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Forum topic by Fuzzybearz posted 11-12-2018 03:35 AM 604 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Fuzzybearz

41 posts in 267 days


11-12-2018 03:35 AM

Hello everyone,

My planer was working just fine until today when I put a piece of board through it and receive snipe on both ends.

I found out that putting it in the right half of the planer resulted in more snipe than on the left side. As in the right 7.5” resulted in more snipe than the left 7.5” (almost not noticeable). I thought it was the outfeed tables, but I am not seeing a difference in the cast iron tables at the point where it connects to the planer. There is no height difference.

I haven’t checked the height differences between the rollers and the table, but nothing should have changed as I have not touched the machine and it was working fine before.

I am possibly thinking that it is the roller or the anti kickback roller but have no idea how to tell. It throws me off more that feeding it to one side results in more snipe than the other. Any solutions?


16 replies so far

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2680 posts in 3081 days


#1 posted 11-12-2018 07:54 AM

Get a long, accurate straight edge and re-check your outfeed tables. You won’t see a difference where they connect up to the planer, however, you probably will see that the end of the table is no longer co-planer with the body of the planer. I have the 20” Powermatic version of your planer; whenever I start getting snipe it has always been the outfeed tables.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

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Rich

3874 posts in 788 days


#2 posted 11-12-2018 02:45 PM

Did the board have any bow in it? If it has even a slight concave bow (ends up in the air), the ends will sit high until they engage the rollers and you’ll get an exaggerated snipe.

It’s a long shot, but one I’ve run into with thinner boards that I can’t joint flat and plan to bend into shape. If you flip the board over it’ll be fine.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Fuzzybearz

41 posts in 267 days


#3 posted 11-12-2018 03:49 PM

Ive planed alot of different boards thinking it was the wood but they had the same results.

I did some more research and think like maniatario stated, its the outfeed. I didnt know there were set screws for adjustments. So i grab the in and outfeed tables to move the planer, should I be using something else?

Also does extruded aluminum work well for a straight edge? Or should I buy an actual one

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Rich

3874 posts in 788 days


#4 posted 11-12-2018 03:55 PM


Ive planed alot of different boards thinking it was the wood but they had the same results.

- Fuzzybearz

OK then. That’s different. You only mentioned one board in your post.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Manitario

2680 posts in 3081 days


#5 posted 11-12-2018 04:10 PM



Ive planed alot of different boards thinking it was the wood but they had the same results.

I did some more research and think like maniatario stated, its the outfeed. I didnt know there were set screws for adjustments. So i grab the in and outfeed tables to move the planer, should I be using something else?

Also does extruded aluminum work well for a straight edge? Or should I buy an actual one

- Fuzzybearz

The infeed and outfeed tables just tend to go out of alignment over time, I find I have to adjust mine a couple times a year. Moving by grabbing them probably doesn’t help! I’d buy a proper straight edge eg. http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=50074&cat=1,240,45313,50074
This will make it more accurate and you can also use it when you adjust your jointer.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

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Aj2

1870 posts in 1996 days


#6 posted 11-12-2018 04:41 PM

My pm 15 sniped really bad when I first bought it. The adjustment that helped the most was the bed rollers. But do make sure your Infeed and outfeed are set correctly. Then adjust the chip breaker.
I still get a small snipe on the end of single boards so if I want zero I use a backer salvage board at the beginning and end.
It’s really a lite weight planer so don’t expect too much precision.
Keep the adjustment springs oiled they get sticky the machine needs all the help it can get.
Good luck are you going to make endgrain cutting boards?

-- Aj

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Fuzzybearz

41 posts in 267 days


#7 posted 11-20-2018 02:35 AM

Alright after playing around with the outfeed/infeed im getting the same results which rules out the tables. The short board which shouldve also resulted in less or no sniping also confirms this.

My theory is it has something to do with the rollers. 2.5”, short or long board (pictured) has snipe. Ive drawn a red line.

Suggestions?

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Fuzzybearz

41 posts in 267 days


#8 posted 11-20-2018 02:37 AM

Liteweigjt? This seems industrial to me?

Good point on adding boards at rhe front and end. Would still like to solve this problem as it was working perfectly.

Plan is to make end grain!


My pm 15 sniped really bad when I first bought it. The adjustment that helped the most was the bed rollers. But do make sure your Infeed and outfeed are set correctly. Then adjust the chip breaker.
I still get a small snipe on the end of single boards so if I want zero I use a backer salvage board at the beginning and end.
It’s really a lite weight planer so don’t expect too much precision.
Keep the adjustment springs oiled they get sticky the machine needs all the help it can get.
Good luck are you going to make endgrain cutting boards?

- Aj2


View pintodeluxe's profile (online now)

pintodeluxe

5798 posts in 3011 days


#9 posted 11-20-2018 03:32 AM

It may well be the rollers. But before you give up on the in feed and out feed tables, keep in mind the tables need to be set higher at the far end. They should look like a shallow “V” when viewed from the side.

In other words setting your tables flat with the planner bed doesn’t cut it with most planners.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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Aj2

1870 posts in 1996 days


#10 posted 11-20-2018 04:26 AM

Powermatic used to make some very nice heavy planers. Our machines were made in Taiwan try clamping a dial indicator somewhere on the frame.Set the tip so it touches the bottom of the bed and see how much it flexes.
Mine flexes about 10 / 12 thou. To me that’s flimsy
Where’s your dust collection

-- Aj

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rwe2156

3168 posts in 1679 days


#11 posted 11-20-2018 02:50 PM

Most snipe occurs on the exit from machine. One quit trick is to keep a little upward pressure on the board as it exits.

Snipe results from the board lifting off the bed as it enters/exits the cutter head. Bowed boards, insufficient roller pressure, and bed rollers can be the cause. Be sure your jointer is set up right and the board is flat. Some planers inherently snipe but on most it can be adjusted out.

I adjusted my bed rollers down flat with the bed and this eliminated all snipe from my machine.

You can also address snipe issues by using a sled that extends from infeed to outfeed through the planer. Put a cleat on the infeed end to keep sled from getting pulled.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Fuzzybearz

41 posts in 267 days


#12 posted 11-23-2018 07:15 AM



Powermatic used to make some very nice heavy planers. Our machines were made in Taiwan try clamping a dial indicator somewhere on the frame.Set the tip so it touches the bottom of the bed and see how much it flexes.
Mine flexes about 10 / 12 thou. To me that’s flimsy
Where’s your dust collection

- Aj2

: ) worked on the dust collection tonight. I thought it wouldnt be hard to take someone elses metal ducting and apply it to mine. Turns out I shiuldve just shelled out for brand new, they stepped down from 8 to 7 to 6 to 5 to 4 and the length of the ducts arent the same in my garage : /

Ill try adjusting the rollers. The wood I feed through is flat and confirmed. Thanks everyone. Hopefully I fix it this weekend

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Fuzzybearz

41 posts in 267 days


#13 posted 11-23-2018 07:21 AM

For clarifixation, the rollers are the bottom rollers and the top ones are something else right?

I believe my bottom.rollers are flush with the bottom, I was thinking thr clampijg pressure from up top was too much?


Most snipe occurs on the exit from machine. One quit trick is to keep a little upward pressure on the board as it exits.

Snipe results from the board lifting off the bed as it enters/exits the cutter head. Bowed boards, insufficient roller pressure, and bed rollers can be the cause. Be sure your jointer is set up right and the board is flat. Some planers inherently snipe but on most it can be adjusted out.

I adjusted my bed rollers down flat with the bed and this eliminated all snipe from my machine.

You can also address snipe issues by using a sled that extends from infeed to outfeed through the planer. Put a cleat on the infeed end to keep sled from getting pulled.

- rwe2156


View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

4767 posts in 2507 days


#14 posted 11-23-2018 10:41 AM

Look through all the picture of this vintage 18 inch Powermatic planer. This is what Aj2 meant about the PM 15 being flimsy.
When I was working for the school district we have 3 of the older ones like this. They are really made much more substantial than now.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Powermatic-221-20-Planer-/132862807872

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Richard Lee's profile

Richard Lee

196 posts in 973 days


#15 posted 11-23-2018 01:58 PM

You can also check your pressure bars, might help.

showing 1 through 15 of 16 replies

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