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DW735 Byrd Shelix Head introduces snipe.

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Forum topic by NeophyteGrant posted 01-10-2019 11:40 PM 432 views 1 time favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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NeophyteGrant

92 posts in 749 days


01-10-2019 11:40 PM

Topic tags/keywords: shelix helical byrd dw735 planer

Hi All:

This has been rehashed on the non-OEM models, here and elsewhere, but I haven’t found a serviceable solution for an OEM cutterhead, so I again pose the question.

I installed a Byrd OEM DW735 cutterhead on my planer and it has introduced both trailing and leading snipe about 3 inches (or, what I estimate the difference between the cut and the rollers are) off the end of the stock. The snipe is about .002-.003, and though not the end of the world, surely a downer for such an investment to create an issue that wasn’t there prior. Previously, I had no noticeable snipe with the straight HSS knives. It also bears mentioning I do have the DeWalt extension tables.

I consulted numerous forum threads about adjusting the slot screws and angling the infeed and outfeed, or one or the other up to varying degrees to provide leverage when the rollers engage or disengage. I’ve tried angling both infeed and outfeed up from level to as far as 1/8”, and the problem persists at each pitch of the tables. I’ve also tried leveling them out using a 36” LV straightedge across the entire length of the bed as well to achieve perfect level—although mechanically that seems like it wouldn’t address the issue.

I posed the question to Byrd and they are going to get back to me. It appears most of the pressure issue from the rollers is on the smaller head diameters, not my model.

Has anyone found snipe solutions involving modifying the rollers? I have noticed some crowning (which flexes down under pressure) on the aluminum bed, and thought maybe inconsistencies in the flatness of the bed were affecting the movement between rollers. My thought was to cover the bed with melamine as an auxiliary bed.

I’ve been going at it a week in search of a solution…if anyone has ideas they’d be appreciated?

-- Chicago, IL


15 replies so far

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5819 posts in 3054 days


#1 posted 01-11-2019 12:09 AM

I have used Melanie as an auxiliary bed, and it removes all snipe. It’s not always practical though, and messes up the thickness stop settings.

I really can’t believe you can’t eliminate the snipe with indeed / out feed adjustments. I have the Shelix / 735 setup and it works great.

Are you using freshly jointed lumber, or something else? How long are the boards? I wouldn’t expect a portable planer to be snipe free on 8 foot long boards unless you had additional support.

Actually .002 snipe sounds pretty reasonable. I’ll bet most stationary planers have at least that much.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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NeophyteGrant

92 posts in 749 days


#2 posted 01-12-2019 12:14 AM

I’m using freshly jointed lumber and I’ve done everything from almost 2 feet to about 38 inches. I do seem to have almost removed the leading snipe. I could very well be doing it wrong, so I rigged up a graphic. I also feel like I’ve failed to control for variables well.

What I do is set the tables level and flat to where they meet the integral bed, using a straight edge from tip of the extension infeed/outfeed, respectively, to under that respective roller. Then I lean the outer end up so that the inner end sits from 1/64 to 1/8 below flush with integral bed. I’ve done several increments (though it’s difficult to be too precise with a ruler in hand while balancing and that doesn’t seem to do much—in some cases seems to exacerbate it).

Ideally, I’d lay the straightedge across he entire setup—infeed, bed, to outfeed—but there is a crown right under the cutter that means I can’t reference off of flat. Now that I think of it, I might tip both tables to be even with that crown, if I can.

All that said, I think that the .002 snipe might be something I just didn’t notice with the HSS straight cutter and that it does sound pretty reasonable.

sighs My dream is that all of my machines could be perfectly set up and stay that way but I need to shut up and just make some sawdust.

-- Chicago, IL

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socrbent

742 posts in 2510 days


#3 posted 01-12-2019 02:24 AM

Grant, I have a 735 and sometimes get snipe which i can see and feel at the transition. Slight up pressure on end of board while feeding and removing board does seem to help.

My question is – can you fell the snipe? Wondering at .002 whether is able to be felt?

-- socrbent Ohio

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socrbent

742 posts in 2510 days


#4 posted 01-12-2019 02:26 AM

oops – duplicate post

-- socrbent Ohio

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NeophyteGrant

92 posts in 749 days


#5 posted 01-12-2019 03:21 AM

Interestingly, you can. You can see the ridge of the dip too, when light rakes over it too. I don’t think someone not looking or maybe not feeling would. I’ve seemed to make the snipe visibly and tactiley disappear of the front edge, so I’m not sure what’s leading to what—adjustments in the dark. I think I have the infeed at level now. I haven’t been able to see what the effect is on different size boards. It’s just difficult to control for. I haven’t heard back from Byrd (still) but I’m hoping they might have some insight.

I think I’ll prob just go with it and sand it out/lop it off, whatever works. The more I repeat .002 the more I think there is no way a DeWalt lunchbox CANT snipe .002. I think my tolerance expectations might be too high.

Hell, there is a .0015-.002 belly on my 1k dollar jointer outfeed.

-- Chicago, IL

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

2130 posts in 2588 days


#6 posted 01-12-2019 04:10 AM

I have a 735 with regular blades. Snipe seems to come and go with no particular cause so I plane my boards before jointing the edges or cutting to final dimensions that way any snipe will be in the cuttoffs. I also keep a close eye out for any snipe when sanding so I can sand it out. Truthfully, even if there is a slight snipe I can usually sand it out without a discernible difference when I run my hand over the board. Maybe I have gotten used to work arounds to solve the snipe problem but I went through a time when I tried everything I could think of to correct the problem. Most of the tinkering made things worse, not better and I wasted a lot of good boards messing about. I finally reconciled myself to seeing it occasionally and dealing with it.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5819 posts in 3054 days


#7 posted 01-12-2019 05:50 AM

Set the infeed / outfeed tables so they are even with the planer bed, and raise by 3/32” or 1/8” at their outer edge.

The easiest way to do this is place a 3/32” spacer on the planer bed. Lay a long level on that, and raise the outer edge of the tables to meet the straightedge. Try that, and increase the spacer to 1/8” if needed.

Then again if you have a crown in the planer bed, the substrate may have delaminated. Hopefully it’s not too bad.

My main point is the inside edges of the tables should NOT dip lower than the planer bed.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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NeophyteGrant

92 posts in 749 days


#8 posted 01-12-2019 06:05 AM

I’ll try with the spacer, pinto, that’s a good idea. Earl, my brain must be fried tonight (I didn’t even have a nightcap!) But what does planing before edge jointing—what does that accomplish? I feel like my mind almoooost has it.

-- Chicago, IL

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therealSteveN

1907 posts in 814 days


#9 posted 01-12-2019 12:10 PM

Snipe is a problem with ANY planer. If you can fix it, it will lie in support, always buy, and use the in/out feed tables, OR as already suggested use a large flat board, or ply/sheet good to make a huge table, but that does mess with any depth gauge.

The other is the amount of pressure on the infeed, and outfeed rollers which of course can/will angle the board entering down, and if enough you get both ends. Supposedly there is a “just right” for any planer. Finding, and maintaining it may prove problematic.

Absolutely no magic answer just a bunch of trial and error, until you are happy. In your case it would appear if you had no snipe with the standard drum, and blades, and now you do with the Byrd, that you have a total circumference discrepancy. Finding out exactly what that figure is, will let you know how much adjustment to make on your rollers.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

3744 posts in 2229 days


#10 posted 01-12-2019 12:35 PM

I have adjusted my 735 and at best get 0.002” and happy with that.

You can eliminate snipe by running boards end to end and use some scrap boards first and last.

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NeophyteGrant

92 posts in 749 days


#11 posted 01-12-2019 07:30 PM

Well guys, it’s a moot point for the time being because my shop got robbed last night. The planer was the only thing they could carry out through the alley. Luckly, my neighbor got the SOBs and license plate on camera…though the planer with the shelix head is probably already on the black market by now…

-- Chicago, IL

View Scap's profile

Scap

59 posts in 167 days


#12 posted 01-12-2019 07:48 PM



Well guys, it s a moot point for the time being because my shop got robbed last night. The planer was the only thing they could carry out through the alley. Luckly, my neighbor got the SOBs and license plate on camera…though the planer with the shelix head is probably already on the black market by now…

- NeophyteGrant

That sucks. Sorry to hear, and hope you recover your property.

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NeophyteGrant

92 posts in 749 days


#13 posted 01-12-2019 08:31 PM

Luckily, they only grabbed hand power tools, the planer, an air compressor, and brad nail gun. Things that all have no set up time involved—well besides the planer. Make sure you always have that insurance folks! Sucks to be out a deductible but better than 2 grand.

-- Chicago, IL

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ArtMann

1220 posts in 1056 days


#14 posted 01-12-2019 09:37 PM

I would not refer to the Byrd head as OEM. The OEM cutter head has knives.

View stefang's profile

stefang

16219 posts in 3575 days


#15 posted 01-12-2019 10:16 PM

I am sorry to hear your planer was stolen. I assume you will be getting a new one. I just bought a DW 733 planer which isn’t delivered yet. However, I do have a combi machine with a planer that also produces snipe. I just lift the workpiece a little as it goes in and do the same when it’s coming out and that completely eliminates any snipe. I’m not sure it will work on the DW733, but I will give it a try anyway if I get any snipe otherwise, and I’m pretty sure I will.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

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