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Kunz Planes..

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Forum topic by jeth posted 09-30-2011 03:32 PM 6948 views 1 time favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jeth

249 posts in 2303 days


09-30-2011 03:32 PM

Topic tags/keywords: plane

hello all, just wondering if anyone owns or has at least played with one of the Kunz “premium” planes, they don’t look half bad and are supposedly “Made from durable stress-annealed cast iron, the soles and sides of these planes are precisely milled to be flat and square” , and also “sure to excite the hand tool enthusiast”...
So, opinions, experiences anyone, worth getting excited about?

I like the idea of the norris adjuster. I am looking at alternatives, LN being just a bit out of my price range and I honestly don’t like the look of the LV planes. These weigh in at around the same price as the LV, $200 for a smoother, $230 for a jack.

edit: posted direct link to online photo and came out rather laarge…


10 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

8309 posts in 3113 days


#1 posted 09-30-2011 04:12 PM

I can tell by looking these planes are very well made, and if you
like the way they look or the balance or something, buy them –
but don’t expect to get Norris performance from a plane
like this.

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13003 posts in 2158 days


#2 posted 09-30-2011 04:14 PM

But Loren, it’s got a Norrise style adjuster? ;)

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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Dan

3630 posts in 2345 days


#3 posted 09-30-2011 04:21 PM

This Kunz plane was one of many reviewed in FWW magazine this year. I cant remember what month or issue but it was reviewed with all the other new planes on the market and if I remember correct the Kunz came up with a decent/good review. Looks nice. If you get one let us know how it works.

-- Dan - "Collector of Hand Planes"

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jeth

249 posts in 2303 days


#4 posted 09-30-2011 04:44 PM

Well yeah, I was in no way comparing it to a Norris plane, I said “I like the idea of the norris adjuster”, which I do, as I have never been overwhelmed by the adjustment on Bailey style planes, mind you, I never owned a decent quality plane.

As you say Loren, it looks very well made in the pic, nice clean casting and the handle looks very comfy, big fat front knob, looks maybe a bit better sized for someone like myself with largish hands. Shpaewise both the wooden handles are very attractive to my eyes, I prefer a darker tone but I could always refeinish if it mattered.
It’s not always as simple as “if you like the look of it, buy it”, I’m located a little off the map, shipping is a killer, budget limited and when I buy it has to be a tool that is going to serve me for years. I am not like others who may buy a certain tool just to give it a whirl then stick it on the shelf among the others. Basically, I can afford one plane for smoothing, at the moment its between this and a Quangsheng/Woodriver. More difficult still when you can’t actually get to see or handle the options.

One thought is the blade looks to be very short, ie not interchangeable with commonly available sizes, and the cap iron looks quite thin, but that could be deliberate (flex/pressure fit?)

Thanks for the info on the review Dan, will look that up.

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Bertha

13003 posts in 2158 days


#5 posted 09-30-2011 04:49 PM

The price strikes me as a bit high but it may very well be worth every penny. I still see it as within striking distance of a LN, moneywise. $200 will get you part of the way to a real Norris adjuster, too. I guess I’m just all too quick to point out any flaws I can in new planes, being an old Stanley guy and all.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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jeth

249 posts in 2303 days


#6 posted 09-30-2011 04:49 PM

Damn, found the article, members only :(

Found this tho’, a fairly detailed breakdown if not a real “review”.

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jeth

249 posts in 2303 days


#7 posted 09-30-2011 05:02 PM

Al, what do you mean by a “real Norris adjuster”? Take a look at the link I just posted, not made by Norris, obviously (that would be tricky) but the adjuster looks good and is supposedly “improved” over existing designs :)

View Loren's profile

Loren

8309 posts in 3113 days


#8 posted 09-30-2011 05:07 PM

You know, fine work can be accomplished with an old Bailey tuned
up nice. These premium planes are heavier and come tuned up out
of the box when new. Some of them hold resale value very well
too. You might be surprised what something like an Ulmia horn
smoother can do as well.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 2580 days


#9 posted 09-30-2011 05:26 PM

I think its a looking to be a deasent plane and a step up from the stanley copy´s they made before
but then agaim I´m more into wooden planes
and I second Loren here about the Ulmia´s E.C.E. planes is also very good wooden planes
on same level as Ulmia but often a bit sheaper than Ulmia not much but every peny count´s :-)

Dennis

View Gary Roberts's profile

Gary Roberts

140 posts in 2487 days


#10 posted 10-01-2011 01:47 AM

Tread carefully. The older Kunz tools were junk. Looking good means nothing. It’s in the design and the construction that the difference will be apparent. As for FWW, they have the unfortunate habit of praising tools pushed by their big advertisers.

If you want a good plane, Ulmia can’t be beat, both old models and new ones. ECE also. Older Stanleys are excellent. Woodriver if you want to put the work in on them and buy a new blade. LN if you have the cash.

Me, I’m an Ulmia and old Stanley sorta guy along with a lot of woodies. Take your time and don’t feel rushed into buying stuff.

-- Gary Roberts, http://toolemera.com

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