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Finish that will stand up to nail polish remover

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Forum topic by staf0048 posted 11-14-2018 04:18 PM 656 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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staf0048

8 posts in 27 days


11-14-2018 04:18 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question polyurethane finish

A year ago I built my daughter an end table for her bedroom. I used a few coats of polyurethane for the finish thinking that would be the best protection. She had just turned 11 at the time and I knew she’d be leaving drinks on the table overnight.

What I didn’t realize is that she’d also use the table to do her nails….

I’m thinking of refinishing the top, but looking for advice on a finish that could hold up to both water and nail polish remover.


16 replies so far

View RobHannon's profile

RobHannon

177 posts in 727 days


#1 posted 11-14-2018 04:32 PM

I think catalyzed lacquer is pretty solvent resistant once cured. Many epoxies I think also will hold up to solvents, but they could haze. I’d test a scrap before doing a full refinish.

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

252 posts in 100 days


#2 posted 11-14-2018 04:35 PM

I’d suggest a piece of glass matching the size & shape of the end table top.

-- Phil Allin - Ventura, CA

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1478 posts in 359 days


#3 posted 11-14-2018 05:00 PM

X2 with Phil

.

.

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

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staf0048

8 posts in 27 days


#4 posted 11-14-2018 05:40 PM

Not sure I like the idea of a loose glass top in a 12 year olds room.

What is the best way to adhere it to the top?

View jbay's profile

jbay

2856 posts in 1096 days


#5 posted 11-14-2018 06:07 PM

I don’t think much will stand up to Acetone
Here are some tests below for pre-cat lacquer and Conversion Varnish
(Both are from Sherwin Williams)

Pre-Cat Lacquer:

Conversion Varnish:

View jonah's profile

jonah

1908 posts in 3495 days


#6 posted 11-14-2018 06:12 PM

You could adhere the glass to the top with a few small circles of putty. It would easily come off, but not accidentally.

If glass is not an option, those clear epoxy finishes people use on outdoor furniture would be my choice.

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John Smith

1478 posts in 359 days


#7 posted 11-14-2018 06:19 PM

Option #2.
let the kid just use it as her own – don’t admonish her about a few drops
of this, that and the other . . . . don’t refinish it or repair it in any way.
then, when she leaves home, put it in the closet.
then, when she has her own family, give it to her as her own personal
heirloom to pass down to her kids with the lesson of “what not to do”.

I wish I had my 12yo daughter back – - – she is 45 now with her own teenagers !!

.

.

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

415 posts in 1299 days


#8 posted 11-14-2018 07:26 PM

I think the glass is a good solution. Just be sure to get tempered glass so that, if it breaks, there will be no sharp shards. A few dabs of silicone sealant will hold it down. You could also use a sheet of acrylic or polycarbonate. I’m not sure if either would resist damage from acetone. But, they would be easily replaceable.

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staf0048

8 posts in 27 days


#9 posted 11-14-2018 07:58 PM

I kind of like the idea of just letting her “live with the scars”. Besides, who knows how much more she’s going to beat up on this table?

I’m pretty sure the blemishes bother me, more than it does her. I may just let it go and possibly refinish it (or not) when she’s out if the home.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5086 posts in 2548 days


#10 posted 11-14-2018 07:59 PM

Concrete.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

415 posts in 1299 days


#11 posted 11-15-2018 03:03 PM

Something that has not been suggested is plastic laminate. Very durable. My shop work table is covered with it and most everything I spill on it scrapes right off.

View DS's profile

DS

3030 posts in 2617 days


#12 posted 11-15-2018 03:11 PM

Many solvents will wreak havoc on plastic laminate. There are chemically resistant versions of most laminates that are typically required in Medical and Laboratory environments.

Most common grades of plastic laminates will hold up to chemicals to a point, but will eventually fail under extreme, or extended exposure cases.

But yes, I agree with you – plastic laminates are fairly durable, especially compared to wood finishes.


Something that has not been suggested is plastic laminate. Very durable. My shop work table is covered with it and most everything I spill on it scrapes right off.

- bilyo


-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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DS

3030 posts in 2617 days


#13 posted 11-15-2018 03:46 PM

I made a really nice headboard for my grown son a few years ago. A few weeks later he moved out of the house and into his own place and carelessly piled it into the back of an SUV with all his junk. The finished was scarred quite a bit from all the sharp edges against it.
He wanted me to refinish it, but I declined.

I always emphasized that the only way to have nice stuff is to take care of what we’ve got. I figure it is a good lesson learned.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1132 posts in 1012 days


#14 posted 11-15-2018 06:00 PM

Finger nail polish remover is acetone and I don’t know of any finish, including epoxy, that will resist it. I use acetone to remove epoxy from working surfaces.

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

415 posts in 1299 days


#15 posted 11-15-2018 09:27 PM

It just so happens that I have some scraps of plastic laminate and some acetone and lacquer thinner. I don’t know if the OP has any inclination to use plastic laminate. However, for the sake of the above discussion, I tried both on the plastic and neither had any noticeable effect. I left both in contact for about a minute replacing a drop or two as need when it evaporated.

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