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Delta 36-979 TS

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Forum topic by BuyoMasilla posted 10-18-2011 07:32 AM 10009 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BuyoMasilla

102 posts in 2008 days


10-18-2011 07:32 AM

Good Evening Fellows,

I am looking at upgrading my table saw and a co worker has this model delta saw (36-979). It is a contractor saw and seems to be in good shape. The fence is a delta, imitation Biesmeyer you may say, where it stands maybe 3 inches tall and is about 4” wide with the center a bit lower than the rounded edges. I has a few extras like 0 clearance blade cover, and a dado one as well. The splitter was not installed when I looked at it today but appeared to be plastic covering the blade one with a couple of the “toothy wings” extending backwards.

There are casters on the base, the table I estimate at 30 inches deep and 36 to 40 wide with room for another 12 to 18 on the right hand side. It is cast iron through. This would be a great improvement over the direct drive firestorm I have now.

Any thoughts on the worth of this saw?

Thanks for reading, Mario

-- Dreaming of the day I might joint two pieces of wood square..........


26 replies so far

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knotscott

7208 posts in 2836 days


#1 posted 10-18-2011 11:02 AM

The 36-979 was one of Delta’s most recent full size left tilt contractor saws (27” deep), and is generally well regarded for an older style contractor saw with an outboard motor and no riving knife. Sounds like it has the Delta T2 fence, which is very regarded as a good value. Does it have steel wings or solid cast iron? (IIRC, the 979 had steel wings, and the 980 has cast iron wings….it made about $100 difference in retail). These sold in the $500-$600 range, so I’d think $275 to $350ish would be fair depending on condition, and which wing material it actually has. If it’s much more than that you start getting into range of a newer updated saw with an inboard motor, riving knife, warranty, dealer support, etc.

With proper alignment and good blade selection, this could be a nice saw IMO. Good luck and please keep us updated (with pics!)

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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BuyoMasilla

102 posts in 2008 days


#2 posted 10-18-2011 03:53 PM

Thanks for the reply Knotscott. The Delta in question is the one with the cast iron top (on the right). I did try to toss a picture in my entry from some found on line (possibly like you did) but fell short on skills.

At the risk of being redundant, Thanks!, your assessment is what I was hoping for. You cover some of the potential cons and described the saw much better than I did. As I mentioned, what I have right know has a direct drive on the blade, I believe that the belt between power and blade, though and extra part/step, is a good thing. With the cast iron and wider table, this saw is much more solid than my little BD firestorm. She does have a tenoning jig (manufactured one) and the inserts I mentioned, but I don’t know that I can or want to go much over 300 on it (which I think would be a pretty darn good deal). Back to the riving knives which apparently this saw predates, can one be installed? I suppose a splitter on an insert may also be an option.

Knotscott, if you care to comment again, I’ll read it. Mario

-- Dreaming of the day I might joint two pieces of wood square..........

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knotscott

7208 posts in 2836 days


#3 posted 10-18-2011 04:40 PM

You’re welcome Mario. Yes, a belt is a good thing IMO…they help reduce vibration, and in the event the blade gets overloaded the belts tend to slip as opposed to overloading the motor coils. You’ll also find that the induction motor is much quieter and has more torque…plus the motor can be converted to 220v if you have it, which helps balance out the amp load allowing for better amp flow during peak demands.

There is one aftermarket riving knife (and blade guard) that I know, and it just might fit that saw. It’s called the BORK, and is made by fellow woodworker Bob Ross, of Walnutacre Woodworking. He’s a great guy to deal with, and guarantees your satisfaction with a 100% refund if not happy. I have one on my Shop Fox cabinet saw, and have been really happy with it….here’s my LJ's review of it.

I think $300 would be a nice deal, and is fair to the seller IMO….could still be a nice deal at $325ish if necessary (only you can decide what your cutoff point is). Contractor saws are a little tedious to align, but the previous owner may already have it dialed in, so if it travels well, you might not have to bother….definitely check it once it’s setup. Definitely a nice upgrade from your current saw….much heavier and more stable, more operating room, more usable power, better reliability, and likely more accurate too. I’d think there would be some owners of that saw here, as they sold quite few through Lowe’s, Amazon, and other dealers.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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ShaneA

6471 posts in 2059 days


#4 posted 10-18-2011 04:56 PM

I remember when I upgraded from direct drive to a contractor saw. Talk about a great day! If you buy the saw in the $300 range, I imagine you will be happy, and woodworking on the ts will be a lot more enjoyable, accurate, safer, and quiter. good luck, and update us if you get it.

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BuyoMasilla

102 posts in 2008 days


#5 posted 10-23-2011 06:37 AM

Good Evening Fellows,

I have gone ahead and picked up the Delta 36-979 TS. Got it to the garage and tried to do a little cleaning.

When I ran the motor, the belt was rubbing against the plastic housing. Loosened the four bolts and moved things around a bit which stopped the problem with the blade at ninety degrees, have not tried the forty five degree, will do that later.

Took some pictures which I will try to embed/interject into this note. The case/housing looks nice, removed some sawdust from the inside with the shop vac and with a light cleaning, the saw looks OK.

As mentioned earlier, there was a tenoning jig which was thrown in with the saw.

There was also a height measuring digital gauge, different inserts, a featherboard and push stick .!
http://i1198.photobucket.com/albums/aa455/fdezmario/TSbladefeatherboard.jpg!

I’m including a view of the motor/rear of saw, and am trying to point to an apparent issue with the small rod like piece which holds and hinges the saw’s motor. There is a bit of slop/play on that part which may have cotributed to the seeming misalignment of the belt.

In closing, a couple of questions. Should I be concernced with the play on that motor mount/hinge part?

What is a good product to clean and lubricate the trunion screws controlling blade height and angle?

Thanks for reading, I look forward to your responses.

Mario
PS, for whatever reason, the photos are auto cropped when they make it into the writing.

-- Dreaming of the day I might joint two pieces of wood square..........

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knotscott

7208 posts in 2836 days


#6 posted 10-23-2011 11:51 AM

You might be able to add a washer or tighten it up more if it concerns you, but I wouldn’t give the spacing in the motor mount much thought if it’s not causing an issue.

White lithium grease is good for lubing the trunnions…sprays on easily and dries hard so it doesn’t attract saw dust. Paste wax applied with a tooth brush works too.

Looks to be in really nice shape…that saw is worth putting a decent blade on. Congrats!

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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StumpyNubs

6852 posts in 2261 days


#7 posted 10-23-2011 02:11 PM

I own this saw and like it very much. The solid cast iron wings are fantastic. That tenon jig is an expensive upgrade to (over $100). Did it come with the blade guard? That blade guard has a riving knife and two anti kickback catches (the things with the teeth) built in. (Some call it a splitter because it comes off with the blade guard). Keep the guard on as much as possible and it is an extremely safe saw. Also, if you have 220 power in your shop you can switch a couple wires in the motor to run it that way, which is REALLY nice!

-- Subscribe to "Stumpy Nubs Woodworking Journal"- One of the crafts' most unique publications: http://www.stumpynubs.com/

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BuyoMasilla

102 posts in 2008 days


#8 posted 10-23-2011 03:26 PM

Thanks for your replies gentlemen.

Knotscott, I have an 80 tooth diablo that did not go with the old (yet likely newer) firestorm my stepson just inherited. Depending on the task, it will go on for the finer cuts. Let me ask you yet another question, is the spay on white lithium available at the HD or Lowes that you know? or is another trip to woodcraft in my near future?

Seemed to me that the blade squared up pretty good at perpendicular from the table and the distance between miter slot and a tooth front and back on the blade.

StumpyNubs, the blade guard came with it. Can you tell me how hard it is to get on and off? I had a little sled on the firestorm that went with it. I guess I’ll have to build one for this saw. However, that reminds me….....I need to get back to the garage (where the “shop” is and tools reside) cabinets project before I start on jigs and such. Earlier in the week as I was working on the plywood, I measured once. Nough said as you know I’ll be cutting twice. As far as the 220 power, my step son thinks I should get professional help (not talking about my therapist now) and have service run to the garage where a new breaker box can go and get 220 and more 110 from there. Hopefully it’ll happen someday.

Back to the saw, and maybe you guys can give me some ideas. The pedal activated caster is not working properly. I have to keep my foot on it to have it engaged and working. I did not know better and then saw a rerun of Norm simply pushing the saw around while that pedal was locked in place.

Thanks again for reading. Mario

-- Dreaming of the day I might joint two pieces of wood square..........

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knotscott

7208 posts in 2836 days


#9 posted 10-23-2011 04:45 PM

HD and Lowes= both have spray on white lithium.

Take a pic of the front lift wheel…it might be installed incorrectly, or maybe someone will spot a possible adjustment.

If you don’t already have 220v, or easy access to it, it might not be worth the effort. Every motor and every circuit is different, so the interaction between them is different, causing results to vary in each case. (I noticed a pretty obvious improvement when I switched my 110v table saws to 220v…likely due to a very long 110v run). Try it on 110v first…hopefully your 110v circuit can be dedicated solely to the saw. If start ups seem slow, lights dim, and/or the saw bogs easily and recovers slowly, then 220v might be worth running. At the very least it’s a “nice to have” in just about any shop.

The 80T Diablo should be fine for ply and fine crossuts if it’s clean and sharp. If you’ve never cleaned it, get some household degreaser (409, Greased Lightning, Fantastic, etc) and spray it on…hit it with your wife’s toothbrush within a few minutes ;-), then rinse and dry. You didn’t ask, but if you’re looking for some really good deals on a new 42T ATB general purpose or 50T ATB/R combo , Onsrud still has some great clearance deals on Ebay…they’re German made industrial grade blades and have free s/h, and many sell for the listing price (auction style)...tough value to beat IMHO.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Howie's profile

Howie

2656 posts in 2384 days


#10 posted 10-23-2011 05:10 PM

I think you fell into a bargain. Enjoy!

-- Life is good.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4449 posts in 3421 days


#11 posted 10-23-2011 05:46 PM

Good score. READ THE MANUAL!!!!
My go-to blade is a full kerf Freud combo. I also have the Freud 80t crosscut and an Infinity 24t ripper.
Good blades will really make a difference.
Be sure to set the fence properly, and always use the splitter. Some remove the pawls (the toothed thingys), but I use all I can to prevent kickback. You’ve never been as excited as you’ll get when that happens.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View BuyoMasilla's profile

BuyoMasilla

102 posts in 2008 days


#12 posted 10-23-2011 07:20 PM

Howie, I’ll tell you that I’ve had worse spills for sure. Bill, I’ve installed the blade guard and hope to cut a bit of plywood later today, but could surely use an outfeed table.

Knotscott, I’m throwing in a couple pics of that wheel, as you mentioned, maybe you or someone else may spot the problem. I’m also trying to show the height measuring digital jig that got cropped out by photobucket, the blade guard, the in progress cabinets (they’re from the family handyman http://www.familyhandyman.com/DIY-Projects/Home-Organization/Garage-Storage/installing-large-garage-cabinets/Step-By-Step) and my current collection of 10 inch blades and their holder. Incidentally, it sounded that even the brand new blades should be brushed with best half’s tooth brush, correct?

Thanks, Mario

-- Dreaming of the day I might joint two pieces of wood square..........

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knotscott

7208 posts in 2836 days


#13 posted 10-23-2011 08:09 PM

I don’t see anything amiss on that wheel…maybe someone else will. Can the wheel location be adjusted within the frame? ...Or, if there any adjustable threaded feet on the legs, maybe those could be adjusted up a little so they don’t drag.

New blades should be fine…clean them often after use, and they’ll perform well for a long time. Using the wife’s toothbrush is optional, but I don’t like the taste of the spray cleaners so I use hers. :D

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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RibsBrisket4me

1526 posts in 1966 days


#14 posted 10-23-2011 08:10 PM

That is a sweet saw and sweet deal.

I have a Craftsman contractor saw that I’ve enjoyed for years. Lots of good and great bladed on the market. I found a link belt really made the saw run smoother.

I actually got a Forrest WW II THIRTY tooth blade and it is my daily blade. Rips great and surprisingly crosscuts to my liking as well. I’ve had it for 2+ yrs and just now I’m noticing it burn some cherry so it may be due for a sharpening. I picked the blade up on sale Amazon for $70.

Congrats and enjoy!

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BuyoMasilla

102 posts in 2008 days


#15 posted 10-25-2011 06:23 AM

Thanks Bullethead….....and the rest of you fellows for your comments and advice. The gentleman who owned the saw, rest in peace, was a big New Yankee Workshop fan. My co worker threw in all the extra gear he had for the saw, including a DVD on table saw starring Norm. Today another jig showed up which Norm used in this particular episode. It’s a pretty fancy miter jig with an abraded (sand paper?) fence about 3” tall and maybe 18” long with a stop for repeating cuts further sweetening the deal.

Bullethead, you mention your trusty blade and I must admit it’s not one I’m familiar with. I usually stay away from the pricy stuff. As you know, you can spend as much as you want on gear. I did take Knotscott’s suggestion and put a fifteen bucks bid on the 42 teeth Onsrud, and won!! It’ll get here via UPS in a few days I suppose. I have a cheap 8” dado from HF which I believe will perform better on the Delta than it did in the Firestorm.

I did rip a bit of plywood last night. I rigged an outfeed table with a couple of sawhorses. Kept if safe. It was niiiice.

-- Dreaming of the day I might joint two pieces of wood square..........

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