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How to identify types of wood and proper storage

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Forum topic by Anthony M. posted 999 days ago 1517 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Anthony M.

2 posts in 999 days


999 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: resource question

My father passed away about six months ago and my family and I are trying to organize his work shop. He had acquired a lot of lumber over the years (approx. 500+ lbf) and really never had the time to make anything with it. Unfortunetly the different types of lumber are all mixed up in a big pile and I dont know how to identify the species of lumber. I do know there is a mix of oak, cherry, black walnut, and maybe some maple. Is there any books or websites that I can reference? Also whats the best way to store it?


8 replies so far

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ShaneA

5242 posts in 1193 days


#1 posted 999 days ago

If you were provide pics of the different types, you could get help with the identifying process. As for storage place, one that is dry and out of the elements. If it is on a concrete, you may want to elevate it from the concrete. You may also consider separating the levels of the wood. Stickering, it will help keep an even air flow over it.

View flippedcracker's profile

flippedcracker

91 posts in 1048 days


#2 posted 999 days ago

made me think of this:

But like Shane said, I’m sure most people here could tell you the wood with just a picture.

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richgreer

4522 posts in 1669 days


#3 posted 999 days ago

If all you are talking about is oak, cherry, black walnut and maple, those are pretty easy for any of us to recognize. With just a little help, you can quickly learn to recognize the difference.

As an FYI, there are 2 basic types of oak: red and white. There are several variations of maple. An experienced eye can tell the differences. It is kind of important if you want to sell it. In general, white oak is more expensive than red oak and sugar maple (hard) is more expensive than silver maple (soft). Note – soft maple is still a relatively hard wood.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

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Anthony M.

2 posts in 999 days


#4 posted 999 days ago

Thanks for the info. I’ll try to post pictures soon, but it may be awhile because I am busy with work and classes. I plan on saving the wood for future projects because it would be too expensive to replace and it holds a sentimental value to me. Once I’m done with my nursing degree this spring, I plan on taking furrniture making classes because I took drafting and metal shop in high school instead of woodshop.

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reggiek

2240 posts in 1865 days


#5 posted 999 days ago

You can also look up the woods in question on the web and there will be pictures galore….especially of the species that you mention. That said, it would be just as easy for a seasoned woodworker to identify the woods for you. Most WW in the US are very familiar with the woods you mention.

My condolences on your loss, and it is very good to hear that you plan to use that wood he collected for some nice things.

-- Woodworking.....My small slice of heaven!

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ShaneA

5242 posts in 1193 days


#6 posted 999 days ago

Yeah, you know we expect completed project photos now? Best wishes.

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richgreer

4522 posts in 1669 days


#7 posted 999 days ago

Before posting pictures, get down to some fresh wood by running a piece through a planer or jointer or cleaning it up with a hand plane.

Wood that has been setting around for a long time can get dirty and it is harder to tell what it is.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

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WDHLT15

1065 posts in 1071 days


#8 posted 998 days ago

Also, take a razor blade or razor knife and make a clean slice on the end grain. Then, take a close-up picture of the sliced area to show the annual rings, pore structure, and other identifying features. That is more important than a general pic of the board.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

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