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damaged chisel tip

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Forum topic by Pabs posted 01-10-2019 02:14 PM 453 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Pabs

259 posts in 3694 days


01-10-2019 02:14 PM

hey guys

I was sharpening my chisels last night and noticed damage to the corner of one of my chisels.

what’s the best way to fix this? or is it too much damage to fix?

-- Pabs


17 replies so far

View RobHannon's profile

RobHannon

222 posts in 771 days


#1 posted 01-10-2019 02:33 PM

I would just grind the bevel back till the chip is gone. Make sure to keep the steel cool.

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Pabs

259 posts in 3694 days


#2 posted 01-10-2019 02:40 PM



I would just grind the bevel back till the chip is gone. Make sure to keep the steel cool.

- RobHannon

would I need a stone with a lower grit than what I have for that? I’m using a combination water stone (1000/4000)

-- Pabs

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RobHannon

222 posts in 771 days


#3 posted 01-10-2019 02:48 PM

Bench grinder will be fastest, but grab some wet/dry sandpaper and a piece of glass or marble/granite tile. Alternatively you could use cast top of a tablesaw or jointer, but I would do it dry if you are on steel. It will take some time, but certainly fixable.

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Pabs

259 posts in 3694 days


#4 posted 01-10-2019 02:57 PM



Bench grinder will be fastest, but grab some wet/dry sandpaper and a piece of glass or marble/granite tile. Alternatively you could use cast top of a tablesaw or jointer, but I would do it dry if you are on steel. It will take some time, but certainly fixable.

- RobHannon

I have a piece of flat glass that I use to flatten my stones, I could stick some wet / dry sandpaper to it I guess. And you would grind at the same angle I presume (30 in my case)?. I use a jig to ensure I keep the chisel at proper angle.. not advanced enough to free hand it! :)

-- Pabs

View AESamuel's profile

AESamuel

88 posts in 1463 days


#5 posted 01-10-2019 02:58 PM

Easily fixable, either use coarse (less than 150 grit) sandpaper on something reasonably flat or better a bench grinder to grind the bevel back to below the chip. Chisels get this kind of damage all the time and are plenty long enough to be reground multiple times.

I would caution you against doing it with your waterstones, at 1000 grit it would take forever, and you will wear your waterstones very quickly doing it.

View BlueRidgeDog's profile

BlueRidgeDog

88 posts in 20 days


#6 posted 01-10-2019 03:00 PM

120 grit on your belt sander, frequent dips in water to stay cool.

View Underdog's profile

Underdog

1248 posts in 2276 days


#7 posted 01-10-2019 03:15 PM

I’d use a benchtop grinder with frequent dips in water to stay cool. Don’t ever let the steel get hot enough to change color or you’ll lose your temper.
If you straighten that by hand it’ll take a long time.
Get it close with the finest grinder or sander you have, then take it down the rest of the way with your stones.

-- Jim, Georgia, USA

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RobHannon

222 posts in 771 days


#8 posted 01-10-2019 04:12 PM


I have a piece of flat glass that I use to flatten my stones, I could stick some wet / dry sandpaper to it I guess. And you would grind at the same angle I presume (30 in my case)?. I use a jig to ensure I keep the chisel at proper angle.. not advanced enough to free hand it! :)

- Pabs

Unless you are unhappy with the bevel angle, I would leave it at is. Alternatively, you could sand/grind the tip flat till the chip is gone, then grind an hone that blunt end into a microbevel that you are happy with. Dunno if I would go that route myself, but I am not what anyone would call a handtool woodworker.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12469 posts in 2620 days


#9 posted 01-10-2019 05:02 PM

Grind flat and straight across then regrind the bevel. Faster than trying to sharpen it out.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Peteybadboy's profile

Peteybadboy

572 posts in 2190 days


#10 posted 01-10-2019 05:25 PM

325 grit diamond stone will do that quickly, then work your way up to 4000, you can also use sand paper as others have suggested (on glass for example)

-- Petey

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Pabs

259 posts in 3694 days


#11 posted 01-10-2019 05:59 PM

I’m gonna try sanding on my glass plate to see if that works…I’m afraid of running it on a bench grinder or belt sander…anything powered, I rather take my time and not ruin it. Thanks for all the tips, you guys rock!

-- Pabs

View jutsFL's profile

jutsFL

162 posts in 82 days


#12 posted 01-10-2019 06:21 PM

I like the idea above about grinding flat, then redoing the bevel… Seems like a fairly quick fix. Although none of the suggestions are going to be too fast unless you have a bench grinder or belt sander.

-- I've quickly learned that being a woodworker isn't about making flawless work, rather it's fixing all the mistakes you made so that it appears flawless to others! Jay - FL

View Pabs's profile

Pabs

259 posts in 3694 days


#13 posted 01-10-2019 06:33 PM



I like the idea above about grinding flat, then redoing the bevel… Seems like a fairly quick fix. Although none of the suggestions are going to be too fast unless you have a bench grinder or belt sander.

- jutsFL


well, I’m worried that if I don’t grind perfectly (keeping square to the edge) that I will end up with a bigger problem. how would you ensure a perfectly square grind?

-- Pabs

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

15822 posts in 2859 days


#14 posted 01-10-2019 07:06 PM

Small square and a black marker across the back will be enough to set the line for grinding.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View JayT's profile (online now)

JayT

6014 posts in 2451 days


#15 posted 01-10-2019 07:20 PM


Small square and a black marker across the back will be enough to set the line for grinding.

- Smitty_Cabinetshop

This.

You are far less likely to burn the edge of a chisel or plane blade on a grinder by following Woodknack’s advice. I grind square, then grind the bevel until there is just a very small flat left on the tip. At that point, it’s time to go to the stones. If you grind all the way to a sharp tip, the risk of burning increases greatly.

Another way to help prevent overheating is to dress the grinder wheel with a bit of a crown. That way you are only grinding one point instead of the whole width of the grinding wheel. It helps a lot in controlling temps and doesn’t really add any time.

-- In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

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