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Square sides on old Stanley Bailey planes?

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Forum topic by Brett posted 10-17-2011 08:00 PM 1311 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Brett

660 posts in 2143 days


10-17-2011 08:00 PM

I’m considering buying and refurbishing an old Stanley Bailey plane to use as a dedicated shooting plane (my other user-planes have irons with slight cambers, and I’d like my shooting plane to have a straight iron).

Are the sides of any of the old No. 5, No. 5 1/2, or No. 6 planes machined square to the base? I know that I could cant the plane iron so the cutting edge is square to the base, but I’d prefer to use a plane with a side that is square as well. Any thoughts?

-- More tools, fewer machines.


6 replies so far

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TheDane

4997 posts in 3123 days


#1 posted 10-17-2011 08:08 PM

Brett—Generally, when they left the factory they were square. But they can, over time and with use/abuse, wind up out of square.

I had a local machine shop (that kind rebuilds auto engines) square up the #5 I use on my shooting board. They also flattened the sole and and produced a near mirror-polish on it … I think they charged me $20 to do it.

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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Brett

660 posts in 2143 days


#2 posted 10-17-2011 08:20 PM

Twenty bucks? That’s worth looking into. Thanks.

-- More tools, fewer machines.

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TheDane

4997 posts in 3123 days


#3 posted 10-17-2011 08:25 PM

It only took a few minutes to do, and he only took off a few thousandths. The only problem with that plane now is it is too pretty to use!

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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Dan

3630 posts in 2341 days


#4 posted 10-17-2011 08:25 PM

You can lap/flatten the sides of the plane just like you would the sole using some sandpaper that is attached to a flat surface. I have done this a number of times and found that the sides take far less time to flatten then the soles do.

The sides would have to be way off to really make a noticeable effect when using with a shooting board.

I would also suggest the 5 1/2 or 6 for a shooting plane. The #5 will work but the extra mass and blade width of the 5 1/2 and 6 make them a little better for shooting IMO… Those are the two sizes I use most for shooting.

-- Dan - "Collector of Hand Planes"

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Brit

6711 posts in 2303 days


#5 posted 10-17-2011 08:36 PM

Ditto what Dan said. I’ve found that most old Baileys are out of square, but it is only worth doing for a plane that will be used for shooting.

-- Andy -- "I saw the angel in the marble and carved until I set him free." (Michelangelo)

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Brett

660 posts in 2143 days


#6 posted 10-17-2011 08:59 PM

Some of my Stanley Bailey planes were both out-of-square and “out of flat”. In other words, not only were the sides not at 90 degrees t the sole, but the top part of the “hump” on the sides also curved inwards more than the base. I tried to lap the sides as I did the base, but because the tops curve inwards, it would have required removing too much metal to truly make the sides either square or flat.

-- More tools, fewer machines.

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