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Forum topic by crank49 posted 1042 days ago 825 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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crank49

3333 posts in 1566 days


1042 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: resource tip beginner mobile

I recently saw a list of the top 10 hand tools for woodworking and I was initially really surprised at the items listed. Then, after more thought, I started to see the logic of most items being there. Still, I think a couple of omissions can’t be ignored, like there was no saw on the list. I decided to correct this and make a woodworker’s list, minimal but complete, without limiting it to just 10 items and without limiting it to just hand tools. Nothing big and stationary included, but a few corded and/or battery powered tools need to be here. This would be the kit I would grab to go a friends house to build some shelves in their utility room, for instance.

I have seen several threads on this site asking what tools are needed to start out in woodworking and this list could be a good start.

If anyone else would like to refine this further, feel free, but remember this is a beginner’s list of essentials. Don’t need a Sawstop or a LN jointer plane in this kit.

I think this list, if it’s done properly, could be a good check list for any woodworker to put together a kit of essentials to take with you when you need to work away from the shop as well as a list of items needed to get started in woodworking.

So, here’s my list to get started.

1. Layout or Speed Square
2. Sliding Bevel Guage
3. 25 ft. Tape Measure
4. Levels, a 6”-9” torpedo & 24”-36”
5. Utility Knife
6. Chisels, ¼”, ½”, ¾”, 1”
7. Planes, a Block and a Jack
8. Claw Hammer
9. Nail Sets
10. Screw Drivers, 3/16” and 1/4” flat and #1, #2 Phillips
11. Japanese type Pull Saw or Shorty Toolbox type Hand Saw.
12. Circular Saw, w/combination blade
13. Jig saw, w/assorted blades
14. ½” Drill, w/ brad point and split point bits.
15. Pencils
16. Chalk Line
17. Saw Horses or Work Stand

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H


10 replies so far

View Gregn's profile

Gregn

1642 posts in 1578 days


#1 posted 1042 days ago

For getting started or to take off site this list does cover the majority of what would be needed. I only thing that I might add would be a compass for layout and scribing a edge line.

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

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sandhill

2102 posts in 2519 days


#2 posted 1042 days ago

I agree.

-- Bob Egbert AKA Sandhill http://www.sandhillwoodworks.com/

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5377 posts in 1827 days


#3 posted 1042 days ago

Pretty good list, I honestly differ on opinion on a couple of items, just because I find certain items more useful for the way I work than others, so if you don’t mind i am going to refine your list a touch here…

1. QUALITY Combination Square. Don’t bother with the ultra cheapies, however I have found the Johnson combintation squares at Home Depot to be accurate…
2. Sliding Bevel Guage
3. 25 ft. Tape Measure
4. Levels, a 6”-9” torpedo & 24”-36”. Are we building furniture or a building? For most furniture construction a large level is a moot point. HOWEVER for things like cabinet installations etc… a good level is a must have.
5. Utility Knives. I always keep several of them on hand.
6. Chisels, ¼”, ½”, ¾”, 1”
7. Planes, a Block and a Jack
8. Claw Hammer
9. Nail Sets
10. Screw Drivers set, with at least 3/16” and 1/4” flat and #1, #2 Phillips. You may / will also want changeable bit drivers that can handle square drive screws, torx and other specialty fasteners.
11. Japanese type Pull Saw, and Japanese type pull trim saw.
12. Circular Saw, w/combination blade
13. Jig saw, w/assorted blades
14. 3/8” Drill, w/ brad point and split point, spade, driver etc… bits.
15. Pencils
16. cutting guide / straight edge and clamps
17. Saw Horses or Work Stand
18. Did I mention clamps?
19. More clamps.
20. I don’t recall… Did I mention clamps?

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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crank49

3333 posts in 1566 days


#4 posted 1042 days ago

1. Layout or Speed Square or Quality Combination Square
2. Sliding Bevel Guage
3. 25 ft. Tape Measure
4. Levels, a 6”-9” torpedo & 24”-36”
5. Utility Knife
6. Chisels, ¼”, ½”, ¾”, 1”
7. Planes, a Block and a Jack
8. Claw Hammer
9. Nail Sets
10. Screw Drivers, 3/16” and 1/4” flat and #1, #2 Phillips, + other useful bits as needed, torx, square, etc.
11. Japanese type Pull Saw or Shorty Toolbox type Hand Saw.
12. Circular Saw, w/combination blade
13. Jig saw, w/assorted blades
14. 3/8” or 1/2” Drill (to suit your style), w/ brad point and split point bits.
15. Pencils
16. Chalk Line
17. Saw Horses or Work Stand
18. Compass
19. Clamps

Anything here over kill? Is the kit too big?

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9552 posts in 1213 days


#5 posted 1042 days ago

I think all of those things are pretty essential to a balanced kit, so there’s nothing I’d take away. Borderline tool would be the jigsaw, but when you need it, nothing else will do short of a keyhole saw and that’s not realistic.

I would suggest that while a 25’ tape measure is something I wouldn’t do without, I also wouldn’t want to do inside measures or work in corners without a stick / lufkin / zig zag inside 72” rule. Too much variation when hookiing vs. butting a tape measure end to stock.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

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patron

12952 posts in 1936 days


#6 posted 1042 days ago

rasp
vacuum
(cleaning others houses is a must
if you make a mess)
for cab work
a good framing square

pliers
adjustable wrench
an electrical tester
extension cord

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View PutnamEco's profile

PutnamEco

155 posts in 1881 days


#7 posted 1042 days ago

I would ad a coping saw, some kind of putty knife, my preference would be a 5 in 1 painters tool but a 1” flexi would work as well, pliers both needle nose and water pump, maybe linesmen as well. vice grips, adjustable wrench, socket set, allen keys/hex bits, scratch awl, scissors, caulking gun, stapler,

-- “The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.” ― Franklin D. Roosevelt

View crank49's profile

crank49

3333 posts in 1566 days


#8 posted 1042 days ago

Thanks everyone. There are some good points here; I hadn’t really thought about mechanical tools but yes, you do need a basic few things to maintain your woodworking tools if nothing else.

And David, good call on the shop vac and all.

I’l rework this and repost later.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

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crank49

3333 posts in 1566 days


#9 posted 1041 days ago

Okay, I’m back with a new list of essentials / road kit / starter set of tools for woodworking.

I’m trying not to deviate too far from my OP in regard to this started as a list of suggested hand tools for woodworking which I tried to make more universal with a few power tools; then decided it would be a good kit for making house calls.

I’m ultimately going to try to put this kit together into a box or bag and post a picture because I think I have spares of most of the things listed and I’d like to have a kit of tools like this to take on away jobs.

Layout and Marking:
1. Speed Square or Quality Combination Square and a Framing Square.
2. Sliding Bevel Guage
3. 25 ft. Tape Measure and a 6 ft. folding rule
4. Compass (for marking arcs, not finding directions).
5. Levels, a 6”-9” torpedo & 24”-36” (long one can serve as straight edge.)
6. Pencils
7. Chalk Line
8. Utility Knife (could have been in all three lists, but I’ll put it here)

Cutting, Drilling, Fastening:
9. Chisels, ¼”, ½”, ¾”, 1”
10. Planes, a Block and a Jack
11. Claw Hammer
12. Nail Sets
13. Screw Drivers, 3/16” and 1/4” flat and #1, #2 Phillips
14. Driver set, 1/4” hex drives for allen, torx, square bits and hex sockets, etc.
15. Japanese type Pull Saw or Shorty Toolbox type Hand Saw and a Trim Saw.
16. Circular Saw, w/combination blade
17. Jig saw, w/assorted blades
18. 3/8” or 1/2” Drill / driver, w/ brad point & spade bits & HSS split point drill bits.

Work Holding and Mechanical Tools and Accessories:
19. Saw Horses or Work Stand
20. Clamps
21. 8” wide range adjustable wrench.
22. Vise grips, needle nose and channel lock type pliers and diagonal cutters.
23. Putty knife, or 5-n-1 painter’s tool.
24. Vacuum and extension cord.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View PutnamEco's profile

PutnamEco

155 posts in 1881 days


#10 posted 1040 days ago

Totally forgot about another tool I use commonly , a pry bar. There are three in my toolbox that I use very regularly.
First up would be a Wonder Bar, for my heavier prying, like extracting window frames and light demo. Second would be my Shark bar, one of their smaller 8” ones, with a cats paw on one side and a flat on the other. It is very useful for trim work. Third would be a real cats paw nail puller. I hardly ever use this tool ;-) but on rare occasions, when a reluctant nail does need to be removed.
If I had to choose only one, it would be a larger sized Shark bar. I would have a hard time without my Wonder Bar though.

Re:crank49 says:
22. Vise grips, needle nose and channel lock type pliers and diagonal cutters.

Linesman pliers have worthy wire cutters incorporated into their design, with the added benefit of a beefy gripping surface attached to some sturdy hand grips.
End knippers would also serve a dual purpose, wire cutting and nail extraction.

-- “The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.” ― Franklin D. Roosevelt

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