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How Thick is thick?

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Forum topic by steviep posted 08-31-2011 06:40 PM 1032 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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steviep

232 posts in 1400 days


08-31-2011 06:40 PM

Topic tags/keywords: jig question

Hey LJ’s,

This is for those of you that use a thickness sander. I was wondering what do you use it most for? Most I have talked to say that they sand panels and doors. Is that the general consensus?

-- StevieP ~ Micheal Tompkins - you were not here on earth long but left a giant mark on us. RIP Brother


20 replies so far

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5608 posts in 2128 days


#1 posted 08-31-2011 07:24 PM

never mind! (sander….not planer!)

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View RogerBean's profile

RogerBean

1296 posts in 1706 days


#2 posted 08-31-2011 07:40 PM

Stevie,
I mostly make boxes. I regularly use my little Performax (Jet) 10 inch sander for the following:
1) finish sizing resawn box sides and lids
2) evening out glued up box side panels. Where I glue solids to Baltic birch ply to cover exposed areas, like the bottom, I usually make the solid pieces a bit larger, then sand to match the ply.
3) dimensioning a banding core. For example, when i make a figured satinwood core with an outside line of black/white/black veneer and want it to fit in a groove made by a 3/8”router bit.
4. dimensioning tray sides to 3/16”, which I normally cut from 2” x 2” turning squares.
I could not make the boxes I make without this little sander.

There are, of course, many other uses, but these are my most common.
Roger

-- "Everybody makes mistakes. A craftsman always fixes them." (Monty Kennedy, "The Checkering and Carving of Gunstocks", 1952)

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1446 days


#3 posted 08-31-2011 07:54 PM

I’m also interested in the answer to this question. With StevieP’s permission, I’d add the question, “has is appreciably changed your work? I’ve never even seriously considered buying one. With their popularity, I suspect I’m missing something.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Don W's profile

Don W

15572 posts in 1320 days


#4 posted 08-31-2011 08:04 PM

Al, as a hand plane enthusiast, I think its illegal for you to own a thickness sander.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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steviep

232 posts in 1400 days


#5 posted 08-31-2011 08:26 PM

Ask away Al! Although I’m with Don:)

-- StevieP ~ Micheal Tompkins - you were not here on earth long but left a giant mark on us. RIP Brother

View agallant's profile

agallant

436 posts in 1639 days


#6 posted 08-31-2011 09:05 PM

I use mine for two things.

1. Making things smooth. For example I made a table top out of lacewood wrapped with ebony wrapped with bubinga. I used the drum sander to get everything nice and smooth.

2. Getting things sanded enough to fit perfect.

I always cringe and the idea of a ‘thickness snader’ to me that implys that you can get a consistant thinckness and just feed stock through, no true, a plainer will do that a drum sander will not have as much control over how thick things end up. I will usailly use my plainer for thickness then my drum sander for evenness.

spell check is broken…..

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agallant

436 posts in 1639 days


#7 posted 08-31-2011 09:09 PM

Also I could not imagine my shop without one now that I have bought it. It is a huge time saver and things come out really nice with it. You will love doing inlays if you get one.

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1393 days


#8 posted 08-31-2011 09:23 PM

What are some brands/models that are recommended ?

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1446 days


#9 posted 08-31-2011 09:42 PM

Thanks, StevieP. I suppose it really depends upon what type of work you’re doing. I’m imagining Agallant’s inlays…I bet the sander is perfect for that, keeping a nice flat plane.

Like Don remarks, I don’t expect to find one in my shop but I won’t say never. They are really cool looking, after all.

David, I know a lot of people like the JET. The Grizzly seems hit/miss. Many are building their own, of course.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

5316 posts in 1551 days


#10 posted 08-31-2011 09:44 PM

Leveling substrates, before applying veneer / marquetry, tuning uniform thickness in shop cut veneer, leveling inlay / marquetry after glue-up when applicable.
I do use it on thicker items sometimes but the real advantage to me is the precision thicknessing on thin critical materials.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1393 days


#11 posted 08-31-2011 10:06 PM

Yeah, I was just drooling over Blake’s and dammit if I didn’t have another one of those “Hell, I can make that !” moments.

I wish more Jocks would make their prototypes (to keep) and then take orders. (I like giving orders !)

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View BilltheDiver's profile

BilltheDiver

234 posts in 1638 days


#12 posted 08-31-2011 10:14 PM

The thing they make best is sawdust! I wasn’t sure how much I would use one, but was interested. A friend gave me a deal on an OLD Ryobi. I did some modifications to it and now find myself using it on almost every project. It is great for leveling a glue up, or when resawing some thin stock, or just for preliminary prep before finish sanding.

-- "Measure twice, cut once, count fingers"

View SASmith               's profile

SASmith

1637 posts in 1740 days


#13 posted 08-31-2011 10:28 PM

I use it to thickness thin strips cut on a bandsaw. I would not want to run an 1/8” strip through the planer.
Lots of “abrasive planing” of endgrain boards but only after I run it over my “abrasive jointer”(18” v-drum).
Occasionally on figured wood that is tear-out prone.
Any time I need to flatten a crossgrain glue-up.
Flattening rings of my bowls and removing glue block waste from the bottom of my bowls.
If you check out my projects there are very few that I did not use a thickness sander or v-drum sander on.
I would not want to be without it.

-- Scott Smith, Southern Illinois

View Greg..the Cajun Wood Artist's profile

Greg..the Cajun Wood Artist

5277 posts in 2061 days


#14 posted 08-31-2011 10:36 PM

I have a Jet 22-44 drum sander and it is invaluable. It will finish thin strips too small to run through my plane…r and I have found it to work best when smoothing out highly figured woods.
A planer will not take the cup out of a board but will rather just squeeze it down when planing. The drum sander will sand the high spots out. I have salvaged numerous boards with it that would normally been useless. It has so many uses and it is one of those tools that alot more use than I would have realized prior to buying it.
Tou will not regret buying one.

-- Each step of every Wood Art project I design and build is considered my masterpieceā€¦ because I want the finished product to reflect the quality and creativeness of my work

View doyoulikegumwood's profile

doyoulikegumwood

384 posts in 2745 days


#15 posted 08-31-2011 10:55 PM

My take on it is that it is a huge time saver hence the fact that one of the bigest makers of these is Time Saver.

-- I buy tools so i can make more money,so ican buy more tools so I can work more, to make more money, so I can buy more tool, so I can work more

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