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Shop-built rip fence input

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Forum topic by jaydubya posted 09-29-2011 02:57 AM 2417 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jaydubya

183 posts in 2273 days


09-29-2011 02:57 AM

Im in the planning stages of a T-square style rip fence (my inspiration http://techtalk.parts-express.com/showthread.php?p=1588940) for my table saw. Im looking for some input. Given a chioce, would you make the fence itself out of steel tube or aluminum extrusion with T-slots? How far, if any would you extend the fence to the front and rear of the saw table? Is a longer fence even better or desirable? it would seem the longer the fence, the more stable


9 replies so far

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Mickey Cassiba

312 posts in 2493 days


#1 posted 09-29-2011 03:24 AM

I love my Unifence…but a t slot or two would make it so much more lovable

-- One of these hammers oughta fix that...

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bluekingfisher

1246 posts in 2441 days


#2 posted 09-29-2011 10:37 AM

Interesting thread jay, I built a rip fence for an old contractor saw some years ago. I used 3” x 2” rectangular steed tube for the main fence. I used angle iron for the T bar to run along the guide rails and that seemed to work OK for me. I didn’t design in a means of adjustment but I got it as close a possible to square (spot weld) then just shimmed the face plate on the fence to bring it square with the blade when I locked the fence down, not ideal but it served me well for the few years I used it.

I too pondered on the best lenght for the fence. I figured the longer the fence the more support it would offer, particularly for longer stock. I made mine to overhang about an 1 – 1/2” either end, again this worked OK for me. However, just after I made the fence I was visiting a saw mill to collect some plywood when I noticed the large rip saw in the yard had a very short fence. It was shaped like the prow of a ship, longer at the top of the fence and shorter at the bottom. When I spoke to the operator he told me the reason for the short fence was to reduce the chance of kickback. The bottom of the fence was slightly behind the centre of the arbour to prevent pinching against the fence.
The saw looked like it was a hundred years old so I guess it must have worked otherwise they would have gotten rid of it?

I have read a couple of threads on the LJ site about making a home made fence. From memory the response was quite mixed, some considered it worth while building if you had the materials lying around anyway or just wanted the experience of making one but the majoritys view was it would be more worthwhile and economically viable to buy an after market fence.

Can’t throw any info on the alu extrusion, sorry.

David

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

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jaydubya

183 posts in 2273 days


#3 posted 09-29-2011 01:59 PM

I was thinking about going with a delta t2 fence, But I have some reservations about wether the rails would be strong enough to support a double 3/4 MDF extension that comes out at least 30 inches from the saw. I plan to use 2 1/2 angle for mine, so I know mine will be plenty stout. I figure the materials will cost me about 120 and Ill have to have a welding shop throw down a few welds for me. My goal is to come in under the cost of the T2 to have something heavier duty that I built myself

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bluekingfisher

1246 posts in 2441 days


#4 posted 09-29-2011 03:42 PM

I think by the time you pay for the welding you may be close to your T2 fence price. However you will have a fence you designed and built yourself (nice conversation topic for your friends)

I don’t know the T2 at all but I would have thought the commercial fence would have some kind of means of adjustment?? which could come in handy.

How do you intend to lock the fence down? will you be going with a cam lock type arrangement or have you got your own design in mind?

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

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jaydubya

183 posts in 2273 days


#5 posted 09-30-2011 05:39 AM

Actually, there will be very little welding involved. I can actually only think of 3 or 4 beads that will need to be laid down. Wouldnt take someone 5 minutes, And i actually know some farmers with welders if the local welding shop wants more than 20 bucks for it LOL. The fence will ride on 1/8×1 brass bar at the top and front, with 1/2 inch set screws to adjust height and blade paralellism. Ive thought of doing a cam lock, but I think at least in version 1.0 I will use a toggle clamp like this http://www.thetoggleclampstore.com/36092.html

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bluekingfisher

1246 posts in 2441 days


#6 posted 09-30-2011 10:27 AM

Good luck with it Jay, be sure to post a couple of pictures of it for me too see when you are done.

Here in the UK we don’t seem to have any access to after market fences. I have always been a fan of the “T” bar type fence, hence my attempt at building my own, and pretty good it worked out to.

I have a couple of downloaded plans from woodworkers who have built their own in various styles which may be of assistance to you?.

I’m not great on IT so not sure how to post them on here or to your PM box (unless you do and would like them) if not ,you may still be able to find them on the net. Of course you may have it all planned out already?

It’s just that they provide step by step instructions and photos, which I found useful when building the locking handle.

Good luck

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

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lilredweldingrod

2495 posts in 2568 days


#7 posted 09-30-2011 11:17 AM

Jay, I just gave my new T-2 fence to a neighbor. I love it. I only gave it away because I bought an new Grizzly cabinet saw. My T-2 extended about 8-9 inches beyond my old Ridgid contractors top. I don’t know why you would need or want any more than that. With the T-2 going for $150 you can’t go wrong. The home made will cost more in materials and not to speak of the time involved.

Question; what are you putting this on? A cabinet saw? A hybred? Contractors? Do you have a riving knife?

Good luck. Rand

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jaydubya

183 posts in 2273 days


#8 posted 10-01-2011 02:04 AM

Rand, I feel like I can build this and come in under the cost of the T2. I partially want to do it as a personal “look what I can do” thing LOL. I dont think you can really factor in your time when you chose to take on a project like this. Im discovering how enjoyable time in the shop can be. I havent looked at a T2 but with it being referred to as a “biese lite” Im a little concerned that it will be able to support the 30×27 double MDF router wing that I have planned for the right side. It will be going on a Craftsman 21833 saw. Some people consider it a big contractor saw although I cant imagine moving it around to a jobsite. it does have a riving knife

Bluekingfisher. I would definitely like to see the plans you have. I pretty much have mine planned out, but im certainly not above “borrowing” ideas from others if they are better than mine LOL. Do you know how to attatch a file to an email? If so, I will PM you my email address. Id love to see what you have

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jaydubya

183 posts in 2273 days


#9 posted 10-01-2011 04:55 AM

I thought about bolting it together but couldnt figure out how to secure the alignment and make sure it isnt aboe to move around. Thought about roll pins and a tapered nut setup. I cant see the welding warping the metal to a noticable degree, and if it did I could probably adjust it back out being that I will have 5 points of contact and adjustment points, one at each end of the front of the angle, one at each end on the topside, and the cam or clamp that I will ise to lock it down. Im having trouble finding an appropriately priced/sized cam lever to usehing is too small or 40 dollars LOL

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