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Who are the masters? I want a list!

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Forum topic by StumpyNubs posted 10-29-2011 04:32 PM 2645 views 1 time favorited 112 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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StumpyNubs

6194 posts in 1458 days


10-29-2011 04:32 PM

Topic tags/keywords: resource greene and greene shaker modern traditional arts and crafts rustic victorian

When I ask “who are the true woodworking masters?” many of you would immediately say -”You mean besides Stumpy Nubs?” And while it’s funny that you’d say that, it wouldn’t make for a very useful list.

Here’s what I’m looking for- Who are the true masters of their skill? Which men and women are widely thought to be the very best?

To make our list, they have to have been professionals for many years, the kind of people that every woodworker would absolutely LOVE to study under. They don’t have to be living as long as a sufficient amount of the knowledge is preserved in their work, books, videos, etc.

Of course, I’ll start the list with a couple of the obvious…

The Greene Brothers- Their work took Craftsman style to an entirely new level. Anyone interested in that type of furniture should read anything they can on these guys!
Sam Maloof- What can you say about him, just amazing. If you are into making chairs, learn as much as possible about this man!

I don’t want to list too many of my favorites because that’s up to you.

Why make this list? Because any aspiring woodworker can use it to seek out the work and techniques that many of these masters have left to be found on the internet and in various publications. For example, had I never heard of Curtis Buchanan, I’d never have searched You Tube and found a treasure trove of his fascinating videos on chair making…

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com


112 replies so far

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StumpyNubs

6194 posts in 1458 days


#1 posted 10-29-2011 04:42 PM

You decide. There’s no plaques being given out here, just a list to give people ideas on who to search out for expertise.

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

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jim C

1452 posts in 1756 days


#2 posted 10-29-2011 04:45 PM

Jim C comes to mind.

-- When I was a boy, I was told "anyone can be President", now I'm beginning to believe it!

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Alan

443 posts in 2062 days


#3 posted 10-29-2011 05:01 PM

OK, I think we have some “masters” here in lumberjocks. I start with a couple – GaryK, Trifern, and Andy.

-- Alan, Prince George

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ShaneA

5306 posts in 1256 days


#4 posted 10-29-2011 05:17 PM

For me, its the Greene brothers, and then everybody else.

Nakashima
Krenov
Maloof
Stickley

There are so many more, several LJs come to mind as well. Some amazing woodworkers here.

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StumpyNubs

6194 posts in 1458 days


#5 posted 10-29-2011 05:28 PM

I’m cutting dovetails with a giant straight 5/8” router bit this morning- and no jig. Does that make me a master or a moron? :)

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

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ShaneA

5306 posts in 1256 days


#6 posted 10-29-2011 05:33 PM

I think you know the answer Stumpy!

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a1Jim

112104 posts in 2235 days


#7 posted 10-29-2011 05:35 PM

I think the term master woodworker has different meanings to different people. Making a list of my own I would call the craftsman on it individuals who do or have done outstanding work. I think having such a list is helpful.

Here are some other interpretations of “Master woodworker” from wiki answers

The term “master craftsman” comes from the old guild system. In it, someone entering the trade would apprentice to, usually, a master craftsman for a number of years. (In today’s environment the apprenticeship is often done at a community college, where the instructors serve as the masters.) After passing your apprenticeship you become a journeyman and can work in the trade. After a period of years you can take a master’s examination and become a master craftsman. The test normally involves making something you’ve never made before; the item you made was called the “masterpiece.” (And now you know why it’s called that.) This is how it’s still done in Europe, but in America where we never had a guild system a master is basically whatever the master says it is.

The word master refers to the expert, the one who is expert in the field is called as master. The master woodworker is called when he does his work with lot of creativity and combines the woodworking business ideas in the work. Normally he delivers the products with the lot of creativity and the dedication, it is seen in the products that he sells

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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BarbS

2434 posts in 2743 days


#8 posted 10-29-2011 05:37 PM

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StumpyNubs

6194 posts in 1458 days


#9 posted 10-29-2011 05:51 PM

To me (and for the sake of our list) “master woodworker” is a person to whom you would pay a significant amount of money to train under. Then you would consider it a resume’ enhancement to say you did.

Take the afore mentioned Curtis Buchanan. He’s a master chair maker. I have heard chairmakers say “I took a class from so-and-so, who trained under Curtis Buchanan…” Sam Maloof started out hiring a couple of shop boys. Before long he had a waiting list of people who wanted to pay HIM for the privilege of working for him.

If I had a list of “masters” like that, I can tell you I would search out every bit of information I could- try to learn from those who I may never get to meet in person.

Only on Lumber Jocks could you ask for a list of “masters” and get more debate over the definition of the word “master” than over who should be included on that list! :)

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

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rrdesigns

494 posts in 1843 days


#10 posted 10-29-2011 05:54 PM

Frank Strazza-http://www.homesteadheritage-woodworking.com/craftsmen.html

Dan Mosheim-http://dorsetcustomfurniture.blogspot.com/

Martyn Brewer (aka Britboxmaker)-http://lumberjocks.com/BritBoxmaker

-- Beth, Oklahoma, Rambling Road Designs

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JuniorJoiner

446 posts in 2098 days


#11 posted 10-29-2011 05:56 PM

I will nominate goldenhands here on lumberjocks. we have pm’ed much in the past, and his work speaks for itself. He is a master at what he does.
Dilo Marcio Fernandino , and MARCO AURELIO R. GUIMARÃES would also fir the category of master here on lumberjocks.

I would be honored to train with any of them

-- Junior -Quality is never an accident-it is the reward for the effort involved.

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Jorge G.

1526 posts in 1133 days


#12 posted 10-29-2011 06:16 PM

Just go to the college of the redwoods site, you got a ready made list there.. :)

-- To surrender a dream leaves life as it is — and not as it could be.

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StumpyNubs

6194 posts in 1458 days


#13 posted 10-29-2011 06:37 PM

Leave it to JG to come on here and spoil our fun….

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

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a1Jim

112104 posts in 2235 days


#14 posted 10-29-2011 06:43 PM

How about a link Jorge

I’d like to see who I missed on my list

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Bluepine38

2876 posts in 1743 days


#15 posted 10-29-2011 06:54 PM

The two that I would list as masters that I would like to train under are Roy Underhill and Norm Abrahm. I
have their books and have watched their shows, and they have helped me along my slow journey. There
are also many here on LJ that have helped me and others learn and quietly shown us an easier or better way
to do work, or have just proven that the work can be done and challenge us to also do it. Thank all of you
for your help and Stumpy for being unable to just let us set around and making us do something.

-- As ever, Gus-the 75 yr young apprentice carpenter

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