LumberJocks

What is the use of a skew bench chisel?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by TopamaxSurvivor posted 09-19-2011 06:26 AM 2158 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17656 posts in 3137 days


09-19-2011 06:26 AM

Topic tags/keywords: skew bench chisel purpose

Reading a review of Narex skew bench chisel made me wonder where a skew chisel excells over a straight chisel?

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence


10 replies so far

View Brett's profile

Brett

937 posts in 2221 days


#1 posted 09-19-2011 07:01 AM

It is good for cleaning out material in tight corners or spaces, such as dovetails, or any corner/inside angle where a straight chisel won’t reach. There may be more but that is what I would use it for.

Here is a good example in this picture

-- Hand Crafted by Brett Peterson John 3:16 http://www.TheCrookedNail.blogspot.com

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 2577 days


#2 posted 09-19-2011 08:01 AM

some even have long parring scewcheisels as well as cranked parrings cheisel
that can clean those points that is so difficult to reach

Dennis

View ChrisCrafts's profile

ChrisCrafts

107 posts in 2046 days


#3 posted 09-19-2011 08:12 AM

It’s for when you Skew up your project. Ba da ba!

-- Chris, Washington The State! http://www.chris-crafts.com

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17656 posts in 3137 days


#4 posted 09-19-2011 08:56 AM

I’d better get one of each size; small, medium and large. That should cover all the projects I skew up ;-))

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View mafe's profile

mafe

11140 posts in 2551 days


#5 posted 09-19-2011 11:49 AM

Hi Topa,

The skewed blade makes you able to make a sliding movement through the cut.
When your cut normally you hit the surface with the full width of the chisel at once and push throught the fibers. With the skewed you hit the cut with the skewed angle and then slice your way through.
This is especially super effective on endgrain. When you use it bevel down you also increase the angle of attac compared to how you hold it.

They can also be used for cleaning out dovetails and other, but for that purpose I would buy a fishtail chisel instead.

I made a set my self of old chisels you can see here:
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/45520

The beauty of the skews is that they can be used in applications (apart from d/t sockets) where a normal straight ground chisel may cause significant tear out. F’rinstance, I use them a lot to shape the ends of exposed tenons before smoothing and rounding…the slicing cut doesn’t tear the grain whereas a cut with a standard LN chisel might – Rob

http://investigationsblog.wordpress.com/2010/06/07/plane-skew-angles/

Ok that should be enough.
Good luck,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 3761 days


#6 posted 09-19-2011 01:29 PM

I not sure which came first, the Guillotine, or the skew chisel.

The French must have been pretty smart to have used this in their design.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View jim C's profile

jim C

1467 posts in 2560 days


#7 posted 09-19-2011 01:41 PM

To skew or not to skew…......that is the question!
The French skew up everything they touch.

-- When I was a boy, I was told "anyone can be President", now I'm beginning to believe it!

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17656 posts in 3137 days


#8 posted 09-19-2011 06:32 PM

Thanks Mads. I can’t believe I missed that post of yours. I guess I will discover the advantages of skews as I get into higher quality WW.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4450 posts in 3422 days


#9 posted 09-19-2011 07:10 PM

Scews work the same as using a smoothing plane at an angle. Easier to pare the wood.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View mafe's profile

mafe

11140 posts in 2551 days


#10 posted 09-19-2011 08:08 PM

I still just fool arround, but discover a lot as I do.
But I have a French grirlfriend so I might be all skewed…
Big smile,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com