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Dust Collection Layout - Need Assistance

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Forum topic by Fuzzybearz posted 12-05-2018 06:51 AM 1105 views 1 time favorited 35 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Fuzzybearz

44 posts in 271 days


12-05-2018 06:51 AM

So, I need to know peoples opinions on whether I should go with one route, or split off my circuit into a T early on.

First off, I have a 3 HP PM 075 going through 8” ducting and splitting off into 6” then down to 4” at the machine. The drawing is not to scale and the 90 degrees aren’t as sharp as you will see in the actual picture. I need to know if I should continue that 6” piping going through the center of my garage to the other side and place some vents there, or, if I should split it off right where the 8” pipe comes in through the garage. This proposal is in dotted lines as Yellow and Red.

Sorry for the mess.


35 replies so far

View fly2low's profile

fly2low

54 posts in 299 days


#1 posted 12-05-2018 08:45 AM

When I laid mine out I have three runs
When I needed to make a 90 turn, I used two 45s
I went 6 inch to all the machines, with a 6 inch port to my planer and to my jointer, a 4 and a 5 to the table saw, two fours to my band saw and router table

I had to change the ports on all the machines to get the air flow I wanted. Stepping down to 4 really restricts flow

-- Rich Gig Harbor, WA

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MJCD

580 posts in 2573 days


#2 posted 12-07-2018 01:37 AM

Adding to what fly2low says:
- Use 2 45s rather than 90s at every opportunity;
- A 6” opening has ((6^2) / (4^2)) = 36 / 16 = 225% more CFM capability. Extend the 8” wherever possible, converting to 6” to the machines, use a 4” by 6” connector at the machine. The 8” yields (8^2) / (6^2) = 64 / 36 or 77% additional CFM than the 6”.
- Do not put a bend or a diverter near the input to the DC – it’s best to let the air entering the DC to come in as straight as possible. Having said this, put a 2×45 degree diverter mid-run to get to the middle machine, if you have the ceiling space to do it.
- Install more ‘drop’ connectors (essentially, 90s (2×45)) mid-run for future access, and cap them off for now. This is the time to plan for additional connections.

In general, you have relatively short draws (the length of the runs), and maximizing duct diameter will give you plenty of suction.

MJCD

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TungOil

1059 posts in 697 days


#3 posted 12-07-2018 02:04 AM

Start here: https://airhand.com/designing/

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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fly2low

54 posts in 299 days


#4 posted 12-07-2018 02:15 AM

air handling is where I got my bellmouth collars and 5 inch pipe. Most of my piping is PVC, but 5 inch PVC can be found right next to the unicorn

-- Rich Gig Harbor, WA

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fly2low

54 posts in 299 days


#5 posted 12-07-2018 02:16 AM

The straight pipe into the DC should be about 48 inches – but sometimes hard to lay out. It dictated where my DC ended up in my shop

-- Rich Gig Harbor, WA

View WoodES's profile

WoodES

130 posts in 1893 days


#6 posted 12-07-2018 04:03 AM

Another vote for eliminating the 6” ductwork.

Assuming you are planning a single user shop, I would recommend you use the 8” pipe through the entire system and not step down to the 6”size. DC systems differ from HVAC forced air systems as the forced air system is a single input source to many outlets simultaneously. Home shop DC systems are a single input (e.g. tool) to a single outlet at the DC. Thus, there is no reason to step the system. Keep the large duct work until you get to the tools and then step down using the hose.

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Holbs

2008 posts in 2231 days


#7 posted 12-07-2018 04:40 AM

Can your 3 HP machine handle 8” ducting? Thought that was the realm of 5+ HP dust collection systems.
Is it possible to go simply diagonally across the shop instead of along the walls? I did the same layout when I did my 6” ducting. Have since converted to cutting straight across middle of shop instead.
At the end of your run, that would be around 30’ of length. Kind of far. If went diagonally, would drop down to low 20 foot range.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

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fly2low

54 posts in 299 days


#8 posted 12-07-2018 04:51 AM

Holbs brings up a good point. You probably will not be able to generate enough airflow with 3 hp in 8 inch ducts to prevent the dust and debris from layering out in the 8 inch duct. Might stick with 6 inch

-- Rich Gig Harbor, WA

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5177 posts in 2695 days


#9 posted 12-07-2018 11:39 AM

I’ll echo the comments about the 8”, especially so if the incoming air is through a 4” duct. I’m thinking you’ll have clogs.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View MikeDilday's profile

MikeDilday

79 posts in 661 days


#10 posted 12-07-2018 01:54 PM

Red for sure if it were me. Shorter is better.

-- Michael Dilday, Suffolk, Va.

View Fuzzybearz's profile

Fuzzybearz

44 posts in 271 days


#11 posted 12-09-2018 02:31 AM

I believe I am right on the edge of 8” being too larger of diameter. The weird thing about my setup is my cyclone port is 6” so essential in one flow I am going DC 6” to 8” piping to 10” splitter) to to 6” piping to 5” piping down to 4” at the machine.

Not quite sure how the ups and downs will play out. Probably terribly, but I bought this tubing off of a guy who used the same 8” piping for his woodshop and he had longer runs. This is also the reason why you see me using a hodgepodge of different sizes. Definitely lesson learned.

As for the “Diagonal” comment. Yes. I planned this whole thing out terribly and it is costing me alot of time and money. But there is no way im going back to redo things unless this doesnt work. Im getting the motor rewired hopefully Ill get it up and running this weekend. Ill provide CFMss and a better picture of my shop.

Onto another thread, making sure I wired my things correctly

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MikeDilday

79 posts in 661 days


#12 posted 12-09-2018 03:42 AM

If all of your machines are 4” or less I would not use 8” in the mains. You need more airflow for verticals so I would go 6” in the mains and 4” in each vertical drop. You need a short 4” horizontal in each drop to prevent clogs. Going 4” from the machine into an 8” pipe will possibly cause clogs. In the photos you can see how I did the 6” mains, 6×6x4 y our horizontal to a 4” 90 for the drop. Some of my dedicated horizontal runs to one machine are 4”. Go ahead and reduce to 4” as soon as you leave a main going to a single machine.

-- Michael Dilday, Suffolk, Va.

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Fuzzybearz

44 posts in 271 days


#13 posted 12-09-2018 03:50 AM

Mike, Did you ever get a measure of your CFM? and how many HP is your DC? I really want my DC up and running to see the real world test.

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MikeDilday

79 posts in 661 days


#14 posted 12-09-2018 04:28 AM

I never measured my CFM but it seems to be sufficient. I used Bill Pence’s spreadsheet to calculate my flow to get everything calculated. My DC is a 3 hp.

-- Michael Dilday, Suffolk, Va.

View WoodES's profile

WoodES

130 posts in 1893 days


#15 posted 12-09-2018 05:01 AM

Fuzzy, Your cyclone has a 6” inlet port and outfeeds to the DC. What is the diameter of the DC port?

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