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Fixing a big mistake

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Forum topic by pwalter posted 10-31-2011 03:20 AM 1116 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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pwalter

79 posts in 2050 days


10-31-2011 03:20 AM

Not sure if I should be posting this question into this section, so sorry in advance. I am building 2 cherry tables, One sofa/hall table and the other is a coffee table. I inlayed a curly maple border into the table top of the hall table and while trying to do the same to the coffee table I wasn’t being as careful as I should have been and took a huge chunk of cherry wood out of the table top where I shouldn’t have. Is there any way to fix a 1/2 inch circle 1/8 inch deep from my router bit?


14 replies so far

View ChunkyC's profile

ChunkyC

856 posts in 2720 days


#1 posted 10-31-2011 03:25 AM

Can you plug it, and sand it flush? That’s a tough one, right on the top where it will show. Been there done that, I’m the king of dumb mistakes.

c

-- Chunk's Workshop pictures: http://spadfest.rcspads.com/thumbnails.php?album=135

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ChunkyC

856 posts in 2720 days


#2 posted 10-31-2011 03:27 AM

Can you make the top the bottom? Might be a way of hiding your sins??

-- Chunk's Workshop pictures: http://spadfest.rcspads.com/thumbnails.php?album=135

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8523 posts in 3114 days


#3 posted 10-31-2011 03:28 AM

since router was involved I can only assume the ‘missing material’ is no longer available to be glued back in? if so the only thing you can do is try to fine another cherry piece with matching grain and patch it. OR (and this is a big OR since I don’t know how that top is made) – could you flip that top and use the otherside thus hiding the error on the bottom unseen side of the table top perhaps?

of course you can always “redesign” that top and create a new inlay design into it to cover up that mistake by making it a design element – but then you won’t have a matching set with the other table.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2078 posts in 2105 days


#4 posted 10-31-2011 03:33 AM

or make the same design but proportionally larger ?

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View ChuckC's profile

ChuckC

821 posts in 2401 days


#5 posted 10-31-2011 03:54 AM

This sounds like an opportunity to add some more inlay. I think we’ve all had unplanned design changes along the way. Sometimes they become our favorite part of the project :-)

View pwalter's profile

pwalter

79 posts in 2050 days


#6 posted 10-31-2011 04:00 AM

Here is a picture of the problem that is going on.

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2078 posts in 2105 days


#7 posted 10-31-2011 04:17 AM

Dang, grace ! Just change the sheets and don’t tell anyone next time.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

3338 posts in 3362 days


#8 posted 10-31-2011 04:26 AM

If you can flip it to the bottom that would be easiest. However I’d be inclined to do the inlay just as the rest of the project and add a moderatly contrasting piece to this area. I don’t think tha t ruins a piece, it gives it distention. The question is is the project for you or a customer? That would really sway the decision process.

If you want to plug it with cherry you would really have to pay attention to grain and color. If you have a cutoff from that board you could be in luck.

-- "Our past judges our present." JFK - 1962; American Heritage Magazine

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pwalter

79 posts in 2050 days


#9 posted 10-31-2011 04:33 AM

Thanks for everyones input, the only problem with just flipped the table over is the fact that I was smart enough to edge route the table top before trying to do the inlay. Go figure, I guess that makes 2 mistakes LOL I am thinking of just making it wider and inlaying a thicker piece of curly maple, but do you all think 1 3/4 inches would be to thick?

View GerryB's profile

GerryB

69 posts in 2048 days


#10 posted 10-31-2011 06:32 AM

Consider adding something dramatic. A coin (this year’s) or a piece of bronze, or silver?

-- The pursuit of excellence is gratifying and healthy. The pursuit of perfection is frustrating, neurotic, and a terrible waste of time. Edwin Bliss

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

5181 posts in 2660 days


#11 posted 10-31-2011 07:47 AM

What I think I’d try is this: Take and sand the whole table top down below the mistake…..Start with some 60-80 and work your way up to 320 (if it’s solid cherry). I’d try to get it down past the bad spots, sand it all smooth, and start over, being more careful this time…:) I’d also do it with a ROS, or a wide belt drum sander, if you have one…..if not, the ROS will work…...good luck….

-- At my age, an "all--nighter" is not having to get up and pee...!!!

View tedth66's profile

tedth66

458 posts in 2655 days


#12 posted 10-31-2011 11:02 AM

How about a wider inlay than you originally planned?

-- Ted

View pwalter's profile

pwalter

79 posts in 2050 days


#13 posted 10-31-2011 01:24 PM

I think I have decided to rip out that board and glue a new one in its place. Just gotta match the edge profile and inlay. Thanks everyone for your help

View StumpyNubs's profile

StumpyNubs

6856 posts in 2266 days


#14 posted 10-31-2011 02:02 PM

You’re done. Throw it on the firewood pile…

Or, you may consider a drilling it out and calling it a peephole!

-- Subscribe to "Stumpy Nubs Woodworking Journal"- One of the crafts' most unique publications: http://www.stumpynubs.com/

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