LumberJocks

Tips & Tricks: Preventing "Catches" (Lathe)

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by MsDebbieP posted 996 days ago 2367 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2758 days


996 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: lathe tips tricks

what are your tips/tricks re: tool catches / creating gouges when working on the lathe?

(also add links to helpful blogs etc that are related to the topic)
 

Gateway to all Tips & Tricks Topics
 

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)


14 replies so far

View DS's profile

DS

2131 posts in 1018 days


#1 posted 996 days ago

Hmmm… thinking back on the times I’ve experienced catches on the lathe and a few things come to mind;

Sometimes my tool was dull. Dull tools tempt me to “press harder”—this usually will cause a snag or two.

Sometimes my approach to the work was incorrect. (Tool rest placement, blade angle to the work, or lax grip, etc.)

Sometimes I try to do more with a particular tool than I should, mostly because I am too lazy to set that tool down and pick up the proper tool. For example, trying to use the wide gouge to get into a tiny cove and catching the edge.

So…
Keep the tools sharp. Don’t try to force a cut with a dull tool.
Ensure the tool rest is at the proper height and that you grip isn’t too lax.
Use the proper tool for the proper steps.

and that’s my 2 cents.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

19313 posts in 2449 days


#2 posted 996 days ago

The skew chisel can provide some excellent cuts like beads and fine smoothing but get one of those tips in the wrong place and boy watch things fly.lol

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2897 days


#3 posted 995 days ago

First allow the heel of your tool to make contact with your work piece.

Then gradually tilt the edge of the chisel into it while still keeping contact with the heel.


-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View DS's profile

DS

2131 posts in 1018 days


#4 posted 995 days ago

@Grumpy: I have only ever done that once—and that was enough. Lesson learned.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1291 days


#5 posted 995 days ago

For me, NOT using a skew chisel. I use one of those Sorby Skewchigouges (?), which seems to help.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3650 posts in 2261 days


#6 posted 995 days ago

DS251—I, too, have only had a problem once with a skew … EVERY TIME I USE IT! The skew is my nemesis, but I refuse to surrender to it … with practice, I am certain I can master it (maybe) LOL.

Seriously, your point about dull tools is dead on … I have a friend who has been turning for 70 years (he is 84), and his mantra is “The most dangerous tool in the shop is a dull tool”.

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View DS's profile

DS

2131 posts in 1018 days


#7 posted 995 days ago

Getting the tip of the skew into a piece of Maple turning at 1000rpm is enough to get your heart racing for a while.

After checking the digit count is still 10, assessing the damage to the work piece is the next anxiety ridden chore.

Then, how do I fix THIS mess, comes up.
Luckily I was working a paint grade piece that day and bondo came to my rescue.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3342 posts in 2558 days


#8 posted 995 days ago

Cut “downhill”. Trying to outsmart the grain in a workpiece is a task that will go wrong every time. How do I know this?
Oh yeah! Sharp is NOT an option. I still have the first bowl I turned with stock tools out of the store, not sharpened, etc. I sanded my a$$ offffffffff. (Well, almost. I still have my a$$.)
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View peteg's profile

peteg

2816 posts in 1421 days


#9 posted 995 days ago

You have said it all
“Rub the bevel”
use the correct tool, ie, dont try to turn the inside of a bowl with a spindel gouge
The skew is probably one of the most versatile tools in your kit, again rub the bevel & lift up into the cut with the edge approx 45* to the work (keep the bevel in contact all the time)
Oh, and a lot of practice till it becomes second nature. These are the basic things everybody will tell you
As for the rest, well there are hundreds of books on every facet of turning, everybody has thier own take on it.
Relax, practice, experement & most of all be confident & enjoy your turning.

-- Pete G: If you always do what you always did you'll always get what you always got

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2897 days


#10 posted 994 days ago

Beginners may tend to use a scraping action. You’re less likely to get a gouge.

But you have to do a lot more sanding than the shaving action.

It’s best to practice the habit of shaving.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3650 posts in 2261 days


#11 posted 994 days ago

cr1—Those ‘memorable moments’ sure leave an indelible impression, don’t they!

And it does happen to all of us. The other night, I was watching a video by Richard Raffan (arguably in the world’s top echelon of turners) where he got a catch with his skew and ripped a pretty deep spiral in a wooden egg he had in a jam chuck.

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View SteveN's profile

SteveN

21 posts in 2840 days


#12 posted 981 days ago

Keep your tool sharp and ride the bevel. If you often cheat a little and cut from the edge to reach tight points expect catches. Its also a good idea to stabilize knots and bark inclusions with a little CA glue when turning thin objects or natural edges.

-- Steve Nearman, FurnitureRepair.net, ProRestorers.org, Fredericksburg, VA

View peter blair's profile

peter blair

34 posts in 1248 days


#13 posted 972 days ago

These are all great tips. I do however try to follow them all myself but still get an occasional catch just as I start a cut at the top edge of a bowl while trying to finish the inside. I watch a lot of videos but still can’t seem to get the correct start into my feeble mind. I see Bob Hamm with the handle way right at the start and then a rotation of the tool while lifting the handle but when I try that . . . wow the gouge digs in and heads toward the outside in a hurry!
Anyone have any tips that might help me get these last few final fine cuts started?

Pete

-- Pete

View D_Allen's profile

D_Allen

495 posts in 1382 days


#14 posted 971 days ago

I’ll share a tip I got from a master turner recently. I explained my problem of the bowl gouge catching when trying to take a slice from the rim, as has been explained here. He said to place the gouge level with the center and the flute pointing inward. The tool should be angled in such a way that the bevel is pointing toward the headstock. The image below is somewhat representative, except that the flute should be facing inward and vertical to the tool rest. As the point is advanced into the edge the flute is then rotated upward and the tool nose is pivoted inward. I tried this that evening and almost instantly I had a stream of shavings flying out of the cavity…just like I see in videos. It should be noted here that this works for bowls where the cut is concave. It does not lend itself well to deep hollowing. Also, this is an Ellsworth grind and I use a fingernail grind. I suppose this one would work too.

-- Website is finally up and running....www.woodandwrite.com

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase