LumberJocks

Cutting a tapered hole

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by richgreer posted 10-02-2011 08:14 PM 6215 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4541 posts in 2539 days


10-02-2011 08:14 PM

Can anyone think of a way to cut a tapered hole? I want a hole in a 3/4 piece of wood that is 1” in diameter at one end and 1 1/8” in diameter at the other.

The best idea that I have come up with is to make an insert on the lathe that I stick into a bigger (1.5”) hole. I small lip hanging over the top edge would be acceptable and it would hide any imperfect fit of the insert into the bigger hole.

I keep thinking there must be a better way. I just don’t know what it is.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.


13 replies so far

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4225 posts in 3198 days


#1 posted 10-02-2011 08:24 PM

Hi Rich!
Hmmm, I’d taper a 1 1/8” flat spade bit down 1/16th each side, so that the 1” diameter was 3/4” down from the beginning of the taper. Though if the quality of the finished hole is very important, this suggestion may not work well for you.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View RogerBean's profile

RogerBean

1602 posts in 2418 days


#2 posted 10-02-2011 08:30 PM

Rich,
Poopiekat’s suggestion is a good one. An alternative: Is the piece something you can spin in your lathe? Might work. The more I think about it, the more I think Poopikat’s approach is the one I would try first.
Just a thought.
Roger

-- "Everybody makes mistakes. A craftsman always fixes them." (Monty Kennedy, "The Checkering and Carving of Gunstocks", 1952)

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4541 posts in 2539 days


#3 posted 10-02-2011 08:33 PM

That is a very good idea that I had not thought of. Thank you.

I would probably initially cut a 1” hole with a forstner bit and use the spade bit to ream it out a bit.

If the hole is a little rough, I would make a tapered wooden plug on the lathe, wrap some sandpaper around it and use it to clean up the hole.

Thanks again. I knew I came to the right place.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View IrreverentJack's profile

IrreverentJack

724 posts in 2307 days


#4 posted 10-02-2011 08:35 PM

Rich, What Poopiekat suggests – but use a 1” bit first then the tapered 1 1/8” one. I was just looking at a bow making site. He described how to make a tapered holes to mount horn tips on his bow ends. -Jack

View tom427cid's profile

tom427cid

294 posts in 1935 days


#5 posted 10-02-2011 08:42 PM

Hi Rich,
Looks like everybody has the same idea. I would add when you grind the bit that to grind a relief on the back side of the cutting edge and it will work quite well.I have a number of bits that I have modified for this purpose and with the edge on the side does a very nice job.
tom

-- "certified sawdust maker"

View daltxguy's profile

daltxguy

1373 posts in 3378 days


#6 posted 10-02-2011 08:51 PM

Yes, it’s called a reamer. Jennie Alexander designed one for creating tapered holes for tapered chair legs. I copied her design and there is a picture here. I used a keyhole saw sharpened like a scraper on the backside.
http://lumberjocks.com/daltxguy/blog/19528

-- If you can't joint it, bead it!

View docholladay's profile

docholladay

1287 posts in 2523 days


#7 posted 10-03-2011 05:57 AM

If it were me, I would use a tapered reamer. I would dill the whole the size of the smaller diameter, I would use a tapered reamer to taper and enlarge the larger side.

Doc

-- Hey, woodworking ain't brain surgery. Just do something and keep trying till you get it. Doc

View jerkylips's profile

jerkylips

273 posts in 2034 days


#8 posted 10-05-2011 10:18 PM

How “perfect” does the hole need to be? My first thought was to find the angle needed for that taper & use a jig saw/scroll saw with the table set to that angle. It might be tough to get a perfect circle without some sort of jig, though..

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

3599 posts in 1951 days


#9 posted 10-05-2011 10:36 PM

I have a “Brace and Bit” that I use for that function. The bit was made by Stanley somewhere around 1900 or 1910 and is tapered from 1 1/4 to 3/4” for a 6/4 board. My brain isn’t working well right now due to some mind numbing pain meds, but that would seem to fit your needs.

Alternatively, if the angle doesn’t need constant contact for the wood for strength, why not a “Stepper” bit, sold at your favorite box shop or HF. You could also wrap a piece of sand paper around the bit afterward and shove it into the hole again to increase the glue surface.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View Viktor's profile

Viktor

456 posts in 2883 days


#10 posted 10-05-2011 11:30 PM

Drill a 1” hole, then use a dovetail bit with round template and bushing to widen the opposite side. Dovetail bits usually have 1/8 slope which over 3/4” depth would give you diameter on the other side = ... 1.1875” (1 1/5”) …damn!... Why do you need 1.125”? Just make it 1.1875”.

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4225 posts in 3198 days


#11 posted 10-06-2011 01:51 AM

Rich,
I hope you found your solution to this problem. You didn’t say, but what the heck are you trying to build, with that tapered hole? We gots to know….

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Mark's profile

Mark

1801 posts in 2738 days


#12 posted 10-06-2011 02:08 AM

cut the circle out on a scroll saw with the base angled to whatever angle it may need to be…just an idea :S

-- M.K.

View Rambo's profile

Rambo

7 posts in 2759 days


#13 posted 10-06-2011 02:29 AM

Have you thought about a stepped drill bit?

or maybe a tapered reamer

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com