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Forum topic by dmmflys posted 995 days ago 8497 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dmmflys

43 posts in 995 days


995 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: workbench wall mounted workbench wall mounted bench folding bench folding workbench question

I trying to find a way to build a wood workers workbench similar to the one posted here http://lumberjocks.com/assets/pictures/projects/6371-438x.jpg however, I want to attach it to a wall with hinges so it can be lowered against the wall to allow room for my wifes car when its not needed. Sound relatively easy until I add in the fact that it has to be very sturdy and have very little or no swaying when using the work bench. It also has to fold down and NOT up because if it folded up it would block a window. I’ve looked though most of the workbench posted under “projects” and couldn’t find anything like it. My first idea is to attach a ledger board to the wall and then some heavy duty ball-bearing hinges to connect the work bench to the ledger board so when the table is up the ledger board will support the weight of the back of the table. I haven’t yet come up with a good way to support the front … hinged legs, hinged angle brackets, hmmm. Anyone got any good ideas?
Dave


13 replies so far

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Murdock

107 posts in 1082 days


#1 posted 994 days ago

I think it would be difficult with a bench top that heavy to mount it to the wall securely. Lifting it up and down could also be difficult depending on exactly how thick and what wood you make the top out of.

I know several people personally that have folding wall mounted benches but the heaviest top on any of those is a 3/4 ply on top of 2by stock..

For your design, I agree with the idea of the ledger board and heavy duty hinges that do not already have a lot of ‘play’ in them.

For legs, rather than having them fold maybe you want to consider building them up and simply moving them out of the way when they are not being used, then mortise them into the top. A well fitting mortise and a set of legs built so they themselves don’t rack should support the top fairly well. I am thinking something in the shape of H. Basically something like a traditional workbench, you would just remove it every time you wanted to fold away the bench.

If you want the legs to fold, I would recommend coming up with a locking mechanism for them, either built into the hardware or something added on. I don’t think I have seen store purchased leg hardware suitable for this sort of thing.

Sorry I couldn’t be more help, but now that my response is here to bump this up maybe someone else will have some ideas.

-- "Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new." - Albert Einstein

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live4ever

982 posts in 1608 days


#2 posted 994 days ago

Hmm, a true workbench that stands up to pounding, planing, and other hand tool work is going to be difficult in that configuration. But as an assembly/power tool table, no problem.

Page 22 of the Nov 2011 Wood magazine has basic plans for a simple 3/4” ply top that is supported by 2x legs, and it folds down. Don’t think this would offer the stability you’re after.

There is also this commercial product…pricey and again not sure if it would stand up to being used as a true woodworking bench.
http://www.benchsolution.com

-- Optimists are usually disappointed. Pessimists are either right or pleasantly surprised. I tend to be a disappointed pessimist.

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dmmflys

43 posts in 995 days


#3 posted 994 days ago

Murdock
I didn’t really think about having mortised legs that would just remove thats a good idea the only problem I can think of with that is being able to have enough room to slide them under the bench do to the fact (or at least in my preliminary plan) that if that the bench is attached to the ledger board with hinges it would prevent you from raising the table past 90degrees = no room to slide the legs under. I like the idea though I’m going to ponder it some more maybe theres a way to get it to work.

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dmmflys

43 posts in 995 days


#4 posted 994 days ago

Live4ever As far as the “benshsolution” its cool and I would be willing to give it a shot if it was a LOT less $$$. I’ll have to check out that Wood issue maybe it will help foster a few new ideas thanks for the heads up.

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crank49

3337 posts in 1569 days


#5 posted 994 days ago

Support it on hydraulic cylinders. Long srtoke jacks.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

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tr33surg3on

21 posts in 1022 days


#6 posted 994 days ago

What sort of woodworking are you planning to do with it? That is a cabinetmaker’s bench designed to hold work (doors, cabinet panels, etc.) securely for use with hand tools (i.e. bench planes). It needs to be bulky so it doesn’t move around under stress and because the bench itself is really a giant clamping system (using bench dogs and the vises) in various positions. I personally can’t see a way to do it without fundamentally altering the character of the bench.

My understanding is that much power-tool work can be done with essentially a door fixed on a couple of saw horses (a work-site bench). Also other woodworking disciplines can be done with different style benches (carving, lutherie, boat-building). Torsion box benches and Japanese style workbenches are some options you might want to look at. If the vises are what you’re looking for, there are also options such as vise stands, jaw horses or Workmates.

Also, Aldren Watson’s “Hand Tools: Their Ways and their Workings” has an appendix with plans for a fold-up closet workbench that is a similar idea to what you describe, though it is much smaller and more limited than the bench in the picture.

-- Tim -- Tools to make tools to make...it's tools all the way down.

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Cityslickr

2 posts in 980 days


#7 posted 980 days ago

Hello all. I’m new here and new to woodworking. I too would like to create a workbench much like this. I was coming up with ideas for the stability of the legs. My idea would involve many hinges though. I was thinking of a way to utilize a support board at the base of the legs that would be hinged so that would collapse and fold with the legs for storage. My concern is that the hinges would have to be lockable (is that possible?). My theory is that with the design in my head the bench would have all four legs and still be sturdy. Perhaps I’m such a new craftsman that my idea is vain. But do any of you seasoned vets believe something like that could work? Hopefully my rant has helped carry this thread to further discussion. And hopefully this made some sense.

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darinS

373 posts in 1465 days


#8 posted 980 days ago

Going a little outside of the box, could you make a folding bench that is on wheels? This way you could fold the bench up and move it to the side so the car could be parked, then rolled out when needed. I think it was last month’s issue of Wood magazine that had a bench like that. Then again, maybe what I am thinking of is what live4ever is referencing. Not at home to check the magazines to see.

-- If at first you don't succeed, skydiving is not for you!

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dmmflys

43 posts in 995 days


#9 posted 979 days ago

Cityslickr
No thats a good idea I’ll prob incorporate something like that into my design too but instead of four legs I’m still just using the front two. the back of the bench will be supported by the wall/ledger board. I have not yet read last months Wood mag but if your just looking for a movable and fordable workbench take look at this it maybe what your imagining ofcourse with some of your own mods. And no I think no idea is bad sometimes ideas that come from those who know only a little or even nothing about a subject lead to the greatest break thoughts because there minds aren’t lock into a certain way of thinking.
thanks guys

http://www.woodworking.org/WC/Garchive01/3_27workbench.html

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PurpLev

8476 posts in 2246 days


#10 posted 979 days ago

I’ve actually had one that I built using a laminated bench top+vise and 3 door hinges that attached the benchtop to a 2×4 that I mounted on the wall (actually mounted it on a 3/4” plywood that I used to cover the cement wall for easier mounting of the benchtop and other cabinets/tools. you can see it in my workshop page here http://lumberjocks.com/PurpLev/workshop in the 2nd picture (albeit without legs -you can either use swing legs that can fold sideways, or use sawhorses).

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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dmmflys

43 posts in 995 days


#11 posted 979 days ago

PurpLev
Thats basically what I had in mind except I was thinking to have the bench top lift up so the back sat on the top of the 2x ledger for added strength and support, however, maybe thats over kill ,... how stable is your bench is there any wiggle at all? Would you have any problem planeing on it? I would love to see more pics when you get it finished.

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Cityslickr

2 posts in 980 days


#12 posted 979 days ago

@PurpLev- I like the saw horse idea. It simplifies the build and allows for more functionality and space reserve. And dmmflys, thanks for your feedback. Perhaps I’ll build both. This community is beginning to grow on me quick.

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PurpLev

8476 posts in 2246 days


#13 posted 979 days ago

dmmflyes: I haven’t had much chance to hand plane on it since soon after building it we moved to a new location where I did not have as tight of a space anymore and ended up building a free standing workbench that used the same benchtop + vise that was previously hung on the wall:

Click for details

In retrospect, the fact that the benchtop was secured to the wall made it fairly rigid for side to side movements (hand planing) (I used 3 indoor door hinges that were pretty heavy duty). The only thing is since it’s hinged is that it can lift up in certain situations (never happened to me). As long as you can secure the top to the legs properly I think you’ll have as rigid a workbench as can be considering the space restrictions. If I had the same space I’d do the same thing all over again without a 2nd thought.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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