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What to do with maple tree cut down in front yard

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Forum topic by grace123 posted 10-15-2011 05:54 PM 2665 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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grace123

159 posts in 1419 days


10-15-2011 05:54 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

My brother lives in a house with two 85-year-old maple trees in the front yard. The insurance company will no longer provide insurance for the house because some of the tree limbs hang over the top of the house unless the trees are cut back or removed. One tree cut has been cut down. The second tree will be radically cut back. The result will be pleasing in a summer or two.

My question is this: This is a silver maple tree. There are large pieces of trunk lying in the yard. How can I use this wood? I do not have a lathe and do not know how to turn wood anyway. Should I cut the wood with a bandsaw into boards and let them dry? How long to dry? or is this just nice firewood?


10 replies so far

View Andy123's profile

Andy123

226 posts in 1130 days


#1 posted 10-15-2011 09:29 PM

Photos or it didn’t happen!

-- The mistakes I make in woodworking are not mistakes they just give my projects character- Me

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1771 days


#2 posted 10-15-2011 09:54 PM

Grace :-)
make lumber .. deffently not firewood
as fast as possiple after you crosscut you seal the ends with wax/paint/latex.. your choise
then you can do it on a bandsaw but depending on the size of both the Bs and the trunks
it cuold be better to let someone do it for you

asap after the cutting tolumber you stack and stick between each layer
be sure you have the stickers right over each other and 30 -50 cm between them

if you let it dry outside I hear it takes 1½ year for the first inch and you should add a year for
every inch you add in thichness …. if you don´t have access to a kiln

when its time to use it (dry enoff) then get it in the shop 1-2 month before to let it settle
and fits the invirement of your shop

Dennis

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1296 days


#3 posted 10-15-2011 09:57 PM

If I had them, they would be re-sawn on the bandsaw, then stickered to dry. Drying time varies due to how wet they are now, how well air gets to the stickered stacks, the temp and average humidity of the air at the storage site, etc. Invest in a moisture meter.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View grace123's profile

grace123

159 posts in 1419 days


#4 posted 10-16-2011 02:58 AM

This is in response to Andy123. Here are pictures from the tree trimming going on at my brother’s yard.

View grace123's profile

grace123

159 posts in 1419 days


#5 posted 10-16-2011 02:59 AM

My brother is quite upset about the trimming on this maple tree. My other brother suggested that we make something in the woodshop from some of the wood as a sentimental keepsake. Ideas?

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1296 days


#6 posted 10-16-2011 03:08 AM

oh, yeah… I’d love to have the stack in picture #2. Sweet.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1771 days


#7 posted 10-16-2011 02:38 PM

of course that wood have to be used in the shop :-)
but get those ends sealed yesterday
I second David :-)

View patron's profile

patron

13034 posts in 1997 days


#8 posted 10-16-2011 02:50 PM

when you seal them
keep them from the sun
(but they need air also)
it will make them dry too fast
and they could split to much

here is anchorseal
you put it on the ends
to keep them from drying to fast
(for that pile you will need a 5 gallon pail)

http://www.woodcraft.com/product/2080619/29484/anchorseal-2-green-wood-sealer-gallon.aspx?refcode=10ingopb&gclid=CO

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View Nomad62's profile

Nomad62

710 posts in 1614 days


#9 posted 10-17-2011 06:36 PM

I just got done working with some silver leaf maple, it was soft and machined/sanded very well. The wood oxidized to a fine yellow as it sat in my house drying (not the whole tree, lol), but after machining was a very light gold, quite beautiful. The only problem was that it warped as it dried, and I had to work to get a board from it. The pics of the tree show mostly limbs that have an angle to them, something that generally loads the wood with tension that unloads as it dries; if you do slice it up, slice it thick and let it do its thing as it dries, leaving you something to work with. Beautiful tree… if there’s any rot in it, cut it all down or it will just rot faster after trimming.

-- Power tools put us ahead of the monkeys

View Bill Burr's profile

Bill Burr

12 posts in 1089 days


#10 posted 10-18-2011 08:38 PM

A word of caution on the maple tree/lumber. The saw-able logs appear to be limb logs not main trunk logs. The lumber from limb logs will have a tendenciy to warp. The wood is under stress and when sawn it sometimes goes around corners. Your logs are growing some-what straight and may not be a problem But be prepared just in case it happens. Also there appears to be several crotches that may be usable. I think it all worth a try and good luck and be safe!!!!

-- Just another beautiful day in paradise.

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