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Short table - Need help with design

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Forum topic by Pyro posted 11-20-2018 11:05 PM 381 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Pyro

52 posts in 359 days


11-20-2018 11:05 PM

Hey guys,

First off thank you for all of your help, you guys are a big part of why I haven’t given up on making things better than I did before.

So for Christmas my wife is asking me to make a short table to hold some pictures and candles using wood taken from an old family property that is no longer. I don’t really understand the table’s purpose to be honest but it seems important to her so what the hell. I could slap something together but I’ve heard that most furniture made with fasteners doesn’t really last and I’d like to improve the way I do things. Anyways, here’s what she wants:

Dimensions

Talked with her for a bit and here’s what we came up with:

4 ft wide
17 in high
19 in deep
5.5 inches beneath the tabletop she wants a “shelf” with a closed back.

She really likes this simple rustic style except she’d rather not have a trestle so it’s easier for her to clean underneath the table. I’m thinking that the table being so short, maybe that shelf could act as a trestle?

Materials

The wood I salvaged is in rough condition but appears usable. I took a couple photos. Is it just SPF? Here’s what I got:

4 pieces @ 6 ft
1 piece 33 inches
1 piece 4 ft

True dimensions 1.5” x 7”

So I was thinking if I took 3 of those 6 footers and cut them down to 4 ft I could make a tabletop. Cutting those 3 pieces would leave me with 3 additional 2 ft pieces. Those 2 footers plus maybe that 33” piece could be the four legs of the table. Since she likes that big heavy look, I could rip them in half and double them up so they’re 3×3.5 or something.

Questions

What do you guys think about that wood? Yay or nay? How should I clean it up so I don’t ruin anyone’s blades? Belt sander and then into a planer/jointer?

How would you recommend a beginner build something like this so that it isn’t overly complicated but so that it’s still around many years from now?

Thanks guys, you’ve been such a big help to me.


8 replies so far

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1171 posts in 3047 days


#1 posted 11-21-2018 02:41 PM

Pyro,
Depending on how dirty the wood is you can wire brush it or sand. If it’s just weathered and does not have sand or dirt all over it i’d go to the jointer then the planer, table saw etc etc. standard stock preparation. For your design, scale is important, you’re essentially building a hall way table, like this one or this one but shorter. See pics below just a quick Sketchup build, (really great tool to learn to use), all dimensions will depend on what the dimensions of your stock is after milling, but for the sake of the first draw, it fits your dimensions with a 1” top 3/4” shelf, and 1.5” square straight legs. Apron is 3/4” by 1.5” tall and M&T into legs. Good Luck!

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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Pyro

52 posts in 359 days


#2 posted 11-21-2018 09:48 PM

Thanks Chef,

How is the top affixed to the frame? Appreciate it

View jutsFL's profile

jutsFL

85 posts in 39 days


#3 posted 11-22-2018 12:42 AM

Personally, I prefer Z clips for the apron to table tops.

Check out youtube for a quick approach. Not much to them really. Very sturdy securement, and allows the top to move with humidity changes.

-- I've quickly learned that being a woodworker isn't about making flawless work, rather it's fixing all the mistakes you made so that it appears flawless to others! Jay - FL

View Rich's profile

Rich

3873 posts in 787 days


#4 posted 11-22-2018 01:22 AM


Personally, I prefer Z clips for the apron to table tops.

Check out youtube for a quick approach. Not much to them really. Very sturdy securement, and allows the top to move with humidity changes.

- jutsFL

+1. A biscuit joiner makes quick work of cutting the slots in the aprons.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1869 posts in 1996 days


#5 posted 11-22-2018 04:36 AM

That looks like something Bandit makes. Very rustic.

-- Aj

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1171 posts in 3047 days


#6 posted 11-22-2018 12:37 PM



Thanks Chef,
How is the top affixed to the frame? Appreciate it
- Pyro

There are lots of options, I’ve used figure 8’s, shopmade wooden clips, and the Z clips. For the cost vs. time, the Z clips are really slick if you’ve got a biscuit joiner. You just set the depth of the slot to match the height of the Z clip and you can cut the slots during dry fit. If no Biscuit Joiner you just run a saw kerf at the right height, before putting the legs & apron together.

For legs to aprons, I used biscuits in the first table i linked above and then for the other table linked, 1 used a 3/8 spiral bit on the router table to cut a slot from the top of the leg to about 1/2” short of the total width if the apron, and then matched the tenon to the slot, which was much simpler for assembly, the biscuit build was my very first piece of what I’d call furniture. If it was a larger table that would be geting heavier use I would have just dropped over the bit for a traditional M&T joint for more strength.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5086 posts in 2549 days


#7 posted 11-22-2018 04:56 PM

If you don’t have a biscuit joiner like me, it is still easy to cut the slots for z clips on a router table if you remember to do it before you assemble the apron. I use a 3 wing slot cutter.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Rich's profile

Rich

3873 posts in 787 days


#8 posted 11-22-2018 07:24 PM

I make the kerf for the Z-clip about 1/32” to 3/64” higher than the height of the clip. That way the table top is pulled down tight.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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