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Help with burning 1/4 sawn white oak

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Forum topic by cso posted 09-04-2011 08:41 PM 1544 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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cso

78 posts in 2150 days


09-04-2011 08:41 PM

Hello, I was wondering if anybody had any tips on this. I am cutting bevels at 27.5 degrees and when I rip the boards, I’m not getting burns. However, when I crosscut the same bevel (almost like a raised panel look) I get burn marks. I’m using a tenoning jig for the cross cuts and I double checked that my blade is parallel to the miter slots. It’s parallel to the fence also, but that’s not the issue. I’m not getting burns when I’m normally crosscutting with the miter gauge at 90 degrees. I have changed feed rates, faster is a little better but still some burns. Thanks.


6 replies so far

View Minorhero's profile

Minorhero

372 posts in 2067 days


#1 posted 09-05-2011 12:16 AM

I get the same as well quite often. Some woods/grains are more prone to it as well. If its an exposed piece then I have found taking a very small cut removing less then the width of your saw blade removes most if not all of the burns.

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Grandpa

3256 posts in 2137 days


#2 posted 09-06-2011 04:41 AM

White oak is hard wood and the right tools need to be used. How many teeth are on that blade and it is really sharp or have your used it for awhile? A rip blade (fewer teeth than a cross cut blade) should be used. If you are using a cross cut blade you will have to slow the feed rate to make it cut and then you get the burning. That is where I would go.

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TopamaxSurvivor

17657 posts in 3137 days


#3 posted 09-06-2011 06:17 AM

Will the premium quality carbide combo blades rip it without burning or should a ripping balde be used?

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Grandpa

3256 posts in 2137 days


#4 posted 09-07-2011 05:36 AM

White oak is hard and the rip blade would probably do a better job on it. a good combo blade might be okay but most of us like to have a 10 inch blade with 60 or 80 teeth and wand to make nice smooth rips with it. It just doesn’t happen. Things start to heat up.

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TopamaxSurvivor

17657 posts in 3137 days


#5 posted 09-07-2011 08:33 AM

I just googled and found this http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2020955/23379/Forrest-WW10206125-Woodworker-II-Rip-Blade-Alt-Top-Raker-10-x-20-Tooth-ATB-125.aspx Is something that what most guys use when they have a lot of hardwood to rip? I’m an old softie;-)) Haven’t used much hardwood.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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cso

78 posts in 2150 days


#6 posted 09-07-2011 12:25 PM

Thanks for all of the suggestions. I will try them this weekend. I am using a Freud LU88 thin kerf crosscut blade only used weekends and is about 8-9 months old. Cuts great and clean all around except in this case. I have a rip blade I’ll try. Thanks again, I’ll keep you posted what works.

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