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Which hand tools for tool boxes?

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Forum topic by KayBee posted 1091 days ago 1246 views 1 time favorited 39 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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KayBee

1003 posts in 1880 days


1091 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: wrenches screwdrivers sockets toolbox

I’m getting ready to start my Christmas projects. I’ve decided to do a variation on one I got years (okay decades)ago for my girls. I’m going to make them some tool boxes and fill them with tools. That way they have them when they need them. My mom gave me the something similar when I turned 18. It was a total surprise and still one of my favorite gifts. She said that “every lady needs to be able to fix things or hang pictures.”

So, some wrenches, socket set, screwdriver, hammer and an inexpensive drill. Most likely craftsman(if they have a good sale), cobalt or husky brands.

What am I forgetting? And any other suggestions are most welcome.

-- Karen - a little bit of stupid goes a long way


39 replies so far

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WayneC

12265 posts in 2732 days


#1 posted 1091 days ago

Some small assortments of hardware (screws, nails, etc.) Nail set, pliers, channel locks, cresent wrench, small level, stud finder….

Oh, Tape measure.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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KayBee

1003 posts in 1880 days


#2 posted 1091 days ago

The hardware is a great idea! Thanks.

-- Karen - a little bit of stupid goes a long way

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WayneC

12265 posts in 2732 days


#3 posted 1091 days ago

Your welcome. I put a set together for my daughter when she went off to college. I really like this little drill/driver set….

http://www.amazon.com/Makita-LCT203W-10-8-Volt-Lithium-Ion-Two-Piece/dp/B001DNMUZG/ref=sr_1_11?ie=UTF8&qid=1315098244&sr=8-11

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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Jim Finn

1658 posts in 1556 days


#4 posted 1091 days ago

in the hardware kit I suggest picture hanging hardware along with hollow wall anchors. (the screw in type)

-- In God We Trust

View docholladay's profile

docholladay

1286 posts in 1693 days


#5 posted 1091 days ago

I am in the process of creating what I refer to as the “Move Out” tool kit for my two sons that I will give to them when they move out “permanently” for the first time (I don’t count the dorm at college where my oldest lives at the moment). I am including the same things you have listed. Basic wrenches, sockets, screwdrivers, hammer, pliers & drill. In addition, I am planning to include some chisels (with strong instructions not to use them for a pry bar), a block plane, coping saw and a tool box sized hand saw. A lot of items could be built with that little tool kit.

Doc

-- Hey, woodworking ain't brain surgery. Just do something and keep trying till you get it. Doc

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1749 days


#6 posted 1091 days ago

I hope they have learned from Mom :-)
yes a set of screwdrivers + a set of torxs-cerwdrivers , pliers , a handsaw .. yes a handsaw .. you never know
square and a ruler , don´t forget a pensel :-) , hammers one small pen and a medium claw, level , Voltmeter
or testpen , the smart electric thing that can find electric wires and plumming/watertubes in the walls

okay the wishlist is long you know all about that yourself :-)

but a deasent handdrill is usualy the first powertool every DIY got and today I presume its a 12-14V
screw/boreing drill that becomes most handy and a set of screwbits and drillbits to it remeber the note to them about there is different drillbits for different materials like brickwalls ,wood , metal ,

as the toolfreaks most of are its hard to ristrict ourself … LOL
but I´m sure you will make a very fine toolbox to them

good luck with it
Dennis

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Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1793 days


#7 posted 1091 days ago

Most people less mechanically inclined will reach for plyers, screwdrivers, hammer, tape measure, and level. Utility knives and a hack saw might be useful as well. Anything else gets too involved…my wife, for example, doesn’t know what to do with wrenches and socket sets.

I’ve given socket sets to guys as a graduation gift simple because they generally have cars and small machines to play around with. If they have no automotive needs, then I’d stick with tools for household use.

Yeah, hopefully you’ve taught them a thing or two!

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

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KayBee

1003 posts in 1880 days


#8 posted 1091 days ago

Somehow, I totally missed cutting tools! (I know, bad woodworker, go time out in the shop for an hour!) Multimeter might come in handy too.

Dennis, you’re right it is hard to narrow this list down to ‘just a few’’ tools.

Between me and their mechanic father, they didn’t stand a chance of not knowing basic ‘toology.’ lol

Jay, a socket set sounds like a great graduation present. Way better than the usual cheap pen set.

-- Karen - a little bit of stupid goes a long way

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Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1749 days


#9 posted 1091 days ago

if they are that good with tools then consider cheisels and a few plane´s as Doc say :-)
and just to avoid disastre with the cheisel throw in a small/medium pry bars wih instructions … LOL

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14726 posts in 2310 days


#10 posted 1091 days ago

I would include a combination screwdriver with a lot of tips like trox, Lionel Robins as well as slotted and Phillips. I would disagree on the Makita driver. If it is very seldom used, it is a waste of money and the batteries need to be kept charged to keep them in good shape. A corded electric drill will be a lot cheaper and work when it is needed. If I didn’t use battery drill and drivers on top of ladders all the time, I wouldn’t by one for home or in shop use.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View mtenterprises's profile

mtenterprises

818 posts in 1327 days


#11 posted 1091 days ago

Ah you MUST include one of those flexable reach grip tools, you know the thing you push the button at one end to open and close the little wire fingers. Great for getting things out of the drain or the heat register. Get a real good one.
Now guys, WayneC mentioned a stud finder. Do you really think thats a proper tool to give young ladies???? HAHAHA
MIKE

-- See pictures on Flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/44216106@N07/ And visit my Facebook page - facebook.com/MTEnterprises

View KayBee's profile

KayBee

1003 posts in 1880 days


#12 posted 1091 days ago

All great suggestions guys!

I’ll most likely go with a corded drill because of the charging issues. It’s also cheaper. I’m doing two of these.
And more band aids!

They don’t really need a stud finder, the studs keep finding them : (

-- Karen - a little bit of stupid goes a long way

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mafe

9492 posts in 1723 days


#13 posted 1091 days ago

Band aid.
A little set of watchmakers screwdrivers for fixing glasses and opening electronics.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12265 posts in 2732 days


#14 posted 1091 days ago

Box cutter, or a utility knife… more band aids….

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View mafe's profile

mafe

9492 posts in 1723 days


#15 posted 1091 days ago

A little level for hanging pictures and other.
A pencil.

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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