LumberJocks

Should I buy a Used 36" Starrett Straight Edge on Line?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by kresso posted 08-31-2011 08:54 PM 2668 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View kresso's profile

kresso

22 posts in 2118 days


08-31-2011 08:54 PM

Topic tags/keywords: straightedge straight edge garret wade veritas starrett 380 question

I hope this is the right place for this question. So I am looking for a straight edge to line up my tools with and need something in the range of 3 feet or more for my jointer (19 inch out feed table) I looked at the Garret Wade and Veritas aluminum straight edges and then seem ok, but since I will only be supporting it from one end I am assuming steel will deflect less. A new 36” Starrett 380 looks to be 155 on amazon, and a steel veritas from lee valley is about 79. I can find a used Starret 380 3’ online but I have no way to verify if it was dropped or is still square. What are people’s recommendations? Thanks a ton I am just getting started in this and don’t really know much.

-- -Matthew Kress


11 replies so far

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13003 posts in 2156 days


#1 posted 08-31-2011 09:01 PM

For something like this, I’d avoid Ebay. I’ve bought small Starrett and Mitutoyo squares and rules off Ebay with good success but something this large? I’d go new. The LV is probably pretty good for your needs. Are you really sure you need such a nice straight-edge to set your jointer?

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Loren's profile

Loren

8302 posts in 3110 days


#2 posted 08-31-2011 09:03 PM

A 4 foot level works fine. You don’t need a precision straight edge to
set up a jointer. Modern milled-edge levels are straight enough.

In setting up guitars and so forth, a straight edge is more useful
because of its narrowness, but that’s not an issue with setting
up jointers.

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

2633 posts in 2571 days


#3 posted 08-31-2011 09:25 PM

FWIW, I checked the old cast iron table on the saw I bought from Loren ^ with a level (the table is nice and flat, btw, only a couple thousandths off). Check two levels against one another just like you would check 2 by 4s for straightness at the Borg. You might be surprised how straight they are (and how easy to check).

As far as getting a scale through the mail or other source, I guess you need to find out whether the handlers want to use it for a katana (slicing) or broadsword (hacking) in their boredom. =/ I personally would only buy a scale I can lay my eyes on to inspect.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

View Loren's profile

Loren

8302 posts in 3110 days


#4 posted 08-31-2011 09:29 PM

I bought that saw from the family of a patternmaker, Jack. I got a bunch
of nice hand tools from them too. They swore people used to try to
buy the saw off the patternmaker, but he refused to sell it.

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13003 posts in 2156 days


#5 posted 08-31-2011 09:33 PM

What saw is this that you are talking about? Is there a picture of it somewhere? I feel like I have to see it! If it’s one of those old die-making tablesaws, I’m going to cry.

It’s nice when you can buy vintage equipment from a guy you trust, like Loren. I’ve got my own guy here in hillbilly WV. He’s a big machine freak, so I often have a chance to pick up a machine when he upgrades. I don’t know where he’s going to go from where he’s at. Maybe an Elmo?

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

2633 posts in 2571 days


#6 posted 09-01-2011 03:44 AM

Nope, it doesn’t even look like a die-maker’s saw. It’s just some antique cast iron table saw…not to denigrate a good thing.

Loren, did you sell that other saw, yet? A pic of that could stir some interest, now.

Back on topic, crone has the right idea. Make them pack it in a piece of wood, like a 2X4- rout a groove and lay it in, and nail another board on top. Try and bust THAT.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

View 8iowa's profile

8iowa

1546 posts in 3224 days


#7 posted 09-01-2011 04:00 AM

I have the Veritas 50” aluminum straightedge, which is advertised to be straight within 3 thousandths over the entire length. It is quite substantial and will stand up by itself, which is quite handy. I use it for machine set-ups including “zeroing in” roller stands on both ends of my 4” jointer. This is a very useful tool.

-- "Heaven is North of the Bridge"

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12642 posts in 3560 days


#8 posted 09-01-2011 04:29 AM

I was thinking Veritas when I saw this post as well..

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View kresso's profile

kresso

22 posts in 2118 days


#9 posted 09-01-2011 05:25 AM

Thanks everyone for your comments. I will take a close look at the Veritas. Probably the online one is too risky for too much money.

-- -Matthew Kress

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3926 posts in 2706 days


#10 posted 09-01-2011 05:52 PM

Kresso; “Square” doesn’t apply to a straightedge. A steel straightedge is just a piece of steel. The worst that can happen is; it’s bent or rusted. Rust is not too much of a concern (can be removed) and bent, can be straightened. It can only bend in one plane,(the thickness plane). If the price is good, I would take a chance with it. People who own precision tools, usually take care of them. They don’t get trashed like regular hand tools do.

View kresso's profile

kresso

22 posts in 2118 days


#11 posted 09-02-2011 02:13 PM

MrRon; Thanks, I shouldn’t have used the word square, but straight. Thanks for you input.

-- -Matthew Kress

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com