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another question (cutting boards)

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Forum topic by sgtq posted 1038 days ago 781 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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sgtq

363 posts in 1272 days


1038 days ago

Ok so I have another question, do you run your cutting boards through a planer at all after glue up or does everyone just sand them down? My question arises from my planing disaster this morning, I tried to plane my cutting board glue up with a Ryobi Hand held portable planer and ended up with a bunch of uneven passes and no idea how to fix it, basically I’ve ruined the board and wonder if I should have just sanded it all down to even. Any help is appreciated. (I dont own and cant afford a 12 inch planer right now so thats out of the question :) Thanks in advance.

-- There is nothing wrong with America that cannot be cured by what is right with America. ~William J. Clinton


5 replies so far

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SASmith

1543 posts in 1583 days


#1 posted 1038 days ago

Do you have a router? You could make a simple router planer.
Here is a big one I made: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/40093

Here is a good blog on the subject: http://lumberjocks.com/TZH/blog/series/3258

-- Scott Smith, Southern Illinois

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ShaneA

5242 posts in 1194 days


#2 posted 1038 days ago

Better sand even with a belt sander then random orbit or hand sand. You could use a handheld non power plane. Router jig will work as well. Planing them in planers can be done, but it is dicey and seems like it is hard on the planer.

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Jonathan

2603 posts in 1646 days


#3 posted 1038 days ago

The first end grain board that I made, I used a small handheld belt sander to flatten out. It took a long time and lots of patience, but it worked pretty well.

I’d also vote for the router idea posted above. Although I haven’t tried it, if I had not gotten a drum sander, I would’ve tried the router plane on the next board I made. As long as your guides are flat and sturdy, this should produce excellent results in a short amount of time, without the frustrations that can arise from using a belt sander. Besides, then you’ll have the router plane for future projects of a similar nature.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

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rance

4125 posts in 1756 days


#4 posted 1038 days ago

If you route it, do a first pass around the edge as a climb cut to prevent tearout.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

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Jonathan

2603 posts in 1646 days


#5 posted 1038 days ago

Rance, that is excellent advice.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

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