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Forum topic by Jeff82780 posted 10-21-2011 02:56 AM 893 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jeff82780

204 posts in 2454 days


10-21-2011 02:56 AM

left the garage open accidently on a day when it was raining. My new jointer had rust spots all over it. i did manage to remove them , but there is some stains from the rust that i cannot seem to remove. ive tried 800 grit wet sandpaper with wd40, but no luck. anyone have any idea how these stains will go away? thanks

-Jeff


6 replies so far

View thiel's profile

thiel

374 posts in 2752 days


#1 posted 10-21-2011 03:02 AM

Try “Rust Free” from Woodcraft. Sometimes comes in a pack with T-9 stuff. I think it’s just strong acid, but it seems to do the job on stuff like that..

-- Laziness minus Apathy equals Efficiency

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

5314 posts in 3172 days


#2 posted 10-21-2011 03:30 AM

Wear it off by jointing wood for several projects :-)

A wipe with a citric acid soaked cloth may remove much of the remaining rust. Then dry thoroughly and wax. I like using the heat gun to ensure it is dry and to ‘set’ the paraffin wax after its been rubbed on.

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7143 posts in 2374 days


#3 posted 10-21-2011 06:40 PM

If you are going to use ”Rust Free”, MAKE SURE YOU APPLY IT TO THE RAG FIRST. Do NOT spray the iron directly. I made that mistake and actually created more staining spots than I removed. It is a rather strong acid and will clean the rust, but it does leave the iron a duller gray in color.

On the plus side, I understand that ”Rust Free” actually helps protect the iron surface in the long run, making it less likely to rust. But don’t forget to paste wax it well after using it.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View DS's profile

DS

2151 posts in 1880 days


#4 posted 10-21-2011 08:21 PM

I am always absent-mindedly setting my drinking glass on the bed of my jointer. (Hazards of a small shop) Seems like it rusts up almost instantly.

“Rust Free” is good stuff, and for me, is the cleaner of choice. Just keep in mind that it actually etches the steel, so, in effect, you are etching the rest of the bed to match where the stains were. Wierd, I know.

I try to clean and wax all my tools every few months to help avoid this. I am actually more concerned with the tools function than its appearence. A ring shape etched in the bed isn’t a show stopper for me as long as the jointer still runs true. Besides, I’m pretty sure I’ll set my drinking glass there again next week. :-D Silly me.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8523 posts in 3108 days


#5 posted 10-21-2011 08:34 PM

I just use green scotch pad – no chemicals for light surface rust. then buff it with johnson paste wax as a protective coat to keep rust at bay.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Bernie's profile

Bernie

416 posts in 2297 days


#6 posted 10-22-2011 05:23 AM

I use Flitz, a cream like liquid that washes the rust away (but I not sure where to buy it anymore – my supplier is out of business). Another product that has been good is “Nevr-Dull” found in most automotive stores. It’s a wadding soaked in it’s subtance. Just tear off a piece and scrub out the rust spots. If any spots remain, they are weaker and a fine sanding should finish the job.

-- Bernie: It never gets hot or cold in New Hampshire, just seasonal!

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