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Forum topic by mpmitche posted 1077 days ago 758 views 0 times favorited 3 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mpmitche

405 posts in 1609 days


1077 days ago

In my shop I use a large rip saw and a smaller crosscut saw for breaking down stock and then a sash, carcass, and dovetail saw for joinery. My question to the crowd is what would the continental saw collection for these jobs look like typically? With interchangable blades would they just have one do all saw or would there be several identical with different blades or many speciallized saws? If anyone knows how it’s done over there I’d love to hear about it.

Thanks

-- Mike, Western New York


3 replies so far

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mafe

9492 posts in 1722 days


#1 posted 1076 days ago

Hi Mike,
This link has some good explanations and also the newest types of blades for our treditional frame saws.
http://www.fine-tools.com/gestell.htm

For resawing some like the type with the blade centered:
http://hyperkitten.com/woodworking/resaw.php

Hope this can be usefull, pls feel free to ask,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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mpmitche

405 posts in 1609 days


#2 posted 1074 days ago

Thanks Mads, those two links help a lot. I also found a the Village Carpenter had a blog on building the resawing type of frame saw too. I’ve been reading the Roy Underhill books latley which got me interested in trying some frame saws. Have you ever used the type where the blade is fixed in the frame (assume this is xcut or joineryt only) instead of having the freedom to pivot? I’m curious if those are just bucking saws or is there any benefit in other saws to that style?

-- Mike, Western New York

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mafe

9492 posts in 1722 days


#3 posted 1073 days ago

I have three types you can see them on the links.
The one with the blade fixed in the frame are easier to make but yes it can be a weak point and you will have no way to turn, but it can also give a stiffness to the blade and support it so it is really a matter of the use.

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/53449
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/53076
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/46219

Smiles,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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