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Vapor Barrier and Wall Covering

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Forum topic by jackthelab posted 1019 days ago 1083 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jackthelab

306 posts in 1319 days


1019 days ago

I am finishing a garage/workshop. Standard construction with 2X6 sidewalls, insulation in stud pockets and standard vapor barrier. Wall currently covered with OSB. My question is has to do with a small portion of the wall at the base where there is about 1.5’ of concrete block showing. Currently uncovered. I have found a great source of the old style metal siding. It was removed from the interior of a barn on a farm in our area. I want to use this material as a wainscoting on the side walls. Since there is no vapor barrier or wall covering on the exposed concrete block, can I cover that uncovered area with the steel siding and not run into problems with moisture? Any ideas would be helpful. Thanks for checking out the pos

-- Dave in Minnesota - If it ain't broke, improve it!


10 replies so far

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ajosephg

1850 posts in 2187 days


#1 posted 1019 days ago

Since the cost would be minimal, if it were me, I’d seal the blocks on the chance that the metal siding might rust.

-- Joe

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jackthelab

306 posts in 1319 days


#2 posted 1019 days ago

Hey

Thanks for the idea. What would you use to seal the block?

-- Dave in Minnesota - If it ain't broke, improve it!

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David

196 posts in 1290 days


#3 posted 1019 days ago

You definitely should seal the concrete if the metal is a type that will rust. There are a number of companies selling concrete sealer, I’ve heard good things about Drylok, planning on trying it in my basement one of these years.

Keep in mind that in general with paints, sealers, etc, you’ll get what you pay for. My preference is to buy the most expensive stuff. It’s usually better quality and the extra $5-10 per gallon isn’t going to break the bank.

-- Perilous to all of us are the devices of an art deeper than we ourselves possess. --Gandalf the Grey http://davidwahl.org/category/woodworking/

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ajosephg

1850 posts in 2187 days


#4 posted 1019 days ago

I was afraid you’d ask that question.

Somebody makes a mastic like stuff that is used to seal the inside of concrete basement walls to keep out moisture. I’d slather that all over the blocks, and then glue Styrofoam insulation to the blocks.

-- Joe

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jackthelab

306 posts in 1319 days


#5 posted 1019 days ago

Excellent ideas – thanks a million.

-- Dave in Minnesota - If it ain't broke, improve it!

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David

196 posts in 1290 days


#6 posted 1019 days ago

I’d love to see some pictures when you’ve got it all done.

-- Perilous to all of us are the devices of an art deeper than we ourselves possess. --Gandalf the Grey http://davidwahl.org/category/woodworking/

View dpop24's profile

dpop24

115 posts in 1196 days


#7 posted 1019 days ago

Get this at your local Home Depot for $23 per gallon or $105 for a 5 gallon bucket.

-- If it ain't broke, take it apart and find out why

View NY_Rocking_Chairs's profile

NY_Rocking_Chairs

500 posts in 2224 days


#8 posted 1019 days ago

Another question is how much of that block wall is below grade on the outside? Anything above grade won’t really have much moisture leakage, it’s only below grade you really have to be concerned with, and if there are good french drains in place and the ground is well sloped you won’t even have much below grade leakage.

My last house was 156 years old and the basement leaked like a sieve in a couple places until we corrected the roof drainage system. Couldn’t even get it dried out enough to put on the Drylok.

The new house we just built they put a silver epoxy-like coating on the outside of the walls, the interior walls they coated with Drylok and then put up an insulation blanket.

-- Rich, WNY, www.nyrockingchairs.com

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Grandpa

3078 posts in 1302 days


#9 posted 1019 days ago

I would use block filler to begin with. that will give a smooth filled surface for the sealer. Drylok is a good product and it will work. I am not saying it will seal the Titanic but it will keep moisture out. I would not glue the foam directly to the blocks because mildew and mold can and will grow behind it because you are trapping cool air on that side. I would use furring strips and allow some air flow behind the foam. This can be seen on the InterNACHI web site under their insulation section.

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jackthelab

306 posts in 1319 days


#10 posted 1018 days ago

Hey

Lots of good ideas. I didn’t mention that the floor construction is slab on grade. The cement block foundation is pretty traditional but the only area that shows on the inside is about a foot and half of block. Thanks so much everyone – will post pictures as I get things finished. The only problem is that is a shop “ever finished”?

-- Dave in Minnesota - If it ain't broke, improve it!

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