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Making a chisel (slick)

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Forum topic by planeBill posted 11-04-2011 06:00 AM 1165 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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planeBill

480 posts in 1061 days


11-04-2011 06:00 AM

Hello fella’s, I would like to ask a question that hopefully someone can help me with. I want to make a slick for my boatbuilding project I am going to finally get going on as soon as my wife is satisfied with her(our) furniture.
I have some perfectly sized pieces of spring steel, which is new, that I would like to use to make a 3” slick. My question is, would spring steel, which I was told was 5160 (?) steel, make a good chisel (slick)? If so, what should I be aware of as far as tempering, quenching, etc…? I have already ground a 30 degree bevel on it, very slowly with a bucket of cold water beside the grinder to keep it cool and I did it a very little at a time and at no time did the steel ever become too hot to touch with my bare fingers. The bevel, which is still in the rough, was the easy part but I figured I would ask about the suitability of the material before going on with the shaping and drilling and tapping for the handle.
Thanks in advance for any advice.

-- I was born at a very young age, as I grew up, I got older.


4 replies so far

View BobE's profile

BobE

28 posts in 1604 days


#1 posted 11-04-2011 07:41 PM

I’m interested in making my own drawknife out of some scrap high carbon steel I’ve acquired. So, I’ve been researching the same sort of stuff the last couple of days. I’m not sure I’m qualified enough to answer, but I’ve been finding a lot of good information on knife making forums.

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planeBill

480 posts in 1061 days


#2 posted 11-05-2011 12:39 AM

Good idea Bob. I should have thought of that

-- I was born at a very young age, as I grew up, I got older.

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1281 posts in 1650 days


#3 posted 11-05-2011 02:12 AM

Springs are not left as hard as a cutting tool. You will need to reharden and temper so it doesn’t really matter if it overheats a bit while shaping. The grade should be fine. Going to take a lot of heat and a lot of water to do something that big.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View planeBill's profile

planeBill

480 posts in 1061 days


#4 posted 11-05-2011 03:12 AM

David, Thanks for that info. It’s not a very big piece so my little BBQ kiln should work.

-- I was born at a very young age, as I grew up, I got older.

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