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Old 1923 vid on shoe's chairs and spoons - have you ever seen a 2 man plane?

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Forum topic by Dave posted 878 days ago 1017 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dave

10910 posts in 1340 days


878 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: carving tool plane carving shaping traditional video

I stumbled across this video. It shows some old methods that kept my attention. It has no sound and is in a European language for the subtitles. Ma bee Dennis can translate. The old gentlemen are making shoes, spoons and chairs. They have the biggest spoon bit I have ever seen. And I have never seen a 2 man plane. I hope you enjoy.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com


13 replies so far

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9114 posts in 1118 days


#1 posted 878 days ago

Dipping the chair pieces in the hot glue pot, the two man plane with only a planing stop holding the work in place, using a hatchet on a pair of shoes after creating the foot openings, a totally non-flat benchtop… Oh, and the work holding method / workbench used when making the shoes. Very cool stuff, Super!

And yes, that spoon bit. Clearly the sharpest tool I’ve ever seen, hollowing out shoes like that…

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

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Dave

10910 posts in 1340 days


#2 posted 878 days ago

Yep the ole check in the log cinch vice method. Simple and held very well. You made do with what you have.
The old guys make it look like second nature.
I have to fight to get my rabbet plane not to stair step.
I would trust that guys aim with me standing on the log and him swinging.
That would give the safety guys something to talk about.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View JL7's profile

JL7

5983 posts in 1465 days


#3 posted 878 days ago

Pretty amazing stuff…....they really make it look easy….wow.

-- Jeff - I have not failed. I've just found 10,001 ways that won't work.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1615 days


#4 posted 878 days ago

thanks Dave …. LOL how much do you want to have translated of the swedish words ….. :-)

the first in the film or the hole …. £€$&.... lol :-)
snickarstuga = whittling room
Gård = farm
so it basicly say a free standing shed is often attached to the farm

yes its a cool film on the site where it original has been publish there is a hole serie of old movies
with the different trades and how they did it
thank´s for reminding me of them

its becourse of the Elm the spoonbit looks so damm sharp
the elm is often use by carvers too it shuold be soft as basswood

TAKE CARE IF YOU TRY THE AXE / ADZE TRICKS :-)

Dennis

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Dave

10910 posts in 1340 days


#5 posted 877 days ago

Thanks Jeff and Dennis.
And I didnt know elm was that soft. He sure made it look easy.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1615 days


#6 posted 877 days ago

Dave remember the drill he used on the spoonbit :-)
its himself and using his bodywaight + pushing with his feet against the ground
thats why its look so easy even when its elm you don´t just cut thrugh like you
was taken a piece of butter on the bread …. you can see the axe don´t cut so easy in it
while he is chopping the form with the axe or adze and believe me they are sharp as the spoonbit :-)

Dennis

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Bill White

3185 posts in 2460 days


#7 posted 877 days ago

Snickarstuga? Well there…....Now I have a REAL name for the workshop.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View mtenterprises's profile

mtenterprises

784 posts in 1193 days


#8 posted 877 days ago

This may sound sappy but I am so pleased that someone back in 1928 had the insite to film how these things were actually made. I never knew that was how a spoon bit was uses, turn cut and scoop, turn cut and scoop more like a round gouge. Just a point of note, as I have come to understand, in Holland wooden shoes are made from willow.

This film/video reinforces the sign that I having in my shop: It is not what your shop looks like nor the age or quality of its tools. It is the quality of work that you can produce there with them that is important.
MIKE

-- See pictures on Flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/44216106@N07/ And visit my Facebook page - facebook.com/MTEnterprises

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9114 posts in 1118 days


#9 posted 877 days ago

Sign in My Shop: Bless this Mess

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View Dave's profile

Dave

10910 posts in 1340 days


#10 posted 877 days ago

Dennis I will watch it again and take care to notice your pointers. What amazes me is the speed they just go at there projects. The shoe maker uses a story stick and produces two like shoes. The spoon maker just has his spoon in his head. And they actually used a layout for the chair.
Bill good one. I wonder what is Swedish for MAN CAVE;) or Dave’s Cave;0
Mike I do love the fact they did shoot this footage. And there are strong words in the sign that hangs over your shop. I have a limited budget for shop tools and supplies. So I have chosen to buy old tools and refurb them. There is a great quality in the tools that were built then. If I was to purchase them now I would not be able to. Woodworking is a hobby and I find great fun in hand building my work. Think about the fine furniture that was built 2,000 years ago. Some of the pieces are still around. And the production of steel did not exist.
Smitty funny. I just sweep the mess out the front door of my shop. Some of the shavings make it to the cats litter box.
Thanks guys for your time and comments.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1615 days


#11 posted 877 days ago

Dave …. remember how they were photografed back then
there was no electric engine in the to hold the correct speed
and they usely was photografed with too slow a speed and when they
was shown in the cinema it was with 25 frames /sec and that makes the people
moving alot faster than they do in the real life
you can´t change it just becourse its on digital media :-)

but you are right about how fast the can make there items but remember they have made them
thousends of times during there long life in the woodshop
back then they already started in an age of 7 and even before if it was the fammily shop
back then they were thrown out to earn money to the fammily in an age of seven
ithe lucky ones was going in school every second day

the Danish word for cave is … Hule , caveman is … Huleboer but there doesn´t seems to be
a word for the mancave other than DAVE´S HULE and that cover everything from a shop to
a room where his hobby is including if it is more like a library with a very good relaxing chair
and the officedesk
sorry I can´t get you closer at the moment since I can´t remember one specific word I have heard
not so long ago

Dennis

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Dave

10910 posts in 1340 days


#12 posted 877 days ago

Dennis your my woodworking hero from across the big pond. Thanks as always. One day we will meat. And I do remember the frame rate thing. I do believe some or some television show had told me that. But as most things as I get older. I forgot…
What were we talking about.;)

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1615 days


#13 posted 877 days ago

don´t forget to drink your coffee while its still hot …. :-)

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