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Gas Powered Saw?

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Forum topic by crank49 posted 1049 days ago 3480 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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crank49

3373 posts in 1602 days


1049 days ago

I was just reading a discussion about changing the motor on a table saw and it dawned on me that I have never seen or heard of a gas powered table saw, or circular saw either, for that matter.

Seems like a pretty simple substitute on a contractor type saw.

I’ve seen drills with little two stroke gas engines, but a more useful tool would be a chainsaw type motor on a circular saw. Battery powered drills are pretty much perfected but I don’t think the battery saws are there yet. I know they exist, but I hear comments like they run out of juice after a few cuts, or they just don’t have the power to cut anything bigger than trim.

I’m obviously not talking about an application for a furniture maker or a fine woodworking shop, but like working at a river house or cabin where there may not be standard power. Or, maybe for a remodeler for use outside where extension cords are a pain.

I think I’d love to have a worm drive saw with a 22cc gas engine.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H


20 replies so far

View sandhill's profile

sandhill

2118 posts in 2555 days


#1 posted 1049 days ago

I think I would use a generator I don’t see an plication where a gas powered saw would be of any benefit other than at a mill. Just my 2cents.

-- Bob Egbert AKA Sandhill http://www.sandhillwoodworks.com/

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ajosephg

1850 posts in 2192 days


#2 posted 1049 days ago

Too much starting and stopping

-- Joe

View mikema's profile

mikema

175 posts in 1217 days


#3 posted 1049 days ago

unbelievably http://dayton.craigslist.org/tls/2590782419.html

Seems incredibly unsafe to have a gas powered motor directly connected to a TS.

-- Mike ---- Visit my woodworking blog: http://sawdustnewbie.com

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PutnamEco

155 posts in 1917 days


#4 posted 1049 days ago

There were a few manufacturers that produced gas circular saws, The Homelite had their XL-100 which was probably the most common, I believe it was based on a chainsaw engine. Piston Powered Products produced their Super Saw, which IMHO is the best design of the bunch being very similar to a string trimmers engine that kept the weight down a reasonable amount. One of the earliest commonly produced would be the Comet by Tote-n Tool, that was part of a series of tools based on the O&R (Ohlsson and Rice) engine platform.

Homelite XL-100 vid
http://youtu.be/a7MMKloZc4U

a 1919 Oshkosh Eveready table saw
http://youtu.be/38_-Dcr6w68

Re: sandhill says:
I think I would use a generator I don’t see an plication where a gas powered saw would be of any benefit other than at a mill.

So which would you rather carry a three horsepower motored saw or a generator capable of powering a three horsepower motor and a three horsepower electric saw? Now think about building a house in the wilderness, where yours access is either by horse or ATV.

-- “The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.” ― Franklin D. Roosevelt

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

1490 posts in 352 days


#5 posted 29 days ago

Dragging up an old thread, I know, but this is too cool: http://www.farmshow.com/a_article.php?aid=26032 A Stihl chainsaw engine should provide ample power even if not using a worm drive gear train. Surprisingly light too.

View pauljuilleret's profile

pauljuilleret

25 posts in 284 days


#6 posted 29 days ago

If you are close to any Amish they use them all the time I just had some roof work done by a Amish contractor in the Wooster Ohio area that is what this crew used As I understand it they can use electric tools as long as they don’t own them These guys though were the strict type (Old order Amish I think they are called) I offered the use of mine and was told they would use theirs instead a few stores in the area do sell them as I understand but you won’t get them at the big box stores

View CessnaPilotBarry's profile

CessnaPilotBarry

886 posts in 741 days


#7 posted 29 days ago

Fire trucks often carry gas powered cutoff saws that use circular blades, but they’re a different form factor than a construction circular saw.

Personally, I’m also in the camp that would probably choose a generator and electric tools. The generator will run several tools sequentially, without starting and stopping an engine, as well as power anything else electric. You also only have to worry about things like fresh fuel and maintenance on one engine vs. many.

30A generators capable of powering 220v tools are common, easily transported, and not expensive when compared to many small engines. You’ll see them everywhere on R/V’s, as well utility trucks in states with vehicle anti-idling laws.

If you want small, I have a 2000 watt Honda inverter generator that is less than 50 pounds, super efficient, extremely quiet, and will easily power any 120v power tool. I’ve used it to run anything from airplane pre-heaters, to my electric chainsaw, to routers, as well as to cover my critical needs during power failures at home. Yamaha makes a similar unit. The only problem is that small, light, well-made 2000 watt / 120v units cost more to purchase than a garden variety 10,000 watt 220v unit.

-- It's all good, if it's wood...

View lndfilwiz's profile

lndfilwiz

28 posts in 232 days


#8 posted 29 days ago

Paul beat me to it about Old Order Amish. We have a large community of Amish in WNY with most of them being Old Order. They use Gasoline and diesel powered motors to run their shops. Many have overhead pulley systems to run their power tools that they modify. I have seen one Amish man convert a circular saw to run with a chain saw motor. However, this is frowned upon in this community. Most are not allowed to even own chain saws. The use of overhead pulley systems have been used for hundreds of years and this has not diminished the quality of work the Amish do.

-- Smile, it makes people wander what you are up to.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

1490 posts in 352 days


#9 posted 19 days ago

I was thinking about this concept (maybe a little too much) and I was looking in my shed and remembered my edger really isn’t that far off from being a gas circular saw, so I thought why not:

I did have to fabricate a bushing to keep the blade concentric with the arbor as it’s only 0.55” where as the blade is 0.625” but after that, it worked surprisingly well. The speed of the edger is close enough to that of a circular saw that performance was good, cutting a little over 1.5” deep in soft maple was done as quickly as I would be able to with an electric circular saw. Despite holding the blade concentric, the shoulder on the arbor was too small and allowed enough blade wobble to cut a kerf about twice that of the blade, but still did so efficiently.

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1245 posts in 703 days


#10 posted 19 days ago



I was thinking about this concept (maybe a little too much) and I was looking in my shed and remembered my edger really isn t that far off from being a gas circular saw, so I thought why not:

I did have to fabricate a bushing to keep the blade concentric with the arbor as it s only 0.55” where as the blade is 0.625” but after that, it worked surprisingly well. The speed of the edger is close enough to that of a circular saw that performance was good, cutting a little over 1.5” deep in soft maple was done as quickly as I would be able to with an electric circular saw. Despite holding the blade concentric, the shoulder on the arbor was too small and allowed enough blade wobble to cut a kerf about twice that of the blade, but still did so efficiently.

- bigblockyeti


That thing would be great for removing a glue down, or other floor!!! Or straigtlinning sheets on the floor, against a guide!! or just random havoc.

-- Who is John Galt?

View JayT's profile

JayT

2182 posts in 842 days


#11 posted 19 days ago

In regards to Amish modding tools to be gas instead of electric.

Source:
http://www.toolsofthetrade.net/homemade-and-modified-tools/hacking-a-ridgid-miter-saw.aspx

-- "The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money." Alexis de Tocqueville, 1835

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

715 posts in 117 days


#12 posted 19 days ago

Damn that electricity stuff.

-- "We build our workshops. Then we enjoy the fruits of our labor by laboring for more fruits." - Me

View nicksmurf111's profile

nicksmurf111

126 posts in 82 days


#13 posted 19 days ago

Lawnmower engines are governed, so as long as you have enough flywheel weight they should work great on a table saw. You can even rig up a cutout switch where you would normally expect your on-off switch to be. I like rigging up stuff and would consider using a 3-5hp horizontal engine on a planer or molder.

-- Nicholas

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

2794 posts in 1874 days


#14 posted 18 days ago

A saw or any machine can be run off a belt driven jackshaft. That jackshaft can be run from any power source. This type of drive was in general use 100 years ago. The power source in this case could be steam engine, gasoline engine, water power or even horse power and off course electric motor. The saw doesn’t care who or what is powering it. There are even water powered saws for underwater use. I wouldn’t want a gas engine running in the same shop as I’m in. A better way is to run an electric saw from a portable generator. It’s just not practical.

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1245 posts in 703 days


#15 posted 18 days ago


I wouldn t want a gas engine running in the same shop as I m in. A better way is to run an electric saw from a portable generator.

- MrRon


In fact a worker in texas Died of Carbon Monoxide poisoning this week running a gas powered concrete saw indoors, w/o proper ventilation.

-- Who is John Galt?

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