LumberJocks

Milling troublesome stock

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by groland posted 11-08-2018 09:01 PM 237 views 0 times favorited 3 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View groland's profile

groland

210 posts in 3585 days


11-08-2018 09:01 PM

Topic tags/keywords: milling troublesome stock

I have some 8/4 walnut timber I want to use to make table legs. The boards are beautiful, check free, split free, knot free—really nice stuff. BUT, I am having a devil of a time milling it. I have a wide variety of hand planes as well as a jointer and thickness planer.

The boards are cupped and have quite a lot of wind. When jointing with my jointer, one corner always wears down first and there is a pronounced bump in the center of the board.

I thought to try taking the wind out first with some hand planing, but that was a disaster too.

I am now very discouraged. I don’t know what is the best way to attack this problem…which tools to use and in what order.

What has worked for you?

Many thanks,

George Roland


3 replies so far

View fivecodys's profile (online now)

fivecodys

1202 posts in 1809 days


#1 posted 11-08-2018 09:09 PM

Hi George,
Have you tried cutting the board down to smaller (shorter) pieces and then working them individually?
I just bought a 10’ long 7” wide 8/4 Mahogany plank that had the same issues.
I was able to cut it into 3 pieces and then worked through the issues that way.
I used the joiner to flatten the faces on all three then the planer to flatten the other sides.

-- I always knew I would grow old, But I expected it to take longer!

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

1588 posts in 747 days


#2 posted 11-08-2018 09:32 PM

Is the stock still square, or have you already cut the leg tapers? If it is still square stock, how well does it lie flat when you cut a piece 1” longer than your legs need to be? Is it dead flat? Is it pretty flat, or is it trying to walk back to the woods?

All I can do is tell you how I would do it.

STEP1 Cut to Rough Length

STEP2 Cut to Rough Width If the board is amenable I’ll do this on TS, if not I usually use a BS to rip for rough width

Doing both of above first sections the boards into the smallest sized boards you can use. This goes a long way to decrease any cup, twist, or bow you may have.

STEP 3 Face-Jointing Here picking which side is going to be the one that will come closest to contacting the joiner bed on all 4 corners. You don’t want to put the curve of a potato chip down and start making passes where soon you will have jointed away all of the middle, and be left with two outside pieces. Instead you can put the board up on high edges, and work just those down till flat. Hopefully your stock isn’t so cupped, bowed, and twisted you need any of this to be extreme. Sometimes though if you want 1 1/2” legs, and start with 2” stock that is wildly twisted you could run out of wood before you were square.

STEP 4 Joint one edge. Sounds pretty easy, but can get weird depending on your fence not being at 90* or having a wane edge on both sides, SEE item 2…. when cutting to width you need something that can be easily jointed.

STEP 5 Plane for thickness, ALWAYS pre jointed side DOWN, you want to take the first passes off the non jointed side. When flat, swap each pass until you reach the proper thickness.

STEP 6 Rip to final width.

If your stock will lay flat on a known flat surface and you get no light under after you cut to length, just go straight to the planer if all you need is a smaller size of the perfect looking wood you have. With S4S Stock it can happen, maybe not often, but it can.

-- Think safe, be safe

View groland's profile

groland

210 posts in 3585 days


#3 posted 11-08-2018 11:17 PM

Thanks for these sensible and useful replies. I am going to do one thing before I get more depressed over this—check out my jointer. I think my jointer may well be out of alignment somehow. I need to check the co-planarity of the tables and the height and eveness of the cutters. More to come….

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com