LumberJocks

Makita 1900B question

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Belg1960 posted 11-12-2011 02:40 PM 3624 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

966 posts in 2525 days


11-12-2011 02:40 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Hi guys, I have a Makita handheld plane that I got from my father who no longer had the instruction manual. I got some new blades but need a little help on how they need to be installed, I got that the 3 bolts and 2 screws need to be removed but just how does the blade need to sit in the slot,how much blade should be exposed and any tips on how to get them square would be much appreciated.

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!


11 replies so far

View plantek's profile

plantek

312 posts in 2259 days


#1 posted 11-12-2011 06:32 PM

Have you searched the Internet for a manual.
I’m always surprised how often I come across instruction/user manuals.
Try searching with the term “Makita [model] user manual”.
It’s worth a shot…

-- If you want it and it's within reason... It's on it's way!

View Loren's profile

Loren

8295 posts in 3107 days


#2 posted 11-12-2011 07:39 PM

It should be set up just like a jointer, with the blades ever so slightly
proud, at their most protruding point when rotating the cutterhead,
of the level of the back (non-adjustable) table.

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

966 posts in 2525 days


#3 posted 11-12-2011 08:49 PM

Plantek, just had to add manual to the search as I tried just makita 1900b and that got me to as many as I wanted to buy and a parts list. Found one that was complete. Thanks for the help.

Loren, forgive me but I have never owned a planer so is there anyway you could show me a picture of what you mean as its not really sinking in? Thank you

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

View bluekingfisher's profile

bluekingfisher

1246 posts in 2439 days


#4 posted 11-14-2011 11:06 AM

Hi Pat – I have never tackled that job either. I have a Dewalt planer, I cut through the cord while planing one day, severed the cord and fryed the blades (2 of them) it was actually the second time I have used it, that was about two years ago. That’s another repair job needing done. If you figure out how to replace the blades, please let me know, it may inspire me to take the job on

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

966 posts in 2525 days


#5 posted 11-14-2011 02:12 PM

David, I plan on calling the service center and asking how much of the blade should be revealed and how to accomplish this as the manual shows some pics that don’t match my version exactly but are close. I’m thinking if I get a large speaker magnet and lay it across the lower plate which is aluminum so it wont stick but will attract the knives it might get me even. Maybe Loren will give me some more advice and we can both learn.

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2310 days


#6 posted 11-14-2011 06:31 PM

Hi Pat—

I have a 1900B which gets occasional use. It comes with three gizmos that make the whole knife thing a piece o’cake. One is a plastic block with a wignutted metal plate which clamps the blade and dictates the angle for honing. Next is a T-handle socket which fits the knife mounting screws.

The other is a plastic block with a plastic fence on it and it is used to register the cutting edge parallel to the backing piece. It’s been a while since I’ve done all this, but my memory is that it is a well designed accessory.

Thinking, youthful as I was years ago, that more was better, I sold my 1900B and bought the 4” version which I never could get to cut as well. So I sold it and bought another 1900B. The thing leaves a glasslike surface. It’s one of Makita’s crown jewels in my opinion.

I suggest you pursue the gizmos to get the most out of your tool.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2310 days


#7 posted 11-15-2011 03:21 AM

Here’s how the block/fence assembly works:

The sharp edge goes to the fence, bevel up, and then the two back fingers are adjusted via the screws so the little tab touches the back of the block. Voila! Instant setup!

Now about the other one with the bevel, well, that’s a 9mm nutdriver that I used to remove the knives, and I really like this tool, and that little knife jig is really cool, and there’s another one, with a bevel, and I’ll be thinking that I know what that does, but in the meantime did I tell you that’s a 9mm machines screw? The T handle wrench isn’t a good choice when the bolt is long and the thread is fine, and once you get that out and adjusted then you take that other little jig, the one with the bevel on it, oh heck, it’s time to go home for the day, I hope we’re having burgers and chips and bevelled eggs so I can spread some on my face because I don’t know what that dag blag furshlugginer little bevel diablo does. But the bolts are 9mm, did I tell you that?

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

966 posts in 2525 days


#8 posted 11-12-2015 12:54 PM

Lee, just seeing this now that a reminder for this thread popped up on my Facebook page. Really appreciate the info you shared so long ago. I did get it sorted with some further trail and error and a few emails with a friend who had one. Pat

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

966 posts in 2525 days


#9 posted 11-12-2015 12:56 PM

And by the way are those bolts 9 MM? ;-)

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2187 posts in 940 days


#10 posted 11-12-2015 12:59 PM

A word of caution:

Don’t know what you’re using it a rough tool for carpentry use, not a for but it is not a ww’ing tool.
Don’t ever put it to something like a table top.

IOW, it will not take the place of a hand plane.

I have one the only thing I use it for is skimming rough lumber to see the grain patterns.

I posted this because it might save you from ruining something.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

966 posts in 2525 days


#11 posted 11-12-2015 07:43 PM

I use it to plane the sides of doors and like you for rough lumber to flatten enough to be able to put it thru the planer. Thank you for the info.

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com