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Cordless Electric Chainsaw

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Forum topic by richgreer posted 09-20-2011 02:24 PM 6463 views 0 times favorited 31 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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richgreer

4524 posts in 1729 days


09-20-2011 02:24 PM

I need a small chainsaw to cut down some small trees and cut some branches off of existing trees. I’ve found that my cordless reciprocating can do the job, but VERY slowly and I am not that patient.

In the past I have found gas powered chainsaws to be dirty and temperamental. A corded electric chainsaw would work for me, but I would need to use a couple of 100’ extension cords and, IMO, that is too much.

Last night I noticed that Sears sells a little 12” cordless electric chainsaw. It uses a 19.2 volt battery. I might be just what I need or it might be a complete waste of money.

Does anyone have knowledge and/or experience with this chainsaw.

As an FYI – The biggest thing I would ever cut might have a 6” diameter and most of the cutting would be on stuff with a 2 – 4” diameter.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.


31 replies so far

View racerglen's profile

racerglen

2303 posts in 1435 days


#1 posted 09-20-2011 02:58 PM

Or if you have one of those inverter s on yr truck.. Our forest service crews use small electric saws that way..
Or..
Rent one ?

-- Glen, Vernon B.C. Canada

View PutnamEco's profile

PutnamEco

155 posts in 1940 days


#2 posted 09-20-2011 03:07 PM

Wait until this fall when Stihl comes out with their version, the MSA 160 C. The others on offer are little more than a cruel joke. Stihl has a large enough battery to give some kind of run time.

The only other contender is the Makita BUC250RD which isn’t available in the USA. You could go gray market as Makita does have a 36v charger available in the USA. They do offer a 12v NiMh saw that I feel is really underpowered.

18v or less just isn’t really enough battery to make it worth upgrading from a reciprocating saw. If your happy with Black & Decker quality tools, you might find some joy in their current offerings. Ryobi also offers a saw. For me, I can’t justify spending money on a cheap tool like them, only to be disappointed in the operation and durability of the tool.

If you need this type of tool for a one off project you would be better off paying the money to hire a man with a saw. If your in it for the long run, do yourself a favor and buy a quality tool.

-- “The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.” ― Franklin D. Roosevelt

View juniorjock's profile

juniorjock

1930 posts in 2420 days


#3 posted 09-20-2011 03:36 PM

Rick, something to think about is the saws that are on poles that extend. They come electric or gas. You can remove the saw from the pole and use the saw as a standard chain saw too.

- JJ

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3659 posts in 1819 days


#4 posted 09-20-2011 03:53 PM

Don’t know much about battery operated ones, but I have a 14” McCullough corded electric one that I used for years with my motorhome to cut firewood while out camping, and to clean up fallen branches from the trees here in town. I have a couple of old gas powered ones that I haven’t used in 20 years. Gotta give ‘em to my son-in-law up in Fairbanks. They are stored in a wooden case I made about 30 plus years ago, and they look exactly like when I put them away. Gas powered chain saws are definitely not good for occasional use. That’s why a bought the electric one. That electric one works every time.

Consider the Honda generator/corded saw combo. Probably work without problems for years.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View Gregn's profile

Gregn

1642 posts in 1638 days


#5 posted 09-20-2011 04:11 PM

Here’s a couple of reviews on the 10” model if it helps any.
http://www.mysears.com/Craftsman-19-2-Volt-10-quot-Cordless-Chain-Saw-reviews

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4524 posts in 1729 days


#6 posted 09-20-2011 04:24 PM

Thanks for the excellent input. I had not thought of a generator or truck inverter. There is a good argument that I should have a generator for other purposes also.

If I want to stay with my cordless electric idea, Stihl looks like it is worth waiting for. However, the reviews on the Sears model are better than I expected and I am sure the Sears model is cheaper than what the Stihl will be.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4524 posts in 1729 days


#7 posted 09-20-2011 04:55 PM

Thanks CessnaPilotBarry – good points.

As I have said before, I could change my name to “PiperPilotRich”.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View PutnamEco's profile

PutnamEco

155 posts in 1940 days


#8 posted 09-20-2011 05:14 PM

Re: richgreer says:
”However, the reviews on the Sears model are better than I expected”

I believe the Craftsman is made by Ryobi. It seems to use their battery.

If you insist on going down toward 18v look into the Makita BUC122Z which at least is Lith-Ion.

I hope your not planning on doing more than a dozen cuts or cutting anything over 3-4 inches…

I would advise you to find some more reviews that are NOT on the site trying to sell you one…...

-- “The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.” ― Franklin D. Roosevelt

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4524 posts in 1729 days


#9 posted 09-20-2011 05:21 PM

Good points, PutnamEco.

As an FYI, my wife used to own a flower shop. There were several places on the internet where people offered reviews of her store. Most of the reviews were very positive. I know – I wrote most of them myself using different names. I probably should not admit that, but I share it just so other people know that this is a very common practice.

For the record, I never wrote a negative review on a competitor’s flower shop. That seemed to “cross a line” I didn’t want to cross, but I know it has been done by others.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View Eric_S's profile

Eric_S

1521 posts in 1849 days


#10 posted 09-20-2011 05:30 PM

How about this Rich… and yes its real. Good for camping.

http://www.thinkgeek.com/gadgets/tools/ea93/

-- - Eric Indianapolis, IN

View PutnamEco's profile

PutnamEco

155 posts in 1940 days


#11 posted 09-20-2011 05:56 PM

If your going to choose an electric, there are three competitors in the professional saw market. Stihl again would be my preference. The MSE220 is the most powerful electric saw easily available. Sthil also makes a homeowner grade pair of saws the MS140/180 C-BQ Husquavarna has their 316E which is a fairly good saw, but not as powerful as the big Stihl, nor is it as comfortable for me to use as the Stihl. Third would be the Makita UC3530A which has a real following among the chainsaw carvers, as, I believe, it spins at a higher RPM. To me it seems that this saw is the least powerful, it is however a very comfortable saw to use. All these saws use commonly available saw chains and bars.

A comparison in quality to these saws compared to Worx, Remington, Craftsman, etc. would be like comparing Bosch, Milwaukee, or Makita circular saws to Black & Decker, Ryobi, or Craftsman circular saws.

I made my living with chainsaws for a bunch of years and still work with them often.

-- “The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.” ― Franklin D. Roosevelt

View PutnamEco's profile

PutnamEco

155 posts in 1940 days


#12 posted 09-20-2011 06:10 PM

Re: EricS says
How about this?_

Wire saws can be easier to use and carry. I like the Military survival saw (NSN 5110-00-570-6896)

-- “The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.” ― Franklin D. Roosevelt

View Eric_S's profile

Eric_S

1521 posts in 1849 days


#13 posted 09-20-2011 06:56 PM

PutnamEco, the link I posted was a new item posted yesterday on a site I regularly visit earlier.

I’m pretty sure the one you posted would be much better quality. Thanks for your link to it. I’ve never heard of these.

-- - Eric Indianapolis, IN

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14746 posts in 2330 days


#14 posted 09-20-2011 09:59 PM

If you don’t have too many to do, a hand saw cuts green limbs faster than a reciprocating saw. That is what I use most of the time for small work rather than fiddle with my chainsaws.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View mtnwild's profile

mtnwild

3474 posts in 2181 days


#15 posted 09-20-2011 10:00 PM

I’ve been thinking the same thing. Then just the other day, I saw an infomercial on a new Oregon, electric chainsaw they are just introducing. Looks sweet!! They never said the price, so I,m thinking they are not cheap.

The Computer address is, GetPowerNowSaw.com…........
1-800-728-7503…...............

Check it out, I thought it looked pretty good. Course that’s what the commercial is supposed to do…......

-- mtnwild (Jack), It's not what you see, it's how you see it.

showing 1 through 15 of 31 replies

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