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Tips & Tricks: Woodworking Terminology

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Forum topic by MsDebbieP posted 11-10-2011 11:49 AM 2848 views 1 time favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2915 days


11-10-2011 11:49 AM

Topic tags/keywords: terminology dictionary tips tricks

Let’s create a mini woodworking-dictionary:

Woodworking Terminology
  • name it
  • define it
 
(also add links to helpful blogs etc that are related to the topic)

Gateway to all Tips & Tricks Topics
 

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)


19 replies so far

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WoodWoman

2 posts in 1153 days


#1 posted 11-10-2011 03:25 PM

Mortise & Tenon Joint : a woodworking joint that is made by inserting a tenon into a mortise.

Mortise: The cavity, whether square or round which accepts the fit of a like size and shaped tenon to form a joint.

Tenon: A projection at the end of a piece of wood that fits into a like size and shaped mortise to form a joint.

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MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2915 days


#2 posted 11-10-2011 04:37 PM

board foot: thickness x width x length divided by 144 equals board feet
here is a good discussion re: measuring when purchasing

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Gregn's profile

Gregn

1642 posts in 1738 days


#3 posted 11-10-2011 06:57 PM

Cook: To set aside a glue up while glue cures.

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

View 404 - Not Found's profile

404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 1724 days


#4 posted 11-10-2011 11:23 PM

a few for the timber merchants

PAO = Planed all over

PSE = Planed square edge

cube = 12 board foot

wide plank = 9” and over at a premium

deal (red deal/white deal) a pine plank 2” or under by 10” or under (red = scots pine, white = norwegian pine)

View Mark's profile

Mark

1788 posts in 2029 days


#5 posted 11-10-2011 11:28 PM

2×4 = 1.5”x3.5”

-- My purpose in life: Making sawdust

View Rick's profile

Rick

7360 posts in 1788 days


#6 posted 11-11-2011 11:07 AM

”Golden Ratio” Used to Design & Layout MANY Items including Woodwork. It also appears Naturally in Nature.

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Wesh Love Spoons and Golden Ratio Caliper.

-- How long is a Minute? That depends on which side of the Bathroom Door You're On!

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7952 posts in 2807 days


#7 posted 11-11-2011 10:39 PM

Wood magazine had one those little tools featured a few months back…

I made a few of them…

They’re very nice!

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

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MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2915 days


#8 posted 11-13-2011 06:14 PM

Heartwood – the centre part of the tree, typically harder than the rest of the tree (if I understand correctly)

Sapwood – the outer part of the tree (where the sap runs) and often softer than the rest of the wood (if I understand correctly) and usually a lighter colour

(See Sodbuster’s comment #17 below for better information)

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

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MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2915 days


#9 posted 11-13-2011 06:21 PM

Quarter sawn / Rift Sawn / Plain or Flat Sawn – how the lumber is milled.
Here is a great discussion re: the differences

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

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MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2915 days


#10 posted 11-14-2011 02:32 PM

Kerf – the cut size created by the size of the saw blade.

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

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MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2915 days


#11 posted 11-15-2011 03:53 PM

Cramp – A frame with an adjustable part, used to hold pieces together

Clamp -A tool with a screw at one end, used to hold wood together

Vise -A clamping devise with two jaws

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

3748 posts in 2489 days


#12 posted 11-15-2011 04:31 PM

I hope nobody posts that tedious glossary of twenty woodworking terms that begins: “Drill Press: a device for grabbing metal with sharp edges and throwing it across the room…..” Egads, it’s been posted enough times already….

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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SeaWitch

149 posts in 1149 days


#13 posted 11-15-2011 05:24 PM

Caul = a wood strip used for clamping. A Caul is often planed so it is slightly bowed so that when it’s clamped down on the ends, the center maintains contact with the piece being clamped on. It’s usually used on several boards being glued together edge to edge so they all stay flat across the top.

-- When you are asked if you can do a job, tell 'em, 'Certainly I can!' Then get busy and find out how to do it.”   Theodore Roosevelt

View ryno101's profile

ryno101

380 posts in 2419 days


#14 posted 11-16-2011 09:22 PM

One that I always forget regarding frame & panel construction…

Rails – The horizontal members of the frame Stiles – The vertical members of the frame

-- Ryno

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Sodbuster

40 posts in 1806 days


#15 posted 11-16-2011 11:42 PM

MsDebbieP

As to hardness and strength of heartwood vs sapwood, the answer is “sometimes”. Extractives in the wood sometimes create a color difference is some species, but in others, none at all. These extractives may cause a slight difference in compressive, shear, and hardness readings, but not a major amount. Color and resistance to decay, in some species, is the main difference.

Source – Textbook of Wood Technology, Panshin and DeZeeuw, pg.228 -231.

A lot of the old timers thought the sapwood was much weaker or softer. Just didn’t hold up to scientific testing.

-- M Clark, Georgia

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