/Nature that maintains its beauty forever via the hand of a woodworker.

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2343 days


#3 posted 11-22-2011 11:49 PM

ANY CAD program will have a pretty steep learning curve – ANY of them. SU is no different.

I have used different CAD apps and while my favorite in terms of intuitiveness and capabilities is Bonzai I ended up going back to SketchUp because it’s free, and it’s plugable as well as simpler in certain aspects. from my expreience SU may not be the most intuitive CAD to use, but it actually has the shortest learning curve I’ve experienced between the alternatives.

that aside, whatever CAD program you end up using you’ll still have to draw/trace your parts/geometry. these are all design tools and not reproduction tools where you can do a 1-click and turn a plan from shopnotes into a 3D representation for you to look through.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112353 posts in 2272 days


#4 posted 11-22-2011 11:50 PM

I don’t know about the simple part but lots of folks seem to like sketch up. I’ve never been able to figure it out.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Sawkerf

1730 posts in 1763 days


#5 posted 11-23-2011 12:00 AM

That “dream program” is just a dream. One price you have to pay for any CAD program is going thru the learning curve. It isn’t easy, but it’s worth the effort.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

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andy_P

219 posts in 1903 days


#6 posted 11-23-2011 12:06 AM

Well, I guess those last couple of posts say it all. Where’s my graph paper!!!???

-- Wood is a gift from God/Nature that maintains its beauty forever via the hand of a woodworker.

View jim C's profile

jim C

1455 posts in 1793 days


#7 posted 11-23-2011 12:20 AM

I was an Autocad expert in the late 80’s designing Hi-Speed Progressive dies for the stamping industry. There was no 3-D, but you could build libraries and download views of screws, springs, etc.
The views were top, side, and front view. (Precursor to 3-D)
It was very complex, but I needed it for my business.
Having said that, Sketch-up could be a great tool if I was not retired. I am not forced to make a living using it, so the little time I try to learn it is like taking piano lessons every six months. It ain’t gonna happen.
Commit yourself like a college course and you’l love it. You need to persevere.
I don’t think there is a better CAD system out there (and free) except Sketch-up PRO.
For woodworkers anyway

-- When I was a boy, I was told "anyone can be President", now I'm beginning to believe it!

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andy_P

219 posts in 1903 days


#8 posted 11-23-2011 12:31 AM

Thanks for your enthusiasm, Jim. Like you say, Sketch up is free and I guess you are right. I should just apply myself and learn how to use it. Maybe I should tweak this topic a little and ask if there is anyone that uses Sketchup on an ongoing basis and if they have any hints. For instance, when I downloaded and tried Sketchup, I found that for some reason that darned line would not stop. If I went to pick up another “tool” it would follow me up to the top “tool” bar. But then again, maybe by asking that I am just showing my stupidity.

-- Wood is a gift from God/Nature that maintains its beauty forever via the hand of a woodworker.

View crank49's profile

crank49

3465 posts in 1666 days


#9 posted 11-23-2011 12:32 AM

I started with Autocad back in 1984.
I have used it almost every day since I started.
I have used it so long I think in Autocad!
BUT
I tried EasyCad and TurboCad and several other inexpensive CAD programs.
They are all hard to work with.
Generally speaking, the more you pay, the better they work up to a point where they start to have so much power and so many features that they become incomprehensible.
Sketchup is a little different due to the fact it’s free.

Apple once had a program that was as close to intuitive CAD as anything I have ever seen.
You drew free hand then told the computer what the dimensions or parameters were and it created the CAD drawing from your sketch. Don’t know what happened to that program; it was called “Vellum” I think.

Another option is to buy an Autocad clone, like Cadopia. I have a copy of that to use at home. It was $350, but that’s a lot better than $3500 for full Autocad. The advantage of this approach is that there are a bazillion books out there for learning Autocad.

But I might be biased due to how long I have used it.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

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andy_P

219 posts in 1903 days


#10 posted 11-23-2011 12:37 AM

Well, for that kind of money, I can afford to make plenty of mistakes. All in all it seems that Sketchup is a God Sent considering the price.

-- Wood is a gift from God/Nature that maintains its beauty forever via the hand of a woodworker.

View jim C's profile

jim C

1455 posts in 1793 days


#11 posted 11-23-2011 12:39 AM

Thanks Crank49,
I’m looking into Cadopia.
Can it switch to engineering/ woodworking, fractions/decimals, and move the decimal point?

-- When I was a boy, I was told "anyone can be President", now I'm beginning to believe it!

View crank49's profile

crank49

3465 posts in 1666 days


#12 posted 11-23-2011 01:58 AM

Cadopia works exactly like Autocad so it will dimension in any unit, decimal, fractional, or architectural (feet and inches plus fraction).
It just does not work in 3D. At least, the version I have does not.
I hate 3D anyway. It’s just for creating picture shows for administrators who don’t know how to interpret a three view projection drawing.

I spend half my engineering time taking 3D drawings made by some snot nosed college dork and converting them into real drawings that the guys in the fab shop can understand.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View andy_P's profile

andy_P

219 posts in 1903 days


#13 posted 11-23-2011 02:26 AM

Crank, I’m a “no nothing” guy when it comes to what you are talking about, but I can fully understand your feelings about 3D. Give me a straight drawing with dimensions and that’s all I need. I can take that into the shop and make something from that.

-- Wood is a gift from God/Nature that maintains its beauty forever via the hand of a woodworker.

View Alongiron's profile

Alongiron

408 posts in 1388 days


#14 posted 11-23-2011 05:17 AM

My good buddy…AutoCad programs are ok but when working on yothere ur own designs you have to work each piece as you make it and record it for next time around. There is nothing wrong with a napkin a nd pencil. Just think through each part one at a time and before you know ityou will have a project for the ages.

-- Measure twice and cut once.....

View jim C's profile

jim C

1455 posts in 1793 days


#15 posted 11-23-2011 05:26 AM

crank…..andy
I can work with you guys!!!!!!!!!
HA!

-- When I was a boy, I was told "anyone can be President", now I'm beginning to believe it!

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