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Recommendations on Building a Frame (As Pictured)

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Forum topic by Cloves posted 1065 days ago 885 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Cloves

5 posts in 1065 days


1065 days ago

Hi everyone,

I am new to the forums and to wood working. I was hoping to get some feedback from experienced experts on what materials to use to build a fascade similar to the one pictured.

I am still trying to figure and/or find a material that is light, cheap, and easy enough to cut up my table saw and mitering saw.

Here is my initial plan of attack. Once I find what to actually build the frame out (I’m thinking pine so far), I was going to use the table saw to notch a grove in the center of each inner frame, giving me enough space to insert the acrylic sheet. Then cap off the top and then use pocket screws and glue to keep the frame attached.

1. Does anyone have suggestions as far as what material to use? I have been to HD and found pine, its affordable but I was wondering if anyone else had any other ideas. Ideally I would love to find something lighter but just as rigid you know what I mean?

2. How does everyone feel about the notching of the frame to insert the acrylic sheets? I think 2 passes on the table saw should give me the correct width and the pocket screws once inserted would give me great strength.


18 replies so far

View pjones46's profile

pjones46

209 posts in 1267 days


#1 posted 1064 days ago

You can do something like this with a table saw or a router table or Shaper. There are other styles and rail styles, mostly for router table or shaper. Western red cedar is about the lightest but pine is close.

-- God is great, the Beer is good and people are Crazy. www.pauljoneswoodworks.com

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1176 posts in 1248 days


#2 posted 1064 days ago

Use poplar. Almost as cheap as pine, not as many knots, straight grain paints better, more stable. Should I go on?

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

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ShaneA

5285 posts in 1223 days


#3 posted 1064 days ago

+1 on the stub tenon pictued above. if you use a scrap piece to set up your dado/tenon to be the thickness of the acrylic it should go together nicely. Easily accomplished on a tablesaw. Poplar may be a good choice for the wood. If you can find a hardwood retailer near you, chances are you can buy the wood for a lot cheaper than a big box store. Poplar will be cost effective and likely to have less defects than pine. Soft maple would also work.

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jumbojack

1176 posts in 1248 days


#4 posted 1064 days ago

The big orange sells poplar pretty cheap. Pocket screws will show and if you use butt joint construction your groove will show. Now if you miter the ends at 45 the groove will not show, but you’ve still got the pesky pocket screws, but if you are only going to see one side, what the heck. The ones shown appear to have a tenon cut on the rails (top and bottom. The fit into the groove in the stile (sides) and a little sanding will smooth them out so the joint hardly shows.
How thick are the panels?

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

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a1Jim

112008 posts in 2201 days


#5 posted 1064 days ago

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SalvageCraft

274 posts in 1150 days


#6 posted 1064 days ago

Not sure if you’ll find anything lighter than pine, but poplar would be my choice. Pine may have a tendency to move around on you as you mill it, especially the stuff from the box store. If you google for a hardwood dealer in your area, you’ll be able to get better quality lumber at a better price.
Poplar is a lot tougher that pine or fir, machines and sands very nicely, and it still pretty light. And it’s inexpensive.
A very simple way to join the frames is with pocket screws. These are plenty strong for decorative furniture/stuff that you won’t sit or stand on, when used correctly. You can pick up a Kreg jig for under $50: http://www.amazon.com/Kreg-R3-Pocket-Hole-System/dp/B000J43A7W . I use mine all the time.

-- Jesse --

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SalvageCraft

274 posts in 1150 days


#7 posted 1064 days ago

Wow. In the time it took me to respond, 4 other posts!

-- Jesse --

View tyskkvinna's profile

tyskkvinna

1308 posts in 1610 days


#8 posted 1064 days ago

I would also go with Poplar. Pine is great, but for something like this I wouldn’t use it- warping. I like pine for projects that are a little more stable. I think the groove with pocket screws is just fine. If you see the grooves (which I think are the way to go) you could always take a piece of scrap wood and trim it to fit on the table saw- just a little sliver- and insert it into the groove where you’d see it. Or wood putty. I love wood putty…... It sounds like you’re going to paint it anyway.

-- Lis - Michigan - http://www.missmooseart.com - https://www.etsy.com/people/lisbokt

View pjones46's profile

pjones46

209 posts in 1267 days


#9 posted 1064 days ago

FYI
Specific Gravity of different woods:

Eastern White Pine .34 (green), .37 (dry)
Poplar .40 (green), .42 (dry)
Western Red cedar .31 (green), .34 (dry)
Soft Maple .44 (green), .47 (dry)

Poplar is usually cheaper than pine for FAS, atleast from my suppliers, and it is clearer and accepts paint very well and is easy to machine.

-- God is great, the Beer is good and people are Crazy. www.pauljoneswoodworks.com

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MrRon

2788 posts in 1868 days


#10 posted 1064 days ago

I have used “Radiata” pine from HD with good results.

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

15582 posts in 1491 days


#11 posted 1064 days ago

We have made some inexpensive panel doors just like pjones above described and they worked great. The wood that we used was poplar.

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View Cloves's profile

Cloves

5 posts in 1065 days


#12 posted 1063 days ago

Hi guys, thanks for all the replies. I figured I would get some good advice on here.

Ok, the panels I went with are pine. They are 3” x 1” x 8’. I went to HD and it was the cheapest and lightest wood i could find in stock. They rang up at $4.31 a pop. I looked for poplar but couldn’t find anything. The other stuff they had was composite, azek, and all the over priced linear foot wood.

Those are some really sweet looking joints! I have most of the wood tools now, miter saw, table saw, and a router with some bits. I am a bit under a tight deadline, so after talking to my neighbor and him telling me to use his biscuit joiner to connect the wood. He mentioned to just do a butt end, but I want this to look nice, so I went with a 45 degree miter.

Today I cut all the wood and the miters. I also purchased a 1/8×3/8 router bit to dig the channels for the panels into the wood. I am almost 100% that biscuit joints and glue are no where as strong as the Mortise and Tenon Joints as pointed to above. But being that I am up against the wall here, should I go ahead and use the biscuit joiner tomorrow (using #0 biscuit) and then glue and join the corners? Or should I use my air gun and somehow staple the ends? Not sure what type of staples to get to use with the finishing gun.

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pjones46

209 posts in 1267 days


#13 posted 1063 days ago

How about after gluing them together with biscuits and letting them dry, drill and use dowels with glue in each of the corners to give you a tenon like effect. Simple fast and relatively easy to do.

-- God is great, the Beer is good and people are Crazy. www.pauljoneswoodworks.com

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Cloves

5 posts in 1065 days


#14 posted 1063 days ago

Wouldn’t the dowel drill into the biscuit?

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pjones46

209 posts in 1267 days


#15 posted 1063 days ago

Yes, however, the dowel will be the strenght in the joint where the biscuit was more for alignment.

-- God is great, the Beer is good and people are Crazy. www.pauljoneswoodworks.com

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