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Forum topic by Howie posted 1041 days ago 1101 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Howie

2656 posts in 1550 days


1041 days ago

Has anyone converted theirs to 220 and was it worth it?

-- Life is good.


13 replies so far

View Steven H's profile

Steven H

1113 posts in 1687 days


#1 posted 1041 days ago

First of all do you have 220?

View GMman's profile

GMman

3902 posts in 2325 days


#2 posted 1041 days ago

COPY/PASTE…...from the web.

I have a Grizzly G0514X bandsaw and have had excellent luck with it. I really shopped around (Jet, Delta, Rikon, Powermatic) and found that it had the best features.

Some of Grizzly’s tools are junk. This saw is solid and has functioned reliably. I cut corbels, arches, and brackets from heavy timber. I re-wired my saw to run on 220V, and it sails through the thickest timbers I can throw at it. It is easy to tune and runs quietly. The saw is awesome for resaw work as well.

The only problem I had was with the motor starter. I was starting and stopping the saw well over 60 times an hour, and it was eating starters. I figured out that it is just best to leave it running so the starter isn’t overworked, and now I limit myself to probably 20-30 starts per hour. Grizzly took great care of me with replacement parts in a hurry. They are great to deal with.

View Howie's profile

Howie

2656 posts in 1550 days


#3 posted 1041 days ago

@steve: Yes I have 220 right next to the saw. All I need to do is swap the wiring and plug.
Gman: I don’t use mine as much as you do. It’s been awesome though. Just thought I might swap it to 220 if it was worth it.

-- Life is good.

View syenefarmer's profile

syenefarmer

389 posts in 1708 days


#4 posted 1041 days ago

The only real advantage to having it wired 220V over 110V is that the bandsaw will more than likely be on a dedicated service with 220V and share the line with other things on 110V. If more power and cheaper to run are what you’re looking for, 220V will give you neither.

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Howie

2656 posts in 1550 days


#5 posted 1041 days ago

Thanks for all the replys. Frankly it doesn’t seem worth it.

-- Life is good.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14721 posts in 2303 days


#6 posted 1041 days ago

Unless you have a noticeable hesitation when you start the motor, you will not gain a thing.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Paul Stoops's profile

Paul Stoops

322 posts in 1188 days


#7 posted 1040 days ago

I have this same saw and wired my shop with a 220VAC outlet specifically for the bandsaw. However, I haven’t gotten around to making the changeover yet, altho I do plan to do so in the near future. One factor that hasn’t been mentioned is that operating tools on 220VAC does a better job of balancing the current draw between both sides of the line. As a side note, when I changed my 1 1/2HP tablesaw motor from 110VAC to 220VAC, I noticed that the saw motor came up to speed almost instantly.

This tool has a 1 1/2HP motor rated at 15A 120VAC, which is 75% of a 20A circuit capacity rating. I personally don't like to operate 110VAC circuits any higher than that. This motor would only pull 7.5A 220VAC, which would be distributed equally across both legs of the circuit. Also, as mentioned before, there may be other tools or lighting on the same 110VAC circuit, using some of the available capacity of that circuit.

I also agree that there is no power cost advantage to using 220VAC, since power is charged on the basis of kwh consumption.

If I had the choice, I would opt to use the 220VAC circuit.

-- Paul, Auburn, WA

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14721 posts in 2303 days


#8 posted 1040 days ago

That is an example of a noticeable hesitation. The problem is starting too big a motor on a circuit with too much voltage drop caused by the starting in rush current.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Jimbo4's profile

Jimbo4

1131 posts in 1390 days


#9 posted 1039 days ago

When I had my house built, I had a dedicated 220v/20Amp dedicated service line just for this purpose. I have
converted my TS, BS, and lathe all to 220V – piece of cake. They all start easier, run cooler, and use less amps
than a 110. I have only one outlet, so when I want to use a tool, I just unplug and replug – no big deal ! I also
like the idea that I can switch off the dedicated circuit breaker to keep “little” prying hands out of the workings.

-- BELT SANDER: Used for making rectangular gouges in wood.

View rance's profile

rance

4129 posts in 1788 days


#10 posted 1039 days ago

Jim, it will certainly use less amps with 220v, about half. But Watts is the apples to apples comparison in this case, not amps. :)

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View Elizabeth's profile

Elizabeth

796 posts in 1771 days


#11 posted 1039 days ago

I converted mine, partly because I wanted to see if I could do it and mostly because by using the 200v plug in the ceiling I could avoid running a 110v extension cord across my shop. I wrote up a blog post about how to do it here:

http://lumberjocks.com/Elizabeth/blog/24647

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3404 posts in 2587 days


#12 posted 1039 days ago

I have a dedicated 240 v for the TS and the compressor. Other than a bit quicker on the start-up, I find no difference.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14721 posts in 2303 days


#13 posted 1039 days ago

What size are the motors Bill? I will bet, 1 hp or larger ;-)

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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