LumberJocks

Tracking problem with Jet 12" bandsaw

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by topcat posted 10-12-2011 04:50 PM 2633 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View topcat's profile

topcat

43 posts in 1896 days


10-12-2011 04:50 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question bandsaw

Hi all, I have a 7 year old Jet bandsaw. I can track the blade pretty well on the upper wheel, but the lower wheel seems to want to keep the blade well toward the front. In fact, the teeth on the 1/2” blades ride off of the tire. The tires are good, so is there any way to to fix the problem? I’ve had the 1/2” blade dig into the front of the tire so much, it has pushed the tire out of the groove and towards the back of the wheel. Not good for the blades.

-- Tom - As you get older, you learn to hide your mistakes better


6 replies so far

View rowdy's profile

rowdy

375 posts in 2909 days


#1 posted 10-12-2011 05:10 PM

I am having the same problem with mine. Hope someone offers some good advice.

-- Rowdy in Kechi, Kansas

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

9451 posts in 3519 days


#2 posted 10-12-2011 09:32 PM

Are the wheels Coplanar?

Take a straight edge and place it over BOTH wheels…
... if you see NO light wherever it touches the wheels, you’re OK…
... if not, you see gaps… your wheels need to be adjusted so they line-up (are coplanar).

Do you have TOO much tension on the blade?

Your tires may look OK, but they are NOT…
I replaced my G0555 tires with Urethane tires and it solved ALL of the problems I was having (not as bad as yours though)... Best $$ I ever spent on the band saw!

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View topcat's profile

topcat

43 posts in 1896 days


#3 posted 10-13-2011 08:23 PM

I think I got it! I had to shim the lower wheel by taking the wheel off and putting a round shim between the wheel and the fly wheel behind it. This shifted the whole thing forward. The I had to shim the bearing assembly to bring that wheel coplanar with the upper wheel. Then, I discovered what this little red mark is on the riser block;

From Band Saw Tune Up
Turns out, there’s another one on the other side, here;
From Band Saw Tune Up

Turns out the little set screws found at these locations adjust the upper wheel on a horizontal axis. Once I evened the upper wheel and shimmed the lower wheel, the blade seems to stay on track.
Joe, I will buy the tires ASAP> I’ve read up on these and they truly improve the performance of the wheels. Cool guide block are also on the horizon.

Upon reflection, this solution seems to be working for now, but it seems excessive. I’m sure I will be revisiting this issue . . . maybe when I get the new accessories.

-- Tom - As you get older, you learn to hide your mistakes better

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

9451 posts in 3519 days


#4 posted 10-13-2011 08:35 PM

Tom,

Sure glad you found EVERYTHING that caused it!
That was quite a few things that went wrong…

Sure is nice when a plan comes together…

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View topcat's profile

topcat

43 posts in 1896 days


#5 posted 10-14-2011 01:31 PM

Sure was a lot of twisting an turning of stuff. Again, it just seems like it’s too much. Well see what happens when I start running some better tires . . . although I can’t see those effecting the way the wheels spin. The saw did sit under tension through freezing a heating seasons. It could be that something just warped or twisted. Oh, well. It works.

-- Tom - As you get older, you learn to hide your mistakes better

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

3187 posts in 2244 days


#6 posted 10-14-2011 02:23 PM

This is one of those things about commercial rated equipment. They must be maintained in a way that is not like the “throw away” homeowner stuff. The manufacturers plan for these adjustments and they are there to use. I have had to adjust and re-adjust most of my equipment on a regular basis to keep them tuned the way I want them to operate – it is now routine.

This is to be expected and budgeted for, if not, the equipment gets unreliable and dangerous. I keep spare bearings, blades, tires, shims, manuals and notes for adjusting and troubleshooting, etc… for my equipment. Learning how to setup and adjust the equipment is a valuable part of the learning curve in using the equipment.

-- David in Damascus, MD

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com