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Air Power - Filtration-Regulation-Lubrication

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Forum topic by bluekingfisher posted 09-21-2011 12:40 PM 1190 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bluekingfisher

1246 posts in 2447 days


09-21-2011 12:40 PM

I don’t use a heck of a lot of air power in my shop, other than for using 18G and pinner nailers but have several other tools which I have picked up at sales or from discount stores (die grinder, drill, 1/2” ratchet) which I would like to start using but I think changing the air pressures from tool to tool would soon grind me down.

I always try to look after and maintain my tools as much as possible, draining the compressor each evening and a few drops of oil in the brad nailer.

To further enhance there longevity I was looking at installing a regulator/filter. I then came across one with a lubrication unit.

I have only seen them online so have no idea of actual size but they do look quite big and bulky?? Do they fit directly onto the compressor?? I would have thought not due to their size? Therefore if they need to be standalone could they be bolted to a wall or cabinet? this being the case how would it work with a small portable compressor.

The other question is, if I have different tools requiring different pressures would I need a regulator for each tool? or have a regulator for the “air greedy” tools and just use the regulator on the compressor for the majority of tools??

I hope this has made sense. Thanks in advance.

David

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan


12 replies so far

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bluekingfisher

1246 posts in 2447 days


#1 posted 09-21-2011 04:03 PM

Hi Rick – I just run a hose from the compressor, it’s a hobby shop only.

My concern was that when using something heavy like a air sander then switching to a small pin nailer the high pressure for the sander would blow the seals in the smaller more fragile tool?? Is this the case or am I just being over anxious?

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

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bluekingfisher

1246 posts in 2447 days


#2 posted 09-21-2011 04:06 PM

Just looked at the hyper link you sent – No, that is way above my requirements, I was talking about the small regulator/filter (about the size of a soda can) that fits somewhere between compressor and air tool.

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

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CampD

1475 posts in 2953 days


#3 posted 09-21-2011 04:42 PM

If you plan to use a spray gun in the future, I would not add a lubricator to the system.
Lubricator’s are IMO just for big shops that will only be using tools that need oiling, just stick to adding a few drops directly in to your tools.

Air filter/regulator is a good investment to keep junk from getting into your tools and ruining the seals.
For the amount of use it seems that you’ll be doing just a small one is all you need.

If you do plan on spraying in the future (we all end up that way) I would recommend a filter/water seperator

-- Doug...

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bluekingfisher

1246 posts in 2447 days


#4 posted 09-21-2011 04:50 PM

Thanks Doug, that makes perfect sense. The only thing I am having trouble with is where do you install the regulator/filter, on the compressor or at the tool end?

I’m guessing at the compressor end where it is not so much in the way…I’ll try it see how it goes. Thanks

David

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

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chrisstef

15677 posts in 2474 days


#5 posted 09-21-2011 06:08 PM

I think what you’re talking about is an in line seperator. It would be located between the tool and the line. If it is an in line sperator youre talking about it should be for removing any water or condensation in the line which can cause your tool to freeze. I could definately be totally wrong on the whole premise though lol.

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk

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CampD

1475 posts in 2953 days


#6 posted 09-21-2011 06:15 PM

I’ve got mine (filter/seperator/regulator) mounted on the wall next to the compressure and run a short length of hose to hook-it up when needed. My compressure has a regulator on it and its always set for 100psi, most tools run fine with this pressure except for the real air hogs, IE: grinder or DA.
I sometimes set it lower when using the pin nailer, may bury them to deep.
My Filter/seperator I only use for the spray gun and it stays set @ 40

-- Doug...

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bluekingfisher

1246 posts in 2447 days


#7 posted 09-21-2011 08:15 PM

Chris,Doug, Rick – thanks for the info fellahs, it’s beginnig to make a little more sense now. It may well be that I just go for the filter to catch all the moisture and just stick to dropping a few drops of oil in the tool at the end of play and keep the psi as is. It has worked OK so far.

Thanks again all

David

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

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gfadvm

14940 posts in 2157 days


#8 posted 09-22-2011 04:05 AM

I did blow the seal in my HF pin nailer with too much pressure but my Ridgid brad and finish nailers did’t have a problem with the same pressure. Still use the HF pin nailer @ 90 psi. It hisses a lot but works fine!

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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bluekingfisher

1246 posts in 2447 days


#9 posted 09-22-2011 10:08 AM

I have my compressor set at 90psi too but I like the idea of the filter to weed all the gunk out prior to it getting into the tool.

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

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Flyin636

57 posts in 1961 days


#10 posted 09-22-2011 02:27 PM

Installing a “fruitjar” type moisture trap anywhere near compressor is pretty much a waste of time.Regulator,yes….but those fruitjars were a pipedream thought up more as marketing hype than anything else.Its sort of feelgood marketing.Now,if you had the hardlines runnin a ways to say a paintbooth then they might collect sumthin.

Google some info on “rigging” up some form of expansion area right after compressor.This is if you don’t want the expense of otherwise,very good refrigerated “dryers”.You can also invest in desicant dryers that work well at compressor…....but they ain’t cheap either.A series of loops in the plumbing right after compressor cools air allowing moisture to seperate out of airstream.Many ways to skin that cat…....throw a loop of hose(just for conversation)in a tub of ice water….then use gravity and that would be a hillbilly way of accomplishing this cooling.

There are some extremely efficient(read cheap) ways to cool and subsequently remove moisture….but inters the realm of internet issues with any engineering.Google is your friend.

Be very aware of hose contamination WRT spraying.We like to use the newest/bestest hoses for all finishing…..gradually cycling these for other tools as they age…...getting new hoses at general intervals for finishing.Good luck,636

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Gregn

1642 posts in 2451 days


#11 posted 09-22-2011 03:55 PM

Hi David, Looking at your shop and the air compressor that you have my suggestion would be to mount a moisture trap/air regulator on the wall above the air compressor. This will allow you to help keep moisture out of the air line and to be able to regulate air pressure for different air tools.

If you intend to run an air line around the shop to use air in different locations smaller air regulators can be installed at different connects and allow you to keep different air pressures at the different locations. Leaving the wall mounted unit set for the tools that are air hogs.

I have the one with the moisture trap and lubricator and have found that for the hobby shop this is not needed. As stated you can’t use the lubricator for spraying and even if you turn the lubricator off the oil in the line will still get in your finish.

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

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bluekingfisher

1246 posts in 2447 days


#12 posted 09-22-2011 04:16 PM

636/Greg – thanks for the info, it would appear from your and previous respondents it would appear that for my needs (hobbyist) I don’t really need this bit of kit? I guess I fell for the “glossy” advertisements, although for the price of one, if I end up buying it then find it is of no use it’s not going to have a drastic effect on the bank balance. It may be handy just to attach the regulator just for the odd time I use an air hungry tool, save me fiddling with the regulator on the compressor.

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

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