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RAS safety automatic return connection?

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Forum topic by bluekingfisher posted 11-13-2011 08:29 PM 1564 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bluekingfisher

1246 posts in 2446 days


11-13-2011 08:29 PM

Gent, all,

I have just repaired the auto safety return housing and bracket for my ELU 1251 RAS. I removed the housing off the saw about a year ago, unfortunately having made the cardinal sin of not making a sketch or taking a photo before removing for the repairr I can’t remember how the cable attaches to the Yoke. I remember thinking it’s a simple put back, so simple I can’t recall how it connects.

Does anyone have an image or photograph they could forward please so I can get this machine back to work.

Much appreciated. Thanks

David

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan


11 replies so far

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

5182 posts in 2661 days


#1 posted 11-13-2011 10:35 PM

Hiya David,

I’m having a little bit of a problem here trying to figure out what it is you need to do….Don’t you have a manual for the RAS? If not, I can look at my manual and see if I can try to come up with something. I think the old Craftsman and your Elu may work alike…most of the RAS do….I’ll get back to you on it…..I’ll try…..

-- At my age, an "all--nighter" is not having to get up and pee...!!!

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bluekingfisher

1246 posts in 2446 days


#2 posted 11-14-2011 12:25 AM

Hi Rick – Cancel my query, I had a break and it came straight back to me -

I finally got it, I spent the afternoon grinding and drilling a new bracket for the housing for the return spring. It was a fiddle getting it all back together again as the spring drum inside the housing is difficult to wind when under tension without the help of a third hand.
With all the hard work done I went to connect the return cable to the Yoke, I just couldn’t remember how I had undone it a year ago. I spent about half an hour and couldn’t figure it out. I wss called in for dinner, after which I posted my query, went back intio the WS and figured it out straight away. Strange but I just seemed to know where it all went, maybe it’s just mind slippage ???

The manual just just shows a picture of the gizmo on it’s own with the cable hanging loose. The manual only describes it function, not how to mount it or how it should link up as it is generally an after market accessory.

Anyway, here it is back together, note the broken cast bracket sitting next to the new made up bracket, attaching the return spring housing by means of the two allen bolts to the arm frame.

Thanks again for the offer of assistance Rick. Perhaps one day I’ll be able to offer you some help for all the previous assistance you have shown me.

BTW I chewed up the sacrificial table top with all my previous fiddling so I made a heap of replaceable inserts. Now the blade is 90 degrees to the fence. All I have to do now is return the blade to the saw kerf line should I wander off square. I should have painted it red, just to keep my hands out of the way and indicate as a danger zone.

David

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

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Belg1960

966 posts in 2531 days


#3 posted 11-14-2011 01:06 AM

David what is the broken piece with the 3 holes in it for?

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

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Rick Dennington

5182 posts in 2661 days


#4 posted 11-14-2011 02:14 AM

WOW David…..I’m glad you got it figured out. My old saw doesn’t show anything like what you described or posted. I guess there is a difference in the saws…..lol. Mine is nothing like that…if it is, I can’t see it unless it’s in the housing on the arm….nothing on the outside…..that’s a new one on me…..:) Anyway pal, glad you’re back in business (we hope). I learned something new today about the different set-ups for tools from 2 different countries….

That looks like throttles on a boat motor…...that puppy ought to really go….:)

-- At my age, an "all--nighter" is not having to get up and pee...!!!

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bluekingfisher

1246 posts in 2446 days


#5 posted 11-14-2011 10:41 AM

Morning Boys, I hope you both had a good weekendl?

Pat, the broken bit is original old bracket which held the return spring housing onto the saw, i.e the grey box with the + & – sticker on it. The housing is cast aluminium. The broken bit was once part of the housing, it sat proud on an raised section and was the part holding the housing to the saw via the two allen bolts you see in the photo. Itsnapped off so I made a new piece which now holds the housing onto the frame as per the photo. I was just showing the broken bit to show thow I had made the replacement part really. The triangular shaped peice of metal now holding the housing on to the saw is the manufactured replacement bracket I made up from a cut off from a mobile machine base.

I had to drill, tap and countersink the inside of the housing as there is little space inside, therefore the screw heads would have fouled the return spring drum. i used M3 cone head bolts with split washers so it wouldn’t come loose. I had to gring the nuts on the outside too as they fouled against the arm of the saw and wouldn’t sit flush.

Rick – The housing with the “motorboat throttle” lol is the automatic safety return spring. It’s an aftermarket accessory which was fitted to the saw when I bought it. Unfortunately, the guy I bought it from had snapped it when moving it in his shop. It really is a production shop accessory, not really required unless you are conducting repetative work. When you pull the yoke carriage over to make the cut the spring pulls the yoke back behind the fence out of the way. Like I say, not really required but as I had it I thought I would have a go at making the repair. I spent the rest of the weekend sorting out all the little jobs on it which if not done would have bugged me, like repairing the “unsticky” badges and cleaning off spilt paint marks and making some replacement inserts. The saw is all finished and raring to go now. Time now for the next project…................Dust collection system

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

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ScottN

261 posts in 2146 days


#6 posted 11-14-2011 01:55 PM

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bluekingfisher

1246 posts in 2446 days


#7 posted 11-14-2011 05:34 PM

Hey thanks Scott, I got it all sorted out now, bit of a steep learning curve trying to understand the RAS. I’m still no expert on it but I now have the basics

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

5182 posts in 2661 days


#8 posted 11-14-2011 09:15 PM

Hey bud,

I’m really glad you explaned that gizmo to me…I have never seen one, or heard of one before…I could see where that device would come in handy for returning the saw behind the fence automatically instead of pushing it back like mine…I’m guessing you set the spring mechanisim so it won’t return it too quickly before you’re ready? Pretty niffty idea, I guess….lol. Just don’t “hotrod” the thing and let it get away from you….:))

I told you the RAS will be the hardest machine in your shop to get set up properly….didn’t I ?......:)


Now…on to more good projects….......!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

-- At my age, an "all--nighter" is not having to get up and pee...!!!

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bluekingfisher

1246 posts in 2446 days


#9 posted 11-15-2011 10:34 AM

Morning mate, Yep quite a handy wee gizmo, no it’s not on a 200ILB draw strenght, it just returns slowly if you were to let the handle of the yoke go, it doesn’t zip out of youir hand. I won’t be building up any bicep strenght by doing too many reps.

I wouldn’t have bought one (replacement part 70 quid) just as it was crying out to be repaired.

I’m off now for my yearly ELS biannual training (first aid) it’s across town so best dash.

How are you getting on with that Tool chest?

D

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

5182 posts in 2661 days


#10 posted 11-15-2011 04:55 PM

Mornin’,

On the subject of the tool chest: I’m still trying to decide what route I want to go…..buy or build.
All of the metal ones (mechanics tool chest) are cheap-made, and thin-walled…Most of the slides don’t work right, and are out of sync…Chinese crap…;) I really like your brown cabinet that you built, and the configuration of the drawer set-up…Looks just like what I’m after…..So…if I can’t find a metal chest, I’ll probably wind up building my own, and I think it would be a lot better and stronger…now if I can just come up with a plan…...lol. I’m not very good at this, you know, and only a beginner…!!!!!

-- At my age, an "all--nighter" is not having to get up and pee...!!!

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bluekingfisher

1246 posts in 2446 days


#11 posted 11-16-2011 03:03 PM

The tool chests were easy to build, I never drew up plans, this was one of my big failings back then, just made rough sketches and used what I had to hand as I went along, rather than buying specific timber or hardware.

I have cleared a lot of drills bits and the like from the top of my chest so I was going to build a small 2 or 3 drawer chest for all of my measuring aid, protractors, squares etc as they keep getting knocked about in the bigger chests.

If you need dimensions I can measure mine up for you to give you a perspective on the various chests in relation to each other.

The lower chest carcass is 3/4” ply with 1/4” harwood edge banding while the two upper chests are 1/2” ply. The drawers are all hardwood on the two smaller chests while the drawers for the lower chest is 1/2” ply with 1/4” hardwood edge banding.

There was a plan for a similar stacked chest a few years ago in either Woodsmith or ShopNotes magazine (can’t remember which right now) I have the issue at home so if you need me to investigate I’ll haul it out. I’m sure you’ll have it in your extensive library lol.

Mine are about 10 years old now and crammed with stuff so probably hold more than they should. This will be the case untill I can get around to building a wall tool cabinet for my hand tools (years away yet) I don’t know if my metal machanic chest will still be going strong in ten years?

similar Keep me posted bud.

D

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

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