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gaps and cracks .. any repair tips?

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Forum topic by chrisstef posted 11-08-2011 02:21 AM 1145 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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chrisstef

11478 posts in 1758 days


11-08-2011 02:21 AM

Topic tags/keywords: gaps cracks filling question

So ive been working on and off on a football carved from a green piece of Maple. Over the past month iver got it to a shape im happy and since it started off as a goof and now has turned into a project ive got some issues. It has checked and cracked .. im talking about 1/8” gaps split through 4” of wood. I bought some gorilla super glue but looking at it im gonna need a lotta super glue.

Long story short … how do i fill the gaps and cracks to both give me a decent end product that will accept a BLO finish and not continue to get a whole lot worse.

BTW if any one else lives close to CT or in CT i hope you go your power back; and while i think CL&P’s management kinda boned us again be sure to thank the crews working 16 hour days.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty


17 replies so far

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chrisstef

11478 posts in 1758 days


#1 posted 11-08-2011 03:04 AM

heres a precrack photo .. and a gentle bump

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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cloakie1

204 posts in 1307 days


#2 posted 11-08-2011 04:00 AM

epoxy is what i would use….you can also mix it with some sawdust off the project to get the same colour match

-- just get stuck in and have a go!!!

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chrisstef

11478 posts in 1758 days


#3 posted 11-08-2011 03:22 PM

Cloakie, any suggestions on what brand of epoxy to use?

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 2425 days


#4 posted 11-08-2011 05:17 PM

Try wood puty.

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker

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JamesVavra

288 posts in 2068 days


#5 posted 11-08-2011 05:30 PM

I agree with CR1 – it’s going to keep checking until it’s dry. Most of my experience is from turning green wood, so your mileage may vary.

-Thin superglue will help the existing cracks from getting a lot bigger, but new ones will form.
-To help it dry slower, at a more uniform rate, you can put it in a paper bag covered in shavings.
-Weigh it now (a postal or kitchen scale is handy) and note the weight. Weigh it occasionally, and when the weight stops dropping, it’s dry.
-Another drying option is the microwave. For a piece that size, give it about 1 minute on high. It will get warm and the moisture will steam out. Let it cool, and then repeat. Weigh it each time, as above – when the weight stops dropping, its dry.
-I’ve also heard that boiling the piece for a couple of hours works very well, but I’ve never used that technique.
-Once it’s dry, some of the cracks may have closed up a bit. -If they are big, mix 5 minute epoxy (either with a filler, coloring agent, or clear) and fill them. Painter’s tape around the edges of the cracks make cleanup easier. -Smaller gaps can be filled with sawdust and superglue. -The epoxy will not take BLO. The super glue will, but not the same as the surrounding wood. With the varying colors of that piece, you won’t notice much.

You’ve got some time if this is for a fantasy league trophy, so the slow dry in the paper bag might work. If it were me, I’d use the microwave.

James

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chrisstef

11478 posts in 1758 days


#6 posted 11-08-2011 08:55 PM

Thanks for the replies all, i think im going to try the microwave trick. The wife wil be out with the girls on Friday night so i can get away with it lol. Ill let it check away and fix it once its done moving around. Then ill move on to the epoxy to fill in the gaps and cracks. Thanks for all the advice and knowledge.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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willie

465 posts in 1206 days


#7 posted 11-09-2011 10:21 PM

I’ve used fiberglass resin to fill cracks and defects in projects with great success. It seems to be flexible enough to move as the woods epands and contracts without breaking or separating. I have used it on small holes to repairing large cracks or missing pieces. Easy to work and permanent.

-- Every day above ground is a good day!!!

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a1Jim

112934 posts in 2329 days


#8 posted 11-09-2011 10:23 PM

I second the epoxy route

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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steviep

232 posts in 1399 days


#9 posted 11-09-2011 11:00 PM

Glad to see you recovered from the first natural disaster. The second (Miami vs KC) is still stinging around these parts!

PS i would go with the epoxy

-- StevieP ~ Micheal Tompkins - you were not here on earth long but left a giant mark on us. RIP Brother

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chrisstef

11478 posts in 1758 days


#10 posted 11-10-2011 12:44 AM

ive been looking at different epoxies at WC … any suggestions? I was also thinking about tinting it with either some ink or coffee grounds .. ill definately do a trial run this weekend on it.

Stevie .. yea it was a rough week all the way around both without power and the old chiefs throwing up a huge stinker. On the bright side … Uconn hoops open up on Friday.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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crank49

3524 posts in 1723 days


#11 posted 11-10-2011 01:16 AM

I like “System 3” epoxies.
Caution, if you get the slow setting version it has to be heated to cure.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

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chrisstef

11478 posts in 1758 days


#12 posted 11-10-2011 01:56 AM

thanks crank i think ill stay away from the slow setting version. I got the acceptance from the wife to put the football in the microwave so ive run it through about 8 times now and have seen the weight drop 0.2 lbs so far.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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chrisstef

11478 posts in 1758 days


#13 posted 11-10-2011 01:58 AM

what kind of finish will be compatible with the epoxy? or should i just color the epoxy and finish as usual?

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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crank49

3524 posts in 1723 days


#14 posted 11-10-2011 09:24 AM

I don’t think you can stain epoxy, but you could color it while it’s still liquid.

Or, as others have said, you can mix some saw dust from your project with the epoxy to create a filler that matches the wood around it.

Some folks mix other things in the epoxy to create contrast; like turquois or onyx.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

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chrisstef

11478 posts in 1758 days


#15 posted 11-16-2011 10:52 PM

Thanks for all the help on this one gang … heres the link to the repairs made … http://lumberjocks.com/chrisstef/blog/26510

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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