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Online Two end log calculator

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Forum topic by greenhorn712 posted 1063 days ago 1172 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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greenhorn712

6 posts in 1063 days


1063 days ago

I am looking for an online log calculator which gives board feet, volume, and weight by species if possible, using both the fat and skinny end of a log. From what I’ve read online this is a “Two end conic rule?” I’m going to do some small scale logging in the near future and want to get an estimate of the yield I would be looking at before going to a mill or hiring a logger and somebody maybe trying to pull the wool over my eyes. Does anyoneknow of an online calculator using the two end rule? I’ve been unsuccessful in finding one. I’ve been able to find all kinds using only the skinny end. Thanks!

-- Nancy~~Washington State


6 replies so far

View Barbara Gill's profile

Barbara Gill

153 posts in 1263 days


#1 posted 1063 days ago

Try Woodweb.

-- Barbara

View Nomad62's profile

Nomad62

690 posts in 1561 days


#2 posted 1063 days ago

go to woodweb.com, they have the exact calculator you need.

-- Power tools put us ahead of the monkeys

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greenhorn712

6 posts in 1063 days


#3 posted 1062 days ago

Thanks Barbara and Nomad, the log volume calculator on Woodweb is perfect; but their board footage one only uses the small end of a log; I’d like to find a bdf calculator that uses both ends :-)

-- Nancy~~Washington State

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Nomad62

690 posts in 1561 days


#4 posted 1062 days ago

Well, I up and misread what you wrote, sorry about that. Anyway, all loggers and mills use the small end for board footage as that is the way it is cut; the bevel is considered waste as you cannot get a board out of it unless you are cutting a really long log and snip off what you can use from the cut-off. But to answer your question I would guess you could use the estimator from woodweb to get 2 measurements from full logs of each size you have, then average them; say a 20” log and an 18” log would average to a 19” log, making an 18×20 “coned” log a straight 19” log…

-- Power tools put us ahead of the monkeys

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WDHLT15

1079 posts in 1079 days


#5 posted 1062 days ago

If you are looking at board feet, the log rules like Doyle, International, and Scribner only use the length and the small end diameter. If you are looking for cubic foot volume, the google smalian’s formula.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

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greenhorn712

6 posts in 1063 days


#6 posted 1061 days ago

Thanks Nomad62, I’ve read up some about how the mills price and while I understand they have to make their money too, I’ve thought it’s a bit of a gip for them to only use the small end, ‘cause basically they’d be getting much of the tree for free?

WDHLT15, before your reply I hadn’t seen anything mentioning smalian’s formula, thank you! Now if I can find an actual calculator that uses that instead of articles, that’ll be good :-)

-- Nancy~~Washington State

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