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Problem with cutting board joints

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Forum topic by harrywho posted 10-04-2011 09:24 PM 1717 views 1 time favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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harrywho

115 posts in 1980 days


10-04-2011 09:24 PM

Topic tags/keywords: joints swelling glue

On both my end grain and straight grain cutting boards I keep getting what I presume is joint swelling where I can feel the glue joints after a couple of weeks. I sand through 80, 120, 180, 220 and 320 grit and when I finish they feel like glass. I oil them with mineral oil and then a mineral oil and beeswax mixture.
Any suggestions on how I can keep them feeling like glass?

-- Harry, Indiana


15 replies so far

View David's profile

David

196 posts in 1411 days


#1 posted 10-04-2011 09:57 PM

What type of glue are you using? I’ve used Titebond III and had no similar issues.

-- Perilous to all of us are the devices of an art deeper than we ourselves possess. --Gandalf the Grey http://davidwahl.org/category/woodworking/

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harrywho

115 posts in 1980 days


#2 posted 10-04-2011 10:41 PM

David,
I’m using Titebond II. Do you think there’s that much difference?

-- Harry, Indiana

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PurpLev

8476 posts in 2396 days


#3 posted 10-04-2011 10:46 PM

what wood are you using? are those different types of wood? have they acclimated to your shop? did you mill them just prior to glueup? did you mill them only on one side (or more so on one side than the other)? is this happening on ALL your boards or just some? how many? are you using biscuits/splines to align the joints or is it simple butt joints?

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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David

196 posts in 1411 days


#4 posted 10-04-2011 10:48 PM

I don’t know for sure how much difference there is, I’ve always used Titebond III simply due to the longer open clamp time which helps for cutting boards. It meets a more stringent waterproofing spec than TB II, whatever that really means.

-- Perilous to all of us are the devices of an art deeper than we ourselves possess. --Gandalf the Grey http://davidwahl.org/category/woodworking/

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harrywho

115 posts in 1980 days


#5 posted 10-04-2011 11:04 PM

The most recent ones are all European cherry endgrain. I bought a small pallet of what I think was supposed to be used for flooring. They are all 17 1/2” x 2 1/2” x 7/8”. I run them through a drum sander on the face sides and them face glue them to get a block approx. 17 1/2” x 12” x 2 1/2”. Run them through the planer and than the drum sander, than cut 1 5/8” slices off the block, turn them 90 degrees and glue with Titebond II. Run them through the drum sander again to flatten and start sanding with a ROS. After sanding I apply several heavy coats of Mineral oil and lastly a couple of coats of mineral oil with beeswax. They have been in my shop for several months although it’s unheated and the temp. varies with the outside temp.
After a couple of weeks its like you can feel the individual peices of wood. Kind of like they absorbed moisture and swelled different amounts.

-- Harry, Indiana

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David

196 posts in 1411 days


#6 posted 10-04-2011 11:17 PM

Your process is the same as mine with the only notable exceptions being I only use mineral oil, Titebond III, and a belt sander. Since I doubt the beeswax (or sanding method) is the issue, I would suggest giving Titebond III a try.

-- Perilous to all of us are the devices of an art deeper than we ourselves possess. --Gandalf the Grey http://davidwahl.org/category/woodworking/

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dub560

606 posts in 1661 days


#7 posted 10-04-2011 11:52 PM

I get the same issue using titebond 2 but when using titebond 3 I rearly encounter it. I might have to switch b’cuz it’s too much sanding for me.

-- Life is enjoyable especially when you borrow from people

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harrywho

115 posts in 1980 days


#8 posted 10-05-2011 12:35 AM

Well I guess I will give Titebond III a try.
Thanks for the input guys.

-- Harry, Indiana

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David

196 posts in 1411 days


#9 posted 10-06-2011 04:38 PM

@cr1 Good point, I never even thought of that. How long would you recommend waiting? I usually leave anything glued clamped overnight and I don’t sand for at least 24 hours.

-- Perilous to all of us are the devices of an art deeper than we ourselves possess. --Gandalf the Grey http://davidwahl.org/category/woodworking/

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harrywho

115 posts in 1980 days


#10 posted 10-06-2011 08:48 PM

cr1 Makes perfect sense! I live in Indiana, should have similiar weather as you, how long would you wait under normal conditions, say 65-70 degrees?
Got to love this site and the helpful people on it!!!

-- Harry, Indiana

View Luke's profile

Luke

541 posts in 2042 days


#11 posted 10-09-2011 05:16 AM

I’ve got a different approach all together. Finish it with a good wipe on poly instead of oil. I used to use oil as well and had the same problems. Plus the finish doesn’t look as good as with a good poly. It dries much quicker and once it is dry all the harmful stuff is gone as well. And if you really want to get technical there are also lots of stories of Mineral oil causing problems but you gotta live your life so I say use what looks good and a good poly will look like glass for a while then you can sand it down and re-coat. Try re-coating an oil surface to make it look good, especially on a cutting board that’s had who knows what in the pores of the wood. The sandpaper just gums up and you end up doing a ton of work to get to the same point. After 24 hours of glue drying the water is gone. unless you live in a tropical forest.

-- LAS, http://www.abettersign.com

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dub560

606 posts in 1661 days


#12 posted 10-12-2011 11:13 AM

I’ve left some of my boards for over a week before sanding and I still get this issue. I understand what was said about moisture and curing time but with this glue, no matter how long you leave your boards before sanding, it seems to always yield the same results. I don’t know, I might try waxing as apposed to oiling just to see if the same happens.

-- Life is enjoyable especially when you borrow from people

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tenontim

2131 posts in 2492 days


#13 posted 10-12-2011 02:09 PM

I normally use Titebond III, but ran out and the only thing available in our small town is Gorilla glue’s white glue, which is comparable to Titebond II. I had the same joint swelling. I agree with Cr1, to give the glue plenty of time to dry, but the III has never given me any problems.

View generic's profile

generic

84 posts in 346 days


#14 posted 05-23-2014 04:25 PM

I have read through this post and was wondering if you ever found a solution to your problem. I justy made my first end grain board and after a few days, I have noticed the same issue. I can feel where the glue is sticking up ever so slightly. It’s kind of annoying and I am contemplating sanding and resealing.

I used walnut and cherry with Titebond III glue. I let it sit a couple days before applying 2 coats of mineral oil followed by 2 coats of butcher block oil.

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David

196 posts in 1411 days


#15 posted 05-23-2014 04:29 PM

Not a solution, but a board that I made ~3 years ago out of cherry and TB3 finished with mineral oil has seen almost daily use with no further oiling and no joint swelling. I would try sanding again and wait a few more days to see what happens.

-- Perilous to all of us are the devices of an art deeper than we ourselves possess. --Gandalf the Grey http://davidwahl.org/category/woodworking/

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