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Forum topic by Les posted 10-05-2011 02:38 PM 1810 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Les

201 posts in 2158 days


10-05-2011 02:38 PM

Good morning,

I am planning on replacing and adding new kitchen cabinets. They are currently oak and I am changing to cherry. I seem to recall reading about a process using contact cement on only one side of the surfaces that worked well, but I have the CRS disease. Does anyone recall seeing this??

Has anyone done this and have any problems to avoid? I will be making new doors and drawer fronts.

-- Stay busy....Stay young


13 replies so far

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

15677 posts in 2474 days


#1 posted 10-05-2011 02:41 PM

Is the plan to laminate cherry ply over the exisiting oak ones and then change out the fronts? I believe contat cement rolled out in a thin layer is the way to go if that is the case.

We just had a cabinet guy come in to price out refinishing our old knotty pine 1960’s cabs and it was expensive ….. good luck!

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk

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Les

201 posts in 2158 days


#2 posted 10-05-2011 04:31 PM

I will use veneer and replace the fronts, you are right.

-- Stay busy....Stay young

View dpop24's profile

dpop24

115 posts in 2037 days


#3 posted 10-06-2011 10:42 PM

I was just about to start a new thread about refacing since I’m getting to ready to start ours too, so your thread is timely. Not trying to get your thread off course, I just figured my questions were related enough that there would be no benefit of starting a new thread.

This is the process I am planning to follow. 1/8” ply for the side panels and veneer for the face fronts. Then obviously new doors and drawer fronts. It’s going to be my first attempt at refacing, but it shouldn’t be too difficult. One of the things I haven’t figured out is if I need to place any trim pieces where the 1/8” ply might show, or if I just lap the veneer over the exposed ply edge.

-- If it ain't broke, take it apart and find out why

View Les 's profile

Les

201 posts in 2158 days


#4 posted 10-06-2011 11:46 PM

No problem here, anything I can find out is great. I was in Rockler today and looked at their veneer. It was really high I thought. I understand Menards has the same stuff a lot cheaper. I will check it out and let everyone know.

When I do mine I will take them down and move them to the shop to work on them.

Les

-- Stay busy....Stay young

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,

2387 posts in 3014 days


#5 posted 10-07-2011 12:31 AM

We build kitchens for a living and always advise against refinishing. The labor is intensive and most of the work must be done on site which is not as efficient.

If you are replacing all doors and drawer faces and skinning your face frames that is 90% of the job. Building cabinet boxes is easy and not all that costly at all.

Building new face frames with kreg pocket hole jig is simple and does not cost much to do. Just guessing, but you may only need 100 bf or less of cherry, should cost less then 200 from hardwoods dealer if you go with rustic/#2 common. Rustic cherry is fairly clear with minimal knots that you can cut around.

Then kreg jig and face frame clamp and gallon of tight bond for 200.

Using your existing layout, plan and design your face frame layouts. In two days all face frames can be built easily.

Just guessing, but say you get 15 sheets of good furniture grade ply 50 per sheet comes to 750. Build your cabinet boxes to match your face frames.

Attach face frames with wood glue and pocket screws.

Use shelf hole jig to drill all peg holes for shelves. Many options, from using cheap peg board as template or buying inexpensive jig/mating bit like one from Rockler for 35.00.

Building new drawers, very simple. 1-2 sheets 1/2” baltic birch. Depending on your level of exp, butt joint with staples, dado or rabbit joint with glue and staple, or dovetail with glue. Be sure to install drawer bottom inside 1/4” groove cut 1/2” up from bottom of side parts. The baltic should cost somewhere around 50.00 for both sheets. You might only need one sheet.

Ball bearing glides can be had for around 5-8.00 per pair. Figure drawer width to be 1 1/16 less than opening. Or a nicer under mount glide with soft.close for around 15.00 per pair. For undermount drawer width, subtract 3/4” from opening.

So for between 1000-1,500.00, you could have high quality cabinets ready for new cabinet doors. New doors might cost around 12-15.00 sf. For doors we use blum straight arm hinge with 0 mm face frame plate. I figure door sizes at opening plus 1” for one door cabinet. Opening plus 1” divide two for two door cabinet.

Slab drawer faces are very simple and very affordable to make.

From there you can get as fancy as you like, such as adding moldings, fluting, fancy corbels, extra door panels for visible ends.

I probably gave more info than you wanted but maybe the info will be helpfull to someone.

-- .

View Mark Brown's profile

Mark Brown

10 posts in 2161 days


#6 posted 10-07-2011 12:50 AM

We remodeled our Kitchen last year. Our cabinets were builder grade cabinets with solid oak fronts, but the sides were made of pressboard with a simulated wood\paper veneer. The front of the cabinets looked ok, but the sides looked pretty cheap. I considered applying 1/8” panels to the sides, but wasn’t sure how to hide the ply edging.

So I decided to build raised panel sides instead. I was fortunate that the stained matched pretty good. We also added molding to the top and bottom of the upper cabinets and replaced the base moldings on the lower cabinets. I think the moldings gave it a more custom\finished look and helped integrate the new side panels.

-- Mark, Pearland Tx

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Les

201 posts in 2158 days


#7 posted 10-07-2011 12:51 AM

Jerry, thanks for the info, food for thought as always and you are right, for just a little bit more you can build the whole thing. I wasn’t doing anything this winter anyway. LOL I have plans for new cabinets as well so why not built them all? I will look into it. I love how you cut to the chase. thanks for the info.

Les

-- Stay busy....Stay young

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

15677 posts in 2474 days


#8 posted 10-07-2011 12:52 AM

Wow thanks for the info Jerry .. cetainly food for thought on my end and im sure dpop and wes will thank you for the insight.

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk

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Les

201 posts in 2158 days


#9 posted 10-07-2011 12:53 AM

Looks great Mark!!! You never go wrong up grading to quality.

Les

-- Stay busy....Stay young

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chrisstef

15677 posts in 2474 days


#10 posted 10-07-2011 12:55 AM

“ahhh Les get outta my head” lol

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk

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Les

201 posts in 2158 days


#11 posted 10-07-2011 01:28 AM

But there is sooooo much to learn there!!!

-- Stay busy....Stay young

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,

2387 posts in 3014 days


#12 posted 10-07-2011 02:38 AM

Mark, that is a nice job you dis to dress up the cabinets.

To add just a bit to what i first posted. For the average hobby woodworker, building their own kitchen while buying doors is achievable. A lot of woodworkers can build their own doors.

For the first go around, i would strongly suggest you buy a cabinet maker book, amazon has some good books. A good review of a “how to” book will inform you of minor key details to consider.

And as for prices I stated, realize they fluctuate nationwide, but be sure to buy lumber from where ever local cabinet shops are buying from, doing this will ensure you are getting the most competative lumber pricing. Buy functional hardware online unless you find a competative local source.

The prices I stated are actually higher then what we pay. We pay 1.60 bf for #2 common cherry and about 38.00 per 3/4” birch sheet with UV coating 2 sided.

-- .

View D_Allen's profile

D_Allen

495 posts in 2251 days


#13 posted 10-08-2011 03:14 AM

With my brother’s help I refinished my kitchen in Hickory. It looks great…but…I’d not do it again.
As was stated the labor and cost would have been comparable to building new.
In my case I used veneer for the ends and 1/4” thick pieces over the face frames. Using ‘L’ shaped pieces at the corners that covered the edges of the veneer makes it look from the outside like that are new cabinets.
But I also sanded and painted all of the insides. The drawer fronts and doors were all remade as raised panels so technically, about half the wood in each cabinet is new.
The drawbacks are that the drawers could not accept modern slides and it is very noticeable when you open a door that the cabinet is refaced. I guess I figured I had more time than money when I did it.
BTW, I used 3M water based contact adhesive and to tell the truth, after 3 years I expected it to start coming off…but it has not. There are no nails on the face frame pieces, just contact adhesive. I also used that on the veneer and I have yet to find any place where it has come loose or wrinkled.

-- Website is finally up and running....www.woodandwrite.com

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