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chipping while ripping 2x4s with new 24T Freud blade

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Forum topic by Spikes posted 11-21-2018 05:06 AM 1357 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Spikes

97 posts in 249 days


11-21-2018 05:06 AM

Hi,

I got a new 24T freud blade and ripping has never been easier, love it. Plus it leaves a really clean edge, all the saw marks I was experiencing with the stock blade are gone. However quite often I get chipping and I don’t understand why since the blade is otherwise performing so good. Here’s a pic of a small 2×4 section just cut:

Also I don’t have a pic of it, but another thing that happens a lot is when I get to the very end of the cut the top corner on the good part will splinter off and be left attached to the waste side.

any thoughts why those two things are happening?

thanks,

-- Don't worry about making progress, worry about practicing. If you practice you will make progress even if you don't want to.


12 replies so far

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10756 posts in 1690 days


#1 posted 11-21-2018 06:20 AM

Looks kinda like it’s delaminating along the grain somewhat.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

880 posts in 1423 days


#2 posted 11-21-2018 01:05 PM

if the splinters are on top, raise the blade higher so the teeth are coming down into the wood.if the splinters are on bottom you may need a better ZCI.

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1193 posts in 3054 days


#3 posted 11-21-2018 01:44 PM

For the end cut top corner
> Use good outfeed support
> Use two good push sticks to control both pieces
>And ALWAYS prep stock longer than final length so that you can cut off what Mother Nature gives you in the wood

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

3174 posts in 1685 days


#4 posted 11-21-2018 02:17 PM

That little piece remaining on the offcut is common.

Using a push block (not stick) that pushes both pieces through the blade will eliminate that issue. The heel of the push block acts as a zero clearance insert and eliminates the tear out. Resist the temptation to push the waste piece through with your hand.

As far as the splintering, that can happen with certain types of wood and/or grain direction. But you should be getting a pretty clean cut regardless so long as the blade is sharp and the saw adjusted properly.

You want’ about .003” more clearance between fence and blade on the outfeed (far side) of the blade. Otherwise the teeth rotating upward can do that. Adjust the fence to do this.

Also be sure your blade is above the wood to the level of the gullet.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View GrantA's profile

GrantA

751 posts in 1612 days


#5 posted 11-21-2018 02:35 PM

Don’t adjust your fence to be crooked as suggested above..003 right at the back of the blade would put the front of the fence about.009 to the left of the blade. No bueno.
Push blocks, outfeed support and proper blade height are key.
From that picture it looks like you’re running 2×4s on edge through the tablesaw, am I right? If so you’re probably at the max blade height and that may be as good as it gets.

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1193 posts in 3054 days


#6 posted 11-21-2018 02:51 PM



Using a push block (not stick) that pushes both pieces through the blade will eliminate that issue.

You want about .003” more clearance between fence and blade on the outfeed (far side) of the blade. Otherwise the teeth rotating upward can do that. Adjust the fence to do this.

- rwe2156

I suppose blocks vs. sticks is a personal issue, when I’m ripping thin stock I’ll use a hefty type of push block and sacrifice the heel of the block to make the cut. Something like 2×4 or a larger piece of stock that I can easily control I use two separate sticks and push the stock past the blade onto the outfeed. Either way I have plenty of both, and when I pull the last one out of the bucket, I find some more scrap pieces to trace out the shape and make some new ones on the band saw. I NEVER risk getting my most prized tools close to the blade!!!

I’ve got my fence 100% dead nuts square to the slots & blade, never had an issue.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

424 posts in 1307 days


#7 posted 11-21-2018 09:15 PM

I am assuming that what your picture is showing is the top edge of the cut at the top of the photo. If so, it rather looks like your saw teeth are falling below the top of the workpiece just a small amount at the end of the cut. This would leave a small sliver of wood that will break away as the cut is completed. I can only think that either the workpiece is slightly thicker at that point and your blade is not high enough (see Tomsteve’s comment above) or maybe your outfeed table or support is not quite level with the saw table allowing the opposite end to drop down thus raising the finishing end of the cut. As Tomsteve said, raise the blade some (usually the teeth should be exposed to the level of the gullets). Also, use a long straight edge and make sure your outfeed table or support is level with the saw table. One more suggestion: use a feather board to hold your workpiece against the fence.

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

301 posts in 115 days


#8 posted 11-21-2018 09:23 PM

Another good reason for a higher count tooth blade. I use the 80 and 84 tooth blades on my 10” & 12” saws. I know most like using the lower tooth count blades, but I like the smoother cut & less chip out

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5094 posts in 2555 days


#9 posted 11-21-2018 09:31 PM

I use the 80 and 84 tooth blades on my 10” & 12” saws.

Not for ripping 3 1/2” stock, I hope.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12431 posts in 2584 days


#10 posted 11-21-2018 09:47 PM



if the splinters are on top, raise the blade higher so the teeth are coming down into the wood.if the splinters are on bottom you may need a better ZCI.
- tomsteve

+1

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Spikes's profile

Spikes

97 posts in 249 days


#11 posted 11-23-2018 05:12 AM

thanks all, I think you nailed it, specifically I was keeping the blade too low (I guess I erroneously thought the lower the better in terms of stability, as long as it cleared the wood) and the outfeed table is not leveled. I also don’t have a ZCI yet, but I’m not sure how it matters here since the issue is with the top of the 2×4 (thought I mentioned, but clearly I did not, only that it was a 2by). I’ll do some more experiments this weekend, but it definitely makes a lot of sense.

One thing I’m not clear about tho, it seems there was a suggestion to also be pushing the waste (I use two push sticks) to avoid the corner splintering problem. However I was under the impression that in normal table saw usage the waste was generally left alone, using one push stick at the front to keep the piece down and against the fence and the other at the back for pushing it. With a push block I can see how I can use the sacrificial rear-edge as a sort of zero-clearance, but I’m generally more comfortable with sticks as I feel I can cover more surface.

thanks,

-- Don't worry about making progress, worry about practicing. If you practice you will make progress even if you don't want to.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12431 posts in 2584 days


#12 posted 11-23-2018 06:03 AM

Most of the time I don’t push the waste except when using a Gripper or wide push block. I think it helps keep the cut cleaner on the waste side for when that matters. Most of the time I don’t worry about it except when the waste piece is almost exactly the right size for something else.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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