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Forum topic by John's Woodshop posted 10-20-2011 03:44 AM 2213 views 1 time favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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John's Woodshop

347 posts in 2763 days


10-20-2011 03:44 AM

Have any of you Garage Shop Woodworkers ever removed your overhead door and closed in the opening? If so, got any pictures? I am looking for ideas for shedding the overhead door and filling it in with an insulated wall with a double door entrance or something like that.

Thanks!
John

-- John -- Racine, WI -- Woodworking..."It's not just a Hobby, it's an Adventure"


17 replies so far

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1386 days


#1 posted 10-20-2011 03:58 AM

I’ve done it for others. They liked it.

I have considered doing it for myself. My main concerns are two things: 1) In my case I would need/want to saw- cut the concrete drive on both sides of the new door so that it looked like it never was a garage door. 2) I loathe pinned one side double doors because they do not seal well, but with a t-astragal I would not have the use of the full 5 or 6 feet of width. If I do it, I will have a 4’ wide single door made.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View willie's profile

willie

465 posts in 1200 days


#2 posted 10-20-2011 04:07 AM

Sorry I can’t post any pics but I closed in an overhead door. I had two 7×9 overhead doors and removed one. Frame it in to match your exterior wall. I put in an insulated steel 36” door close to the remaining overhead door which leaves me with some useable wallspace to the corner. I used 3” screws on all my framing in case I ever want to put the other door back. Insulate the hell out of it. It makes a huge difference having the small door to get in and out without opening that big door and losing all my heat.

-- Every day above ground is a good day!!!

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

4892 posts in 1369 days


#3 posted 10-20-2011 04:23 AM

I have done this but I’m certainly planning on it. I’ve got a 3 bay with a 1 bay and 2 bay overhead door. There is NO other exterior door which drives me crazy. I am planning on framing the single bay so that it can be easily reversed (as cj suggests) and putting the disassembled door in the crawl space.

One thing that I look forward to is getting rid of the overhead tracks so I can place a ceiling fan.

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali

View BentheViking's profile

BentheViking

1755 posts in 1310 days


#4 posted 10-20-2011 04:36 AM

Interesting post…I have another post going here and this is a bit of extra things to think about in relation to that

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

4892 posts in 1369 days


#5 posted 10-20-2011 04:51 AM

This idea has been a hard sell to the wife. I cam understand her point but…..

There is no outside access other the overhead doors. The family has a habit of raising the door and leaving them open all day. Even when the weather is nice like now all the leaves blow in and the bugs love the lights. The Mosquitos like me.

I know that I will never pull my truck into the single bay as long as I own the house.

It has to be easily reversible.

My garage door has no windows and the hinged door would thus allowing more natural light.

When the weather is too hot or too cold I still have two large “warm” walls and when the garage door goes up it gets cold real quick.

To me it is a no brainer

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali

View tom427cid's profile

tom427cid

294 posts in 1217 days


#6 posted 10-20-2011 08:26 AM

It’s not a garage(was used as one) it’s a barn. Had barn doors,they were a bit draftylol. I found a salvage place and bought two 36” entry doors with side lights and built a casing inside of the original opening.I normally only use one door but once in a while it’s nice to have a 72” opening. I left the barn doors so now in the cold weather it seems to break the wind and keep draughts to a minimum.
tom

-- "certified sawdust maker"

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 2419 days


#7 posted 10-20-2011 03:03 PM

Thats a idea, John.

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker

View Brian Havens's profile

Brian Havens

194 posts in 1852 days


#8 posted 10-20-2011 10:28 PM

I have been kicking around this idea for a long time. In my case, I would replace the rollup with a double set of carriage doors. I would have done this long ago, except that I am not sure how much longer we will be in this home. I got the idea for the approach I would use from Fine Woodworking issue #216, Winter 2010/2011. As this method is potentially reversible, simply filling the existing opening, I may decide to do it anyway. I could restore the rollup door, and take the carriage doors with me when I move!

If I do replace my rollup door with carriage doors, I will make them in the same panel style as roll up doors, so that the style blends in. (The irony here is that the panel styles on rollup doors mimics the original style of carriage doors.)

One other issue I did consider is whether this would be considered “obsolescence”, which in real estate appraiser jargon means that there would be a reduction in the appraised value of the home because it is obsolete in function. My wife, who is a real estate appraiser, said she would take value away if any of the bays in the garage were not accessible, but if I replaced the double rollup door with two sets of carriage doors, I would be OK. As such, the plan would be to change to carriage doors, but temporarily bolt one bay closed to form a pseudo wall.

-- Brian Havens, Woodworker http://brianhavens.com

View John's Woodshop's profile

John's Woodshop

347 posts in 2763 days


#9 posted 10-20-2011 10:35 PM

Hi Brian,

Dumb question, I know it’s dumb but humor me. How do you get in the garage? I have no service door so whatever I do to the garage door opening, I have to be able to get in there without letting out too much of my precious heat. Nice looking doors by the way!

Thanks!
John

-- John -- Racine, WI -- Woodworking..."It's not just a Hobby, it's an Adventure"

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

1743 posts in 1668 days


#10 posted 10-20-2011 11:45 PM

I have a roll up door in my garage/workshop and I do not know why one would want to get rid of it. Just leave it closed and it becomes a wall. Insulate it and it is an insulated wall. I see your issue of not having a small service door up there in Racine, I used to live in Racine myself, is there a place to just add a service door somwhere and leave the roll up door in place?

-- In God We Trust

View John's Woodshop's profile

John's Woodshop

347 posts in 2763 days


#11 posted 10-21-2011 12:15 AM

Hi Jim.

No, there is no place for a service door and that is the problem.

John

-- John -- Racine, WI -- Woodworking..."It's not just a Hobby, it's an Adventure"

View twoblacklabs's profile

twoblacklabs

203 posts in 1438 days


#12 posted 10-21-2011 12:37 AM

I feel your pain. Take a look at my blog entries and maybe you can get a few ideas. Mine is still a work in progress. Good Luck.
http://lumberjocks.com/twoblacklabs/workshop

-- If You Haven't Got the Time to Do It Right, When Will You Find the Time to Do It Over?

View Brian Havens's profile

Brian Havens

194 posts in 1852 days


#13 posted 10-21-2011 04:15 AM

In my case, I am only blocking one of the double carriage doors, so the other would provide an entry. Since I do have alternative access, I was planning on having the door locked from the inside, but I suppose an externally operated lock would also work.

In the FWW article, one of the bays had a double carriage door, and the other bay is framed out and takes a standard entrance door. If you do not care about the obsolescence, then you can simply frame in the opening and add whatever door/widows yo want, but if obsolescence is a issue, just frame it is such a way that it can be reverted with minimal effort if you sell your home.

Personally, I cannot stand my roll up door. The ceiling in my garage is 8’ (no attic), so the rails are so low that they block significant wall space. I would gain about double my wall space by losing the rollup.

So many ideas, so little time….

-- Brian Havens, Woodworker http://brianhavens.com

View russv's profile

russv

262 posts in 1915 days


#14 posted 10-21-2011 04:57 PM

hey John, I see we are neighbors. :>)

i have done garage door conversions twice.

I will say first, closing in the opening will be a huge savings when heating (and) cooling the garage.

a warning though. The first time I did this was in Gurnee, IL. After converting the opening to a big window and walk in door (this was a double door opening), the building inspector showed up and gave me a $600 fine saying that it didn’t meet code because it wasn’t a garage any more without a garage door. He classified it as living space. so, check with your local inspector first. Since I moved to Wisconsin i find them to be a little more home owner freindly. i have pics of my conversion somewhere and will look for them.

5 years ago, I sold that home and moved to Wisconsin. There i had 2 single doors garage. I was only renting the house therefore didn’t want to do anything permanent. Also, during the summer I want to open the door for more light and fresh air. What I did there was build an 2×4 8’ foot wall with 1/4” plywood skin on the outside and insulated it. if you look at the opening of your garage door, you have enough space on the outside of the opening to slide this wall in and not interfere with the door opening and closing. I slide these walls in for the winter and pulled them out in the summer. The whole time the overhead doors remained functional.

I recently bought a home in paddock lake and have a double door and a single door here. My plan is to build the wall sections in 4’ increments so as to make it easy to put in and take out with the seasons. I do caulk the seams to help seal it from drafts but that is cheaper enough each winter. for summer months i will have screen partitions i put in to keep the bugs out.

russv
paddock lake, WI

-- yknotwood.com: where to go because you don't want no stinking plastic!

View russv's profile

russv

262 posts in 1915 days


#15 posted 10-21-2011 05:02 PM

John,
one more thought. you can make one of the 4’ petition frames with a door so you can still get in and out.

let me know if you need more details.

russv
paddock lake, WI

-- yknotwood.com: where to go because you don't want no stinking plastic!

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