LumberJocks

Casting Epoxy to Turn

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by tyskkvinna posted 08-31-2011 03:33 PM 4402 views 3 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View tyskkvinna's profile

tyskkvinna

1308 posts in 1651 days


08-31-2011 03:33 PM

I did some searching, but found that all I could find was posts on filling cracks so I do apologise if this is a repeat subject (or at least a recent repeat…)

I have a bunch of extremely pretty exotic sawdust and some chips that came out neat.. like curly-cues or something. Also have a bunch of sawdust-like chips from some plastic projects I was working on and they’re in a giant rainbow of colours. So I was thinking of casting this in epoxy to turn into blanks.

Anybody tried this? Does a particular brand or variety work better than others? I would, of course, like to be able to polish it to a water finish and then coat it with something (CA I imagine? Maybe more resin?) so that the parts of the turning that are the chips on edge are sealed.

I’ve done a lot of work with clear epoxy but I’ve never had to cut into it after I cast something so I’m not quite sure on that.

Was also thinking of casting them in my vacuum chamber to help it along- if that particular epoxy that I eventually choose works well with that method! Not a requirement though.

-- Lis - Michigan - http://www.missmooseart.com - https://www.etsy.com/people/lisbokt


18 replies so far

View tom427cid's profile

tom427cid

294 posts in 1136 days


#1 posted 08-31-2011 03:41 PM

Hi,
I don’t think that epoxy would be the best choice,rather the clear plastic resin(maybe we are saying the same thing-just different word).Resin can be machined,drille,tapped,etc. And after turning,using sucsessively finer grits can be smothed and polished.Check with pen turners for best products for final finish.
Hope this helps.
tom

-- "certified sawdust maker"

View SSMDad's profile

SSMDad

395 posts in 1262 days


#2 posted 08-31-2011 04:13 PM

Something like this http://www.amazon.com/Easy-Cast-Clear-Casting-Enamel/dp/B003CHQWDW/ref=pd_sxp_f_pt seems as if it would work. I’d thought about doing this myself.

-- Chris ~~Who controls the past controls the future. Who controls the present controls the past."

View sarahss's profile

sarahss

254 posts in 1314 days


#3 posted 08-31-2011 04:13 PM

I belong to a pen turners forum, and lots of the folks there use polyester resin. You can get it (i think) at michael’s or hobby lobby. you have to add the MEK catalyst to it, but from what i’ve seen posted on the pen site, you are only limited by you imagination.

View tyskkvinna's profile

tyskkvinna

1308 posts in 1651 days


#4 posted 08-31-2011 04:46 PM

Sweet. I will try out the polyester resin. It looks like exactly what I want, and getting it locally is even better!

-- Lis - Michigan - http://www.missmooseart.com - https://www.etsy.com/people/lisbokt

View Brian Havens's profile

Brian Havens

194 posts in 1771 days


#5 posted 08-31-2011 05:05 PM

There is some good info on embedding things into pen blanks in this article. He is specifically embedding feathers, but much of the info is generally relevant.

http://content.penturners.org/library/pen_blanks/casting_feather_blanks.pdf

I was looking into doing this kind of work, but never got around to it. It seems that the most difficult part is getting all the air bubbles out of the resin before it sets.

-- Brian Havens, Woodworker http://brianhavens.com

View Nomad62's profile

Nomad62

716 posts in 1623 days


#6 posted 08-31-2011 05:20 PM

Sounds like a good idea, what the heck. The vacuum thing I would recommend against tho, since vacuum dries by accelerated evaporation it may tend to bubble (boil) the epoxy as epoxy is a chemical set-up rather than an evaporative drying process. Best of luck!

-- Power tools put us ahead of the monkeys

View Steven Davis's profile

Steven Davis

110 posts in 1579 days


#7 posted 08-31-2011 06:28 PM

Have you tried making something based on machinists wax?

http://www.machinablewax.com/using_machinable_wax.htm

-- Steven Davis - see me at http://www.playnoevil.com/ and http://www.stelgames.com/

View SignWave's profile

SignWave

135 posts in 1700 days


#8 posted 08-31-2011 07:43 PM

Keep in mind that most epoxy is exothermic, which means that it gives off heat when it cures. If you’re talking about a curing a large volume of epoxy, there is a danger that the heat will build up to the point to be a fire hazard.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

2846 posts in 1908 days


#9 posted 08-31-2011 08:49 PM

Check out this site. WWW.smooth-on.com

View rance's profile

rance

4135 posts in 1825 days


#10 posted 09-01-2011 03:39 AM

Lis, if you buy the resin at Michael’s, wait till you can get a 30% off coupon. It is worth the wait. A friend uses this all the time for casting pen blanks. He does not vacuum, but it wouldn’t hurt. Keep us up to date with your progress. :)

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View crank49's profile

crank49

3442 posts in 1636 days


#11 posted 09-01-2011 04:11 AM

In jewelry manufacturing I have cast resins, waxes, epoxies, urethanes, and silicone. Vacuuming to remove entrained gasses is standard practice, but the timing is critical.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

11547 posts in 1770 days


#12 posted 09-01-2011 04:37 AM

I did a floor once in Torgonal. It was a clear resin that you spread on the floor and then dropped in multicolored chips. After it dried, you raked off the loose chips and then spread another coat of resin and more chips to fill in any bare areas. Then it was about 5 more coats of clear to finish. At one point you took a grinder or floor sander and cut off all the chips sticking through the 3rd coat. I don’t know if you can find that product any more, but we had to wear a gas mask because it was a carcinogen. It would wear like iron!!

Polyester resin is what is used with fiberglass to do car body repairs. You can get that at an automotive supply place by the quart. I don’t know how much you’ll need, but that is a product that might work for you, too.
Are the blanks, pen blanks?

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View tyskkvinna's profile

tyskkvinna

1308 posts in 1651 days


#13 posted 09-01-2011 05:00 AM

Jim- I’m thinking some for pen blanks and some other pieces for milling blanks… lots of ideas!!

-- Lis - Michigan - http://www.missmooseart.com - https://www.etsy.com/people/lisbokt

View Keith Fenton's profile

Keith Fenton

316 posts in 1585 days


#14 posted 09-01-2011 08:25 AM

I think you will find epoxy, while being nice to turn, winds up being too soft in the end. A polyester casting resin will be more suitable. Pen blank makers often use these two brands. The first is very good for bonding with wood for a mixed wood/acrylic casting (it’s also very easy and fun to turn)

Alumilite Clear

http://www.alumilite.com/ProdDetail.cfm?Category=Casting%20Resins&Name=Alumilite%20Clear

The 2nd is very cheap but works quite good on its own for acrylic blanks. I don’t know if it would work well for what you want to do.

Silmar41 (scroll down on this page)
http://www.uscomposites.com/polyesters.html

-- Scroll saw patterns @ http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com

View Doe's profile

Doe

984 posts in 1495 days


#15 posted 09-03-2012 01:21 PM

tyskkvinna, how did it go? I’m looking at embedding brass shavings and other stuff in wood for wine stoppers, boxes and other stuff, other than pens. I’m afraid that the chemical reaction of epoxy my react (badly) with what I’m trying to embed. I’m not too keen on spending the money on resin unless it’s the best way. It has a limited shelf life and I’m not sure if I’d use it all.

Thanks, Doe

-- Mother Nature talks, I try to listen

showing 1 through 15 of 18 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase